Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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The Truth about “Good” Schools

When I posted about how political and media labels of "good" and "bad" schools are significantly misleading—more about race and class than the actual quality of the schools—I received a request to identify some "good" schools. Here is the disturbing truth about "good" schools: Among formal schools, both public and private, there are no "good…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Good teachers take responsible risks and invite students into taking responsible risks. I don't know that good teachers are given permission by others to take risks. They assume that reponsibiliy and autonomy. Does having a good teacher in a school mean it is a good school? Likely not; I experienced good teaching as being marginalized and on the margins. What we mistake for good teaching is people who so well they reinforce the wrong things.
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Is the Purpose of Teaching Student Learning or Student Grading? | Pedablogy: Musings on the Art & Craft of Teaching

Is the purpose of teaching student learning or student grading? I don’t believe that you can have it both ways. That is, grading, at least the way it’s commonly done, inhibits student learning. This is not merely my idea. David Brooks wrote a piece in the NYTabout this, saying “We all know why it exists, but the grade-point average is one of the more destructive elements in American education. In life we want independent thinking and risk-taking, but the GPA system encourages students to be deferential and risk averse, giving their teachers what they want.“
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Maybe it is neither. Instead is it about relationships?
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 23, 6:25 PM

Interesting stuff. Thanks to Ivon Prefontaine. 

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Disrupt Assessment — Learning {Re}imagined

Disrupt Assessment - Learning {Re}imagined - Medium
It’s like the 21st century never happened
Via Bookmarking Librarian
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The article underscores the importance of the question: "What is the purpose of school? Or, more succinctly: "What is school?" From their flows as many answers as people who answer.
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Academia = Lifetime of Homework

Academia = Lifetime of Homework | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I don’t know why it’s taken me so long to figure this out… But choosing an academic life seems to mean accepting (embracing?) a lifetime of homework. I mean, I sort of understood …

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
As we corporatize and monetize teaching and learning even more, this is the reality. Teachers become teachers to pursue passions, but it is not about work. It is about taking action in the Hannah Arendt sense.
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Education Readings May 20th

Education Readings May 20th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Sorry, Nicky, I’m out. An English teacher writes an open letter of resignation to UK Secretary of Education Nicky Morgan. If you think your version of GERM is bad, I’d suggest that England possibly tops the…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The link to an article based on Seymour Papert's recent book is worth following. An arguement is made that a focus on testing narrows curriculum and that we are focused on an unquestioned following of the 3 R's without asking what that means in contemporary schooling.
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Teaching the Teachers

Teaching the Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Recent education reforms have urged teachers to foster collaboration, debate and reflection among students, in order to develop cognitive processes like those called for in the new standards. Ironically, districts rarely apply these same learning techniques to developing teachers. At the same time, teacher’s performance is increasingly tied to their students. This is a disparity that must be corrected.


Via Nik Peachey, Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching teachers is a key to the future of schooling. It is not enough to simply reform what we do and move deck chairs around a sinking ship. Teachers exist in transformational pedagogic relationships with students. It is a myth that we only play dual roles with students. We engage in multiple roles in living a full and complete life that informs who we are as teachers and learners.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 20, 1:05 AM

A 42 page ebook report and recommendations on teacher development.

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The only real test

The only real test | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Aussie Friends of Treehorn protecting school children from nasty excesses of the greedy and misguided encouraging adults to think sensitively, to care for kids, to make wise choices....with their hearts in gear, their pens active and their votes available.   The Only Real Test “The only real test is whether children are happy and healthy writes…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
"Our mission as adults is to protect our children from politicians. We also have an ethical and moral responsibility to tell business people to stay out of our building.” Any Finnish citizen is free to visit any school whenever they like, but her message was clear : Educators are the ultimate authorities on education, not bureaucrats, and not technology vendors.”

This is a universal message that needs to be at the entrance of every school. It is the people who teach and parent each day who have the best insight into the pedagogic relationships children are most in need of.
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leading and learning: Michael Fullan in 'Rich Seams' an educational transformation? and Pearson's role in education

leading and learning: Michael Fullan in 'Rich Seams' an educational transformation? and Pearson's role in education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I agree we are overdue for transforming schools, but that is not an abstract exercise undertaken by those furthest away from classrooms. Pedagogy and pedagogic relationships are the most important parts of transforming teaching and learning. Having said this, with schools that look and feel much like they did 20 and 40 years ago we need leadership that works with teachers and students in honest ways. Corporatizing schools and quick fix solutions are not the answer.
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What Does It Mean to Be Well-Educated? (**)

What Does It Mean to Be Well-Educated - Alfie Kohn
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This article fits with the one I just curated from Elke. The question is important as it takes us beyond just the schooling we receive and what that means.
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Personalize Learning: Making the Shift to "Our" Classroom

Personalize Learning: Making the Shift to "Our" Classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Brian Anton, high school social studies teacher, shares how he had to change so his learners could drive their learning.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Sharing the classroom is important for student and teacher voice to emerge. Taking it one step further, what if teacher voice were encouraged in schools?
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 14, 9:16 PM

One of the most difficult parts of our jobs as educators is to create a learning environment where our learners are engaged and meet content and curriculum goals. From my experience, the single most important challenge that needs to be addressed to earn engagement in our classrooms is to develop a culture of learner autonomy--allowing and encouraging learners to take control of their own learning. There are many barriers that we, as educators, must work to clear in order to create a strong culture that allows our learners to feel comfortable with working toward a common goal in the way that works best for them.


- See more at: http://www.personalizelearning.com/2016/02/making-shift-to-our-classroom.html#sthash.Fe2mNysX.dpuf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/12/27/what-are-the-best-ways-of-teaching-and-learning-ideas-and-reflections/

 

Robert Dart's curator insight, May 15, 8:19 PM
Must investigate further
Helen Teague's curator insight, May 22, 10:26 AM
Kathleen McClaskey's insight: Brian shares how he transformed his classroom to a learner-centered environment and what happened in the process with his learners. Here is a glimpse of his journey: "As teachers, it is difficult to let go of control and to let our learners find the best ways for them to achieve content and curriculum goals. To be clear, our role in the classroom needs to change, and I think the trend in education is moving the correct direction--achieving and creating a learner-driven, personalized atmosphere is the key. Providing learners with the tools to succeed should be the goal, and we should focus on allowing them to use those tools in the way that works best individually. Instead of providing the blueprint for learners to achieve a goal, educators should be allowing and guiding them in designing, developing, and implementing their plan for accomplishing it. When this happens, drastic changes take place regarding engagement in our classrooms and ownership of learning appears, leading to a higher level of achievement."
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What the Greatest Coach Can Teach Us

What the Greatest Coach Can Teach Us | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As a former high school English teacher, John Wooden always thought of himself as a teacher rather than a coach, and the basketball court was his classroom. He championed teaching, believing that it contributes more to society than any other profession. His teams dominated college basketball throughout the 1960s and 70s, accomplishing an incredible run of 10…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
John Wooden's book They Call Coach is a worthwhile read for teachers, parents, and coaches. What could supposed leaders learn from this great coach and person?
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Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization 

Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What Really Lies Behind the Procrastination?

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is a need to be attentive and present to the task at hand. In a world filled with distractions, it is easy to become sidetracked.
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 12, 9:46 AM
(From the article): So, how do you slay the procrastination demon in your organization? As a leader, you must help people overcome any fear that may be preventing them from taking action. Teach them to block tasks together, scheduling small chunks of time where they allow for brief periods of distraction before getting back on task without interruption. Clearly communicate direction to your employees, work together to develop a plan that is broken down into milestones, and then hold people accountable for sticking to the plan. Don’t allow important tasks to get buried underneath layers of busy work. Help employees to recognize when procrastination has become a habit. Set clear objectives and timelines to keep employees on task and on target. Educate employees and managers about the symptoms, causes, and consequences of persistent procrastination. Has it become a habit? Get started today and slay the demon.
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What if young people designed their own learning?

What if young people designed their own learning? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Our education system fails to amplify students' creativity and interest in learning. To continue along the current path is increasingly unscientific, unjustifiable and plain dull.

Via Peter Mellow, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is important to include students in their learning. The challenge is that many teachers feel excluded so what does that mean?
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 11, 6:23 PM

Cool stuff! Thanks to Juan Doming.

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How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It

How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

For the past twenty years, I have been carrying out experiments to find out how power is distributed in groups. I have infiltrated college dorms and children’s summer camps to document who rises in power. I have brought entire sororities and fraternities into the lab, capturing the substance and spread of individuals’ reputations within their social networks. I have surreptitiously identified which members of groups are gossiped about, and who receive gossip. To chart the experience of power, I have studied what it feels like to be placed in positions of authority.

Findings from this research converge on an organizing idea: Whereas the Machiavellian approach to power assumes that individuals grab it through coercive force, strategic deception, and the undermining of others, the science finds that power is not grabbed but is given to individuals by groups.
What this means is that your ability to make a difference in the world—your power, as I define it—is shaped by what other people think of you. Your capacity to alter the state of others depends on their trust in you. Your ability to empower others depends on their willingness to be influenced by you. Your power is constructed in the judgments and actions of others. When they grant you power, they increase your ability to make their lives better—or worse.


Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Leading is about listening and stepping aside when it is necessary. When we experience leadership as an assigned role, that is when problems arise and abuse of power occurs. What do we see in schools?
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David Hain's curator insight, May 23, 8:57 AM

Givers always gain, and it seems from exhaustive research that power may be one of the things they gain from giving!

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Who Are the Main Education Stakeholders?

Who Are the Main Education Stakeholders? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
 A main cause behind the globalization of higher education, and business schools in particular, is the internationalization of stakeholders. Marshall McLuhan’s global village has its global school
Via Ines Bieler, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a neo-liberal way of understanding schools as corporate entities. Where are the community and parents in this scheme?
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Paying Students May Raise Test Scores, But The Lesson Is Not Over

Paying Students May Raise Test Scores, But The Lesson Is Not Over | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A research finding may have implications for attaching stakes to standardized tests. It also brings up questions about motivation — for tomorrow's test and for the rest of the students' education.

Via Parent Cortical Mass, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This might be true if the only motives are extrinsic. But, what if learning were the motive? What if students enjoyed coming to school and learning? What if teachers were able to share their passion with others in meaningful and uplifting ways?
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What metrics don't tell us about the way students learn

What metrics don't tell us about the way students learn | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Plans to reward universities for excellent teaching could see a bigger role for metrics that track how students spend their time.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching is about relationships with students that inform teachers about who the person is. Metrics are averages and quantify people which is not what we want. We want to talk and listen to a who, not a what.
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The knowledge economy is a myth. We don’t need more universities to feed it | Andre Spicer

The knowledge economy is a myth. We don’t need more universities to feed it | Andre Spicer | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Most new jobs now do not require degree-level qualifications. Encouraging more young people to graduate will create only debt and disappointment"


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Friday, May 20, 2016


"The “knowledge economy” is a myth, writes Guardian contributor “The idea of the knowledge economy is appealing,” writes Andre Spicer for The Guardian, but “the only problem is it is largely a myth.” The author argues that while many western countries are working to produce more university graduates, the truth is that “developed western economies … are not brimming with jobs that require degree-level qualifications. For every job as a skilled computer programmer, there are three jobs flipping burgers.” Spicer adds that no matter which country one looks at, the areas of highest employment growth are ones that do not require a large-scale bolstering of university education. In fact, Spicer argues, there has been a marked decline in demand for knowledge-intensive jobs since 2000, and it is these jobs that are under threat of being automated, not low-skilled ones."


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Perhaps a better way to understand the "knowledge economy" is twofold. First, teachers teach students where they exist with an eye on skills and content that are transportable into an unpredictable future. Second, stop with the 'neo-liberal economic' agenda directing schools and what happens in them. Education is not a business.
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What provokes your thinking?

What provokes your thinking? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
  PLEASE SHARE WITH AS MANY PARENTS’ GROUPS AS POSSIBLE  Aussie Friends of Treehorn   protecting school children from nasty excesses of the greedy and misguided. What is your stimulous ? What provokes your thinking? I confess to listening to speakers who know what is going on  and who challenge any evil in it. Here…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There are two excellent videos linked in the post (Ken Robinson and Pasi Sahlberg).
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Amplifying empathy in teachers can help prevent student suspensions, researchers find — NewsWorks

Amplifying empathy in teachers can help prevent student suspensions, researchers find — NewsWorks | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
School suspension rates have risen in recent years And since the punishment is linked to more severe problems later in life such as dropping out of school or ending up in prison researchers at
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I am not sure about training teachers in empathy. I suppose it might help. I find that we learn empathy and sympathy as we experience living. Good pedagogy involves senstive and tactful practices that encounters students as people with names, faces, and stories.
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Twelve questions to promote self-knowledge in students

Twelve questions to promote self-knowledge in students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"What is self-knowledge, and what is the relationship between it and education? Twelve questions can help make the connection ..."


Via Leona Ungerer, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
If we apply a servant-leadership way of understanding teaching, the objective of teaching becomes students who grow, become wiser, and are always learning in meaningful ways that make the world a better place.
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Kathleen Petrie's curator insight, May 18, 3:42 AM
A list of simple questions that students can ask themselves.  
Megan Walker's curator insight, May 25, 12:47 AM
12 questions for students that can possibly help enhance their potential in and out of the classroom.
Megan Walker's comment, May 25, 12:57 AM
This is not only beneficial for students, but for anyone. If genuine thought was put into answering these questions on a regular basis, we can all strongly enhance our knowledge and learn on a whole new level.
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leading and learning: Grit/ Pasi Salberg/ Literacy/ Finland/Coding/Smart Schools

leading and learning: Grit/ Pasi Salberg/ Literacy/ Finland/Coding/Smart Schools | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The article about pictures being conversation starters struck a chord. An art teacher recently told me she used art and images to teach history through art.
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Radical Wisdom for a Company, a School, a Life

What if your job didn’t control your life? Brazilian CEO Ricardo Semler practices a radical form of corporate democracy, rethinking everything from board meetings to how workers report their vacation days (they don’t have to). 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
His book Maverick is a great read. He proposes sitting together, talking with each other, and listening to each other. The corporate rules are 21 captioned cartoons.
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David Hain's curator insight, December 4, 2015 8:06 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

Hector Cortez's curator insight, March 23, 12:19 AM

Required viewing to make you think, even if you don't go a quarter as far as Semler has!

David Hain's curator insight, May 14, 6:35 AM

All leaders should review Semlers work, even if they disagree with it!

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Education Readings May 13th

Education Readings May 13th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz The scientific case for doodling while taking notes As I noted last week, Tony Buzan will be saying ‘I told you.’ “Using simple words and pictures helps us to see connections between pieces of information,…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The interview with Pasi Salhberg is interesting. The question that leads to him expanding on Big Data in schooling is worth reading and let soak in. It is about standardizing what teachers do and bypassing details that tell us about who we educate and the relationships teaching is founded on.
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Teaching comes with great power

Teaching comes with great power | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many attribute the quote: “With great power comes great responsibility” to Spiderman or more specifically his Uncle Ben. Stan Lee wrote the comic, and originally it showed up in a narra…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching remains important. It provides the human contact and relationships that instrumental methods (i.e. computers, books, curriculum guides, etc.) cannot. Pedagogy remains central to teaching and learning.
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