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Making Organizational Learning Stick: How to Set Your Knowledge Goals

Making Organizational Learning Stick: How to Set Your Knowledge Goals | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Henry Ford once observed, “Anyone who keeps learning stays young.” This is as true for nonprofit organizations as it is for individuals.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to develop learning organizations through good ideas, good practice, and good collaboration.

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Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, August 26, 2013 11:17 AM

Great 'do's and don'ts of writing learning goals.

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 2014 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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25 Must-Read Books for the Educational Hacktivist or Contrarian - Etale - Digital Age Learning

Maybe you love the way things are going in modern education. Perhaps you are desperately looking for an alternative. Or, you might already be deeply rooted in alternative education or educational Continue Reading →

Via Valary Oleinik
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first and last one say it all and bracket the list well. Postman drew on Ivan Illich's ideas in his book.

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5 papers every learning professional should read

5 papers every learning professional should read | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I don't read as many journal articles as I'd like. Given the challenges and pressures of professional life, combined with everything else that's been going on privately, I've fallen out of the habi...

Via Valary Oleinik
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I used Gert Biesta extensively in my dissertation. I rue the day we shifted from relational language that involves someone teaching someone to the what he calls the "learnification of educational discourse" based on learning outcomes as if they could be fixed.

 

William Pinar writes in similar vein questioning the neo-liberal and neo-conservative agendas at work in education.

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Radical Pedagogy - Visual Thinkery

Radical Pedagogy - Visual Thinkery | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
My wife is my signpost – for some things, anyway. She reads faster than me and tells me of books that I might like. I have but one requirement: at the end of the book, I want to be able to say “I’ve never read anything like that before”. As a result, I’ve been enjoying …

Via juandoming, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Paulo Freire's work was aimed largely at adults. Certainly, we want children to question the world and explore it, but will they understand what oppression really is and subvert it? We can begin the process with open dialogue including eloquent questions without fixed answers and understand we exist in radically contingent worlds. We do not know what is around the next corner.

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Frances's curator insight, February 7, 9:53 AM

A tool you can use.  Thank you Bryan.

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PE for all? Not just a slogan but an effective educational innovation

PE for all? Not just a slogan but an effective educational innovation | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
PE for children who do not like PE: it is an attractive slogan for the majority who are not the fastest, the strongest or blessed with the best hand-to-eye co-ordination. As Richard Garner, our Education Editor, reports today, it is not just a slogan but an effective educational innovation. 

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The opening says it all. Good PE teachers reach most and often all of their students by shifting the way they invite students to participate. It is not just about the best showing off and dominating, but everyone participating.

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Creating An Empowering School Environment - Hybrid Pedagogy

Creating An Empowering School Environment - Hybrid Pedagogy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This story is about technology and how its use can contribute to building a culture of trust and empowerment.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A key conclusion was that trust was placed in teachers first. They could choose how to use social media and understood that boundaries existed. That is a key first step. My experience is that teachers are externally ordered (Gert Biesta's work is interesting) by bureaucrats and technocrats who appear to have little insight into the messy conditions that exist in classrooms and their human relationships.

 

This article, based on research, was not a blind acceptance or a total rejection of social media, but a realistic and practical assessment.

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Icarus Falling: Re-Imagining Educational Theory

Icarus Falling: Re-Imagining Educational Theory | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This article offers a critique of the notion of ‘capacity building’ in educational theory. Are the intentions behind the latter enterprise as benign and altruistic as they first appear? How is the term ‘capacity building’ to be understood?

Via Dan Kirsch
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article. What does capacity building mean? We use terms as if they are neutral, but that is not the case. Who is served through capacity building?

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Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One?

Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It’s not about performing, in either sense of the word.


Via Richard Andrews, Roger Francis, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leadership and management, although both vital, are not the same, but are often conflated. A person who can micro-manage and check off lists like many educational managers can think they are leading. They are managing and not doing that well. Living does not involve a fixed script and leading in the midst of complexity requires qualities many do not have or are not allowed to use.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 4, 11:50 AM

(From the article): When leaders empower people through a higher purpose, they don’t have to “create buy-in” or use other marketing tactics to win over their followers. Leaders who do find themselves acting something like a pusher — resorting to perks, tit-for-tats, and bonuses — might want to ask themselves if they’re missing some larger point. A leader isn’t a salesman. When Steve Jobs asked John Sculley his famous question, “Do you really want to spend your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?” he was making just such a distinction. Selling sugared water might make you a few bucks — but only at the cost of doing something that matters. The purpose of a leader is to create a purpose.


And yet although that sounds very inspiring, a leader’s job still is not to give inspiring speeches. A leader isn’t an orator who claps everyone on the back once in a while when they’ve sunk into a torpor. The job of a leader is indeed to inspire people — but in the truer sense of the word: from the Latin inspirare, inspire, to breathe or blow into. Leaders breathe life into the organizations they lead, into the people they’re responsible for. They breathe life into possibilities. They make it more possible for the rest of us to dare, imagine, create, and build. They do not merely encourage us to do so; theirs is the hard work of crafting all the incentives, processes, systems, and roles that actually empower us to do so.

 

Leadership is in an uncertain place. We long desperately for better leaders. But perhaps it is precisely our longing that’s the problem. We’re waiting for a rescue at the cost of our own redemption.

Because it’s easier to complain about the leaders we have than to try to do better. After all, it’s a pretty hard job.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, February 5, 12:59 PM

A very good question for all leaders today.

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The one-room schoolhouse is the next big thing in education

The one-room schoolhouse is the next big thing in education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here's why "micro schools" could save private education.

Via Antonia Rudenstine
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is interesting. I taught for 17 years in a mixed grade classroom and the powers to be could not wait to shut us down. We (the teachers) actually put a proposal forward to expand to about 150 students, a number we felt was about the right maximum.

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Antonia Rudenstine's curator insight, February 3, 9:40 AM

Micro-schools are currently private, but do they need to be? These schools are finding affordable ways to personalize learning using technology and a small scale. Tuition in Austin Texas is about $10k...not so different from public per pupil spending. District & charter schools need to be looking at the kinds of models that middle-class families are choosing: whether it's homeschool collective or micro-schools. The move is towards student agency, deep learning, adaptability and flexibility.

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The Future Belongs to the Curious: How Are We Bringing Curiosity Into School?

The Future Belongs to the Curious: How Are We Bringing Curiosity Into School? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The only rational answer to the conundrum of curiosity is to disengage our educational system from standardized testing and common curricula. Curiosity does not hold up well under intense expectation. Give agency to teachers, with the explicit message to slow down and provide students time to wonder and be curious.

 


Via Nik Peachey, Becky Roehrs, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Cheryl Frose
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Children, and for that matter teachers, bring curiousity with them. Teachers can help create contexts where that curiousity remains vibrant.

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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 9:27 AM

Engage students by sparking their curiosity and they will work like you have never seen them work before. Stay curious as an educator and it is easier to hook your students.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, November 23, 2015 1:17 PM

Et le RTBF nous dit d'être curieux. Voilà leur diction revisité. Pour que nos étudiants soient curieux, il faut encore l'être soi-même et adapter la manière de l'évaluer.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, November 28, 2015 10:32 PM

Curiosity projects, MakerSpaces, Passion projects, asking questions and seeking answers...all mind-expanders.

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Why the Leadership Industry Has Failed

Why the Leadership Industry Has Failed | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Corporate training in the U.S. is a $70 billion market, and 35% of that is spent on management and leadership training. Over the last several decades, the industry has produced a recipe for how to be a successful corporate leader: Be trustworthy and authentic, serve others (particularly those who work for and with you), be modest, and exhibit empathetic understanding and emotional intelligence.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Wise Leader™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We confuse management with leadership. Both are important, but they are different. We cannot summarize leadership into a recipe of 7 habits, 3 phases, 5 outcomes, etc. It is too non-linear and complex.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 26, 2015 3:24 PM

People generally want to see and hear only good things about their leaders, so they tend to ignore contradictory evidence and failures. There’s all this mythologizing that besets leadership, as people try to generalize and learn from exceptional cases.


Steve Bax's curator insight, November 27, 2015 4:56 AM

Very stimulating article here. 

 

My take-aways are:

"It’s far more important for leaders to understand what a particular situation requires and to act in an appropriate way, says Pfeffer. “Leaders need to be true to what the situation demands and what the people around them want and need,”

In the end, says Pfeffer, we would all be better off accepting that our leaders are generally not truthful, authentic, modest, or trustworthy, largely the opposite of the message we get from the popular motivational leadership stories we hear. “All those stories and the inspiration we get from them change nothing,” he says. “The fundamental problem with this industry is the disconnect between what we say we want from our leaders and how they actually manage organizations.”

Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His new book, Leadership BS: Fixing Workplaces and Careers One Truth at a Time, was published by Harper Business. Has to be worth a read!

 

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, November 29, 2015 9:47 AM

Interesting point of view.  What do you think. 

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Statistic Of The Day: We Have Eight Second Attention Spans (& How I'm Using This Info In The Classroom)

Statistic Of The Day: We Have Eight Second Attention Spans (& How I'm Using This Info In The Classroom) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The Eight-Second Attention Span is a new column in The New York Times, written by Timothy Egan. Here's an excerpt: He goes on to suggest that gardening and reading might be two ways to increase our...


Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

And there were some of us who began with an attention span below average.

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The Power Of Routines In Sustaining Creativity :: Fast Company :: Sarah Lawson

The Power Of Routines In Sustaining Creativity :: Fast Company :: Sarah Lawson | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Austin-based author and artist Sunni Brown makes sense of problems through her dual talents: writing and doodling. She runs consulting firm Sunni Brown Ink, where she helps businesses solve problems using a visual mapping system she calls infodoodling. She's written two books about unlocking creativity, Gamestorming (2010) and The Doodle Revolution (2015), and has just begun working on a third.

But before she helps others unlock their creative potential, she has to channel some inspiration for herself. Here's how she does it:

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a very interesting article. Routine is not something we try to rid ourselves of, but something we try to better understand in our creativity.

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Fixing Schools Outside of School

Fixing Schools Outside of School | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Districts are turning to private companies, nonprofits, and foundations for partnerships that can help tackle the biggest impediments to learning.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Fixing sounds like we know how to cure what ails things and people. It is why we are in the bind we are in. The people closest to the scene, teachers, parents, and students, have the least say in what happens. It should not be a free-for-all, but isn't that what we have now? And, yes we do have external partners helping us, hence the neo-liberal economic and political agendas perpetuated in our curricula.

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From Solitary to Society - Harvard Political Review

From Solitary to Society - Harvard Political Review | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Almost 100,000 prisoners in America are in solitary confinement. This degrades their mental health and makes the transition back to society much harder.

Via Darcy Delaproser
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Those who think solitary confinement is appropriate should ask how they might like to cut almost completely from meaningful human contact.

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Why You Need to Hire More Wrestlers and Soccer Players

Why You Need to Hire More Wrestlers and Soccer Players | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Athletes are driven to perform at a high level. They choose to compete and spend time honing their abilities to win. Individual and team athletes bring different skills, but they can both be assets to your company
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a short and interesting article.

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My Biggest Regret as a Teacher - Cooper on Curriculum

My Biggest Regret as a Teacher - Cooper on Curriculum | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In June 2014 I officially left my job as a fourth grade teacher, and the classroom, to become an administrator. Since joining the dark side, I continuously ask myself what I could have and should have done differently for my students.


Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Do we want children to hear us making sarcastic and cutting comments?

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How to achieve academic excellence

How to achieve academic excellence | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Academic excellence is the quality of being eminent in the field of higher education particularly teaching and research. There are high qualities of educational programs in certain institutions in the world from where many illustrious academicians made their way to the world. However, most... https://www.allassignmenthelp.co.uk/blog/how-to-achieve-academic-excellence/


Via Lucy White, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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A little superficial, but useful.

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Renaissance Florence was a Better Model for innovation than Silicon Valley is - HBR

Renaissance Florence was a Better Model for innovation than Silicon Valley is - HBR | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

 

Urban planners the world over yearn to replicate the success of Silicon Valley: witness Thames Valley (England) and Silicon Oasis (Dubai), to name just two of these attempts. Invariably, these well-intentioned efforts fail for the simple reason that they’re trying to replicate the wrong model. Silicon Valley is too new, too now, to glean lessons from.

 

Chap 1 : Talent needs patronage.

Chap 2 : Mentors matter.

Chap 3 : Potential trumps experience.

Chap 4 : Disaster creates opportunities.

Chap 5 : Embrace competition.

Chap 6 : Seek out and synthesize ideas.


Via Laurent BINDEL
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great article. The premise shakes one up and suggests that a teacher-student relationship is vital. We have created an individual system where cooperation and community are often overlooked as important ingredients.

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Personalize Learning: My Transformation as a Teacher

Personalize Learning: My Transformation as a Teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Pernille Ripp, 7th grade teacher in WI, shares her transformation and pathways to personalized learning environments and passionate learners.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I find I am still becoming a teacher, even after retiring. Transforming is a process that is ongoing. We are always making sense and meaning of what we are, transforming and becoming some one new.

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Suburban Moms Making Unorthodox Choices — Bright — Medium

Suburban Moms Making Unorthodox Choices - Bright - Medium
Welcome to a homeschooling collective that sounds a lot like school.

Via Antonia Rudenstine
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

My experience as a teacher and as a parent who homeschooled a child is home school communities have existed for some time and are important to the success of children and parents.

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Antonia Rudenstine's curator insight, February 3, 8:55 AM

I homeschooled my daughter last year, and it was an incredible learning experience for both of us. The modern, secular homeschooling community should be actively informing "school design" efforts. This post describes Trellis: a homeschooling collective in Massachusetts that is "more like the Google break-room than the one room schoolhouse."  

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Engaging with educational research

Engaging with educational research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This free course, Engaging with educational research, introduces you to the theoretical toolkit that is an essential part of engaging in educational enquiry. You will consider the types of theories...


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article makes it sound like interpretivism and positivism are either/or proposositions. John Dewey suggested we do not live in two separate worlds, subjective and objective, but that those worlds continously interact with each other as we make decisions. The only place we find clear separation, including in research, is in sitcoms like The Big Bang Theory. 

 

It is important for teachers to be familar with educational research and make sense of what outcomes mean in their settings.

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A New Educational System


Via juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Education is process that includes leading children to adulthood and letting go at the right times. This cannot be centralized like we do with school. There is a huge difference.

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High School of the Future? | The Future of K-12 Education

High School of the Future? | The Future of K-12 Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

ast week in New Zealand I visited a high school that may well be the exemplar for global high schools of the future. Hobsonville Point Secondary School (HPSS) on the outskirts of Auckland is just two years old, and only has about 20% of its build-out student population. It has been designed, physically and pedagogically to break virtually every boundary condition of the factory model of education while still meeting all prescribed student performance standards. For example:

 

Students and teachers co-create courses that meet mutual interests and passions while including required standards.The daily schedule is unlike any other I have seen, with time for instruction, community planning, passion-based units, social time, and the other elements of a balanced, deeper learning experience.Adults view their role in a state of constant evolution and professional learning.

 


Via Susan Einhorn, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I glanced at an article today that suggested that all learning is personalized. It is only in that we each learn something different. This article suggests we are always learning and teaching along an intersubjective arc (Emmanual Levinas) with others that shape what we learn, how we experience that learning, and cannot predict what and who will emerge even moments from now.

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Leadership: You can do Anything, but not Everything !

Leadership: You can do Anything, but not Everything ! | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Big B came to office exactly at 9 am and left at 5 pm. Without fail. I remember one day, I panted to his office at 5 pm. He was ready to leave.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I worked for a principal who used to pass himself off as a tech expert. I told him several times I was not an expert and relied on others to help me do what I was not able to do. We could not be experts in everything, but, with the help of others, we can get a lot done.

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Districts work to bolster parent involvement

Districts work to bolster parent involvement | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Traditional parent-teacher conferences may go the way of dial-up internet as administrators experiment with innovative family engagement programs to increase student achievement, experts say.


Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

James Comer's work established this some time ago. Parents and teachers who work along side each other make a difference in children's lives and learning. Parenting and teaching are two forms of pedagogy, leading children into adulthood.

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