Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from educational implications
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Big Brains, Small Minds

Big Brains, Small Minds | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

If we treat the contemplation of the best life as a luxury we cannot afford, seemingly urgent matters will crowd out the truly important ones.

"If the aim of education is to gain money and power, where can we turn for help in knowing what to do with that money and power? Plato knew this firsthand. He had watched as ambition, tied to technological superiority, had led his fellow Athenians to engage in a number of poorly conceived military campaigns, the last of which had allowed the Spartans to lay siege to Athens. In the face of such a ruthless foe, Athens did what any wealthy democracy would do: It built a wall around itself. Some of the walls of the Peloponnesian War are still visible, hastily built out of whatever the Athenians could lay hands on — the remnants of roofs and doorposts — suggesting that some buildings were torn down to make them. That is instructive, if not cautionary. It is often the case that in our attempts to guard ourselves we destroy the very things that we long to protect. Identifying and negotiating these paradoxes is the stuff of a liberal-arts education."


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The article blends Plato and Aristotle. Education is a much broader concept than schooling and school is merely one component. To ask questions in ways that open conversations up and keep them open is a key to all forms of education, including school.
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Sharrock's curator insight, May 16, 2016 9:43 AM
I find that the same argument can be made about dogmatic atheists rejecting religious knowledge. There is a wealth of information available concerning dignity, happiness, meaningful living, ethics and morality (to name just a few). A lot of heavy lifting has already been done. Combining these ideas with religiously-motivated philosophy may advance our understanding of dignity which drives many discussions about rights and culture-building. 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cultural Trendz
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Wise words

Wise words | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Awesome quote! #inspiration


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is a great quote.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 25, 2014 11:53 AM

May your absence be felt. A wonderful weekend to all!

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

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RJ Lavallee's curator insight, February 13, 2015 7:41 AM

Alfie Kohn. Brilliant