Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Early Learning
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Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"A few years ago, I came across some interesting research by cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg. He claimed that the mark of an expert writer is not years of practice or a hefty vocabulary, but rather an awareness of one’s audience. This made sense to me, and I wondered if it were true in other disciplines as well."


Via Beth Dichter, Agisa Abdulla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article provides a broad summary with links and references to studies and work done in specific areas.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Joy Power's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:21 AM

Important research on learning for achievement.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:53 PM

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:51 PM

Research about how self-awareness can help you tap your learning potential

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
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Learning to Learn - The Link

Learning to Learn - The Link | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Link
Learning to Learn
The Link
In 1956, a committee of educators, chaired by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, produced a classification of educational objectives.

Via John R. Walkup, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We can and students can. Bloom is rarely used in schools today.  We do critical thinking as a rote process and then wonder why students are not very adept at it. I used Bloom's regularly in the design of rubrics and discussed that with students.

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John R. Walkup's curator insight, January 7, 2014 12:51 PM

Interesting discussion about Bloom's Taxonom yaimed at the university level.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Linguagem Virtual
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Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Vanderbilt University

 

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.

 

Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks."


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Emotional intelligence and learning how to learn might be the two most important teaching work we do for children. It is about connecting with what is important in healthy ways and understanding learning more completely. We can never do this completely, but we should make the effort.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 2014 9:13 AM

Four assignments for explicit instruction:


  1. Preassessments—Encouraging Students to Examine Their Current Thinking
  2. The Muddiest Point—Giving Students Practice in Identifying Confusions
  3. Retrospective Postassessments—Pushing Students to Recognize Conceptual Change
  4. Reflective Journals—Providing a Forum in Which Students Monitor Their Own Thinking




Nicola Parkin's curator insight, July 28, 2014 7:35 PM

Nice! 4 strategies for helping learner learn to learn.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Robert Fisher Teaching Thinking homepage

This article explores what metacognition is, why it is important and how it develops in children. It argues that teachers need to help children develop metacognitive awareness, and identifies the factors which enhance metacognitive development. Metacognitive thinking is a key element in the transfer of learning. The child's development of metacognitive skills is defined as meta-learning. Meta-teaching strategies can help mediate the metacognitive skills of children, help to stimilate children's metacognitive thinking. The article draws upon reserch currently being undertaken in London schools on raising achievement in thinking and learning through developing the metacognition of children as learners in schools.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This looks like an interesting article.

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