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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Business Tips
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Introverts in the Workplace: Why they shouldn't be Underestimated

Introverts in the Workplace: Why they shouldn't be Underestimated | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Introverts have been having a bit of a moment in the spotlight lately. (Ironic, since that’s the place they’re least likely to enjoy themselves.) A few dozen Buzzfeed quizzes, a New York Times be…

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I struggled with my introversion for most of my adult life. I had a few advocates i.e. my spouse who helped me immensely. More recently, several colleagues recognized the strengths I presented and asked for me to use them. One thing about my introversion was, as a teacher, I had empathy for introverted students.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Collaborationweb
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Want To Collaborate Better? Work In A Circle

Want To Collaborate Better? Work In A Circle | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Your environment greatly influences your working disposition. Gather 'round to hear how.

Via Wise Leader™, Luciana Viter, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This makes sense. This way there are no sides.

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John Michel's curator insight, July 15, 2013 8:28 PM

Recent research from two Canadian business schools suggests: If people are sitting in a circle, they're more apt to cooperate, while if they're arranged into rows, they'll become more independent and cutthroat--more of a free-Lancelot, if you would.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You

5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In addition to all of your achievements, you're sure that you're a great boss. After all, your leadership skills have helped you climb the ladder of success. But some of the world's top companies succeed in spite of poor leadership, a result of great products or concepts rather than motivated team members.

 

According to entrepreneurial counselor Michelle McQuaid, bad bosses cost businesses $360 billion in lost productivity every year. The stress caused by difficult supervisors can negatively affect an employee's overall health and workplace morale, eventually driving him or her out the door. Since losing one employee costs a business tens of thousands of dollars or more, your business will eventually suffer financially if you can't keep employee loss at a minimum.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if in School we consider that 1/2 of new teachers leave the profession within 7 years? That does not account for those who obtain a degree and never enter the classroom. What does that mean in relationship to high staff turnover?

 

One way to look at leaders who are not liked is are they leading or managing. We need both, but I found many School managers focused on managing people and avoiding leading.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:50 PM

If you look closely, you may find indications that you're not as popular with your staff as you think you are.

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, August 19, 2014 10:15 PM

PDGLead