Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Teaching Tidbits: Teaching Is Like a Sushi Roll

Teaching Tidbits: Teaching Is Like a Sushi Roll | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Anabel Gonzalez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is an interesting metaphor to consider. It is actually a simile.
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Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning

Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog

 

"One of the best gifts teachers can give students are the experiences that open their eyes to themselves as learners. Most students don’t think much about how they learn. Mine used to struggle to write a paragraph describing the study approaches they planned to use in my communication courses. However, to be fair, I’m not sure I had a lot of insights about my learning when I was a student. Did you?
As fall courses start to wind down, it’s an apt time for reflection. Here are some pithy (I hope) prompts that might motivate students to consider their beliefs about learning."


Via Dennis T OConnor, Audrey
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers and students require time to reflect. We should be creating classrooms which reflect a phenomenological experiencing of teaching and learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Audrey's curator insight, November 27, 2014 12:15 PM
Questions such as the two below are very helpful in getting students to think about their own learning and to take responsibility rather than waiting for the teacher to always direct them: Say, for example, you don’t think you’re any good at math, or that you can’t write or draw, what happens when you have to do these things? Does what you believe about yourself as a learner have any effect on how you perform?Have you ever learned something you didn’t think you could learn? What? How did you feel once you had learned it?

 

 I recently asked students to do work they had not been asked previously to do.  The result was:  all 13 students performed very well. They had to write and think in different ways. I asked them to write an essay in 25 minutes on a topic they had not previously studied.  

 

The other topic was: to make sentences using homonyns.   A  homonyn is a word that is spelt the same or sounds the same as another word but is different in meaning, e.g. ate and eight; berry and bury; red and read.  

 

Although the majority of the students were foreign and were learning English as a second language, they were able to complete the task exceptionally well.  They were allowed to work in twos but none of them consulted a dictionary.  All of them completed 10 sentences using homonyns such as:   bore/boar; birth/berth; bald/bawled; pray/prey; principle/principal; missed/mist, etc ....without asking me the meanings.

 

What this demonstrates is that in the right environment / atmosphere a person will  use their brain processes.  What educators should always be doing is encouraging the intake of knowledge in a variety of contexts, situations: students should visit museums,  banks to learn real mathematics; House of Parliament to question politicians, etc....

 

Learn psychology on http://www.hotmoodle.com

Jose Pietri's curator insight, December 5, 2014 5:39 AM

Usable in LEC and other self-learning based approaches. 

media350's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:58 AM

 A list of well crafted and thought provoking prompts for reflection.

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Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Critical thought is a cognitive process that proposes the systematic analysis of information, opinion and statements that we accept in our daily life as valid or true. It is a basic skill for a competent, free and responsible citizen."


Via Beth Dichter, The Rice Process, Malachy Scullion
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A word other than debate, which suggests binaries of right and wrong, might be David Bohm's concept of dialogue where there is an allowance for different and reasonable perspectives. It fits with the ideas of Paulo Freire.

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 18, 2014 8:35 AM

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Susan Walker-Meere's curator insight, November 9, 2014 12:49 PM

I would add: Trans-disciplinary thinking; systems thinking for sustainability. Most people can not see the forest through the trees so miss the larger connections of the impacts that action, goods & services have on both environmental systems and human systems. 

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, November 16, 2014 3:48 PM

La pensée critique, une competence clé du 21ème siècle avec tant d'information qui nous arrive. 

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Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness

Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Through being reflective about your own teaching practices, model and guide students toward a more reflective approach to their projects, grades, actions, and reactions.

Via Amy Burns
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
As I interview teachers, the role of reflection is very important to their pedagogic practices. It takes on many different modes: writing, driving to and from work, listening purposefully, etc. It is not a one-size-fits-all.
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Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder'

Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Research shows that reflecting after learning something new makes it stick in your brain.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An important aspect of reflecting and learning is getting beyond what went well and, even when we think we have succeeded, look for the things that were different about this learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 30, 2014 12:28 PM

excerpt:

"Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows. In “Learning by Thinking: How Reflection Aids Performance,” a team of researchers from HEC Paris, Harvard Business School, and the University of North Carolina describe what they call the first empirical test of the effect of reflection on learning. By “reflection,” they mean taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract, or articulate the important points."

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:46 PM

Reflection is crucial.  If we don't take time to reflect, we don't take time to improve.