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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Open Educational Resources in Higher Education
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University research: if you believe in openness, stand up for it

University research: if you believe in openness, stand up for it | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Publishing openly provides greater exposure, boosts prospects and can lead to more citations, says Erin McKiernan

 

We spend years teaching our children to share. Yet from the moment students enter academia, we discourage it. Lock up your work in prestigious subscription journals; keep your data close to your chest; compete instead of collaborate – these are the messages transmitted by peers and mentors. These are the tenets of our unhealthy academic culture. We need to change our priorities.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sharing our research is important, but forgoing vigor in publishing could be problematic. For example, what makes an open source published article strong? There is a a need to explore something different that allows publication, openness, and vigor.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 24, 12:48 PM

Open Education = Open Research?  Research behind the paywall vs research delivered by keyword search on Google or Bing?

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 27, 11:33 PM

Research and Global Open Access Initiatives

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Educational Books and Scholarly Articles
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A shocking statistic about the quality of education research

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A research study about research studies comes up with a cautionary finding.

 

For more than a decade, school reformers have said that education policy should be driven by “research” and “data,” but there’s a big question about how much faith anyone should have in a great deal of education research. This is so not only because the samples are too small or because some research projects are funded by specific companies looking for specific results, but because in nearly all cases, it appears that nobody can be certain their results are completely accurate.


“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”



Via Gust MEES, ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The concept of replication has never made sense to me. We should be reproducing and reconstructing. Reproducing and reconstructing are not about identical. They are about checking more data against the original data collected. One can never replicate/duplicate the same situation so it is about similarities rather than exactness.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Educate Massachusetts's curator insight, August 22, 11:49 AM

Data is significant yet can be deceptive.  We are developing human potential and there are aspects where data is not as reliable to success as we portray.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 23, 8:42 AM

This article is about the low value placed on replication studies. It does not call into question all education research! I'd like to see how this replication issue compares to other social sciences before dismissing all ed research! 

Dylan-oliver Sinclair's curator insight, August 24, 7:48 PM

What information should be taught in schools and universities? This topic is suggesting marketing companies have influence over learning and teaching.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This looks like an interesting article.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Edu-Vision- Educational Leadership
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School Starts Too Early

School Starts Too Early | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The later high school classes start in the morning, the more academic performance improves

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Why don't we change? This is something so-called reformers can change if they have the will.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 25, 4:24 AM

We knew this, didn't we?  Adolescent brain research supports it.

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, August 27, 12:36 PM

We often take school schedules as being fixed without questioning why they are as they are and if they meet the needs of our students.   Looking at the needs and natural dispositions of student as the basis for planning can lead to some very interesting innovations in how, where, and when we teach and learn.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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How people argue with research they don’t like

How people argue with research they don’t like | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If you ever need to rebut a study whose conclusion you don't like, just follow this simple flowchart.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Research results always have to be taken with a grain of salt.

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Sharrock's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:26 AM

Great responses. Great flowchart.