Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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Understanding Education in a Changing World: What's Really Worth Learning

Understanding Education in a Changing World: What's Really Worth Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
David Perkins shares insights on helping educators and parents think through the all-important question: “What’s really worth learning?”

Via Nik Peachey, Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

David Jardine used Gadamer to describe the worth of whiling over what is important to teach and learn.

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, February 20, 2016 1:19 PM

This article addresses what are truly important things to learn in today's changing world?

Lihi Telem's curator insight, February 21, 2016 4:11 AM

ראיון מעניין עם דיוויד פרקינס לגבי התוכן והמיומניות שיש ללמד בבתי הספר של היום על מנת שיהיו רלוונטיות לתלמידים בעולם המשתנה של היום ומחר. 

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 24, 2016 12:47 AM

Gosh HASS teachers know all this - and we need to remind ourselves

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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'Genius hour': Students, what would you like to learn today?

Some schools are building in time for students to work on passion projects -- an idea inspired by Google's 20% time.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I think this is workable. As a teacher, I asked students what they wanted to learn and worked with them to connect their ideas to the curricula.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Cultural Trendz
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What is SEL?

What is SEL? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Social and emotional learning involves the processes of developing social and emotional competencies in children. SEL programming is based on the understanding that the best learning emerges in the context of supportive relationships that make learning challenging, engaging, and meaningful; social and emotional skills are critical to being a good student, citizen, and worker; and many different risky behaviors (e.g., drug use, violence, bullying, and dropout) can be prevented or reduced when multi-year, integrated efforts develop students’ social and emotional skills.

This is best done through effective classroom instruction, student engagement in positive activities in and out of the classroom, and broad parent and community involvement in program planning, implementation, and evaluation (Bond & Hauf, 2004; Hawkins, Smith, & Catalano, 2004; Nation et al., 2003; Weare & Nind, 2011). Effective SEL programming begins in preschool and continues through high school. CASEL has identified five interrelated sets of cognitive, affective, and behavioral competencies.

The definitions of the five competency clusters for students are:

* Self-awareness: The ability to accurately recognize one’s emotions and thoughts and their influence on behavior. This includes accurately assessing one’s strengths and limitations and possessing a well-grounded sense of confidence and optimism.

* Self-management: The ability to regulate one’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviors effectively in different situations. This includes managing stress, controlling impulses, motivating oneself, and setting and working toward achieving personal and academic goals.

* Social awareness: The ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others from diverse backgrounds and cultures, to understand social and ethical norms for behavior, and to recognize family, school, and community resources and supports.

* Relationship skills: The ability to establish and maintain healthy and rewarding relationships with diverse individuals and groups. This includes communicating clearly, listening actively, cooperating, resisting inappropriate social pressure, negotiating conflict constructively, and seeking and offering help when needed.
    
* Responsible decision-making: The ability to make constructive and respectful choices about personal behavior and social interactions based on consideration of ethical standards, safety concerns, social norms, the realistic evaluation of consequences of various actions, and the well-being of self and others.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is a good infographic with some detailed explanation.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 17, 2013 10:52 PM

Excellent piece on developing emotional intelligence in children.

Tamra Dollar's curator insight, July 19, 2013 4:53 PM

To be an effective teacher, we must embrace social and emotional learning. If we don't, we might as well be replaced by a piece of computer software!

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Early Learning
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Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"A few years ago, I came across some interesting research by cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg. He claimed that the mark of an expert writer is not years of practice or a hefty vocabulary, but rather an awareness of one’s audience. This made sense to me, and I wondered if it were true in other disciplines as well."


Via Beth Dichter, Agisa Abdulla
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The article provides a broad summary with links and references to studies and work done in specific areas.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Joy Power's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:21 AM

Important research on learning for achievement.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:53 PM

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:51 PM

Research about how self-awareness can help you tap your learning potential

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from www.homeschoolsource.co.uk
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Audrey
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I had a similar conversation yesterday and as I prepare my lit review this thinking has emerged. It is less about content and more about skills, attitudes, habits, practices, etc. in learning.

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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?