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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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The Learning Myth: Why I'm Cautious About Telling My Son He's Smart

The Learning Myth: Why I'm Cautious About Telling My Son He's Smart | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By: Salman Khan
Join the #YouCanLearnAnything movement


My 5-year-­old son has just started reading. Every night, we lie on his bed and he reads a short book to me. Inevitably, he’ll hit a word

Via diane gusa, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I was an early reader and yet I did not read. I memorized what older brothers and parents read to me from the picture book. I could repeat the story verbatim. I am not sure a five year old not recognizing the word gratefully is a problem. Where will they be as a reader later is the key.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder'

Study: You Really Can 'Work Smarter, Not Harder' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Research shows that reflecting after learning something new makes it stick in your brain.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An important aspect of reflecting and learning is getting beyond what went well and, even when we think we have succeeded, look for the things that were different about this learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 30, 12:28 PM

excerpt:

"Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows. In “Learning by Thinking: How Reflection Aids Performance,” a team of researchers from HEC Paris, Harvard Business School, and the University of North Carolina describe what they call the first empirical test of the effect of reflection on learning. By “reflection,” they mean taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract, or articulate the important points."

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, July 31, 11:46 PM

Reflection is crucial.  If we don't take time to reflect, we don't take time to improve.

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A Wonderful Poster on Failure

A Wonderful Poster on Failure | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Making mistakes is most often not fatal. An open mindset is important, but we live in a world where numbers drive learning and living.

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Sayward Henry's curator insight, July 15, 1:10 PM

Fail Again. Fail Better.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, July 25, 11:52 AM

This is an ideal image for my use when discussing "Failure".  When working with my pre-service students as well as teachers in PD sessions, I explain "FAIL" as First Attempt In Learning.  This image will provide authentic connections for those involved in our discussion.  

Sue Alexander's curator insight, August 23, 8:50 PM

Such an important message for inspiring fearlessness.

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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

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Would You Want Your Child In This Exquisitely-Managed Classroom?

Would You Want Your Child In This Exquisitely-Managed Classroom? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The First Day Of School In A 9th Grade Classroom That Runs Like Clockwork: A Video Of Classroom Management We don’t talk much about classroom management here at TeachThought. (Well, sometimes we do.) First and...

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

No. Teaching and learning are messy. They are not managed.

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, October 16, 2013 6:18 AM

This video is worth gold in terms of potential for GOOD conversation about what we value as educators.  Are there pros?  Are there cons?  Would pros and cons vary, depending on the students?  

Sharrock's curator insight, April 22, 3:48 PM
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's insight:

This video is worth gold in terms of potential for GOOD conversation about what we value as educators.  Are there pros?  Are there cons?  Would pros and cons vary, depending on the students?  

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10,000 Hours to Mastery: The Gladwell Effect on Learning Design

10,000 Hours to Mastery: The Gladwell Effect on Learning Design | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I just finished reading Malcom Gladwell’s latest book, Outliers. In one of its chapters, he explains the 10,000-hour rule.

 

Great book.  I saw this come alive in my son who, at 16 "wanted to be a musician" but was going through a period where hanging out with friends was all he could think about.  Having read the book, I challenged him to the 10,000 hours premise (and asked that if he wanted my backing on the music, he had to Prove to me his sincerity).  Well.........he became hyperfocused at that point and indeed, mastered percussion in ways that astounded me.  

 

Practice.  A vital piece of mastery.  Without time on task, you have mediocrity.  


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When I coached hockey, I used to tell my players and parents that if you practice something well for 10, 000 hours expect good results. If you practice something poorly for 10, 000 hours, expect frustration and poor results. I think when people realize doing something well requires commitment and perseverance to practice they can become enlivened in their learning.

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Peering into Learning | Peeragogy.org

Peering into Learning | Peeragogy.org | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In this part of the Peeragogy Handbook, we “peeragogues” have summarised the most important and applicable research and insights from two years of inquiry and discussion. Although there’s been no shortage of experimentation and formal research into collaborative, connective, and shared learning systems in the past, there is a new rumbling among education thinkers that suggests that when combined with new platforms and technologies, peer-learning strategies as described here could have a huge impact on the way educational institutions evolve in the future. We’ve also seen for ourselves how peer-learning techniques can help anyone who’s interested to become a more effective informal educator.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is not producing. It is an act of praxis which involves forming. We do not produce students as finished products. They and teachers are always forming. This is much closer to Dewey and Vygotsky than it is to Plato and other Greek philosophers.

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mercè perelló's curator insight, March 16, 4:15 AM

"Technology can, to some degree and in certain contexts, replace “know how” with “know where to look.”

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We Have 21st Century Learners Who Need 21st Century Leaders

We Have 21st Century Learners Who Need 21st Century Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We must lead the shift to a way that maximizes opportunities for investigation, problem solving, and collaboration while maintaining assurance that each child is gaining knowledge, and is able to apply it both alone and with others.

Via Pierre Levy, Gust MEES, Jenn Alevy
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

But, we are almost 15% of the way into the century. Why has it not happened? And, it has not. Not even where I used to work.

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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, February 10, 11:33 AM

Excellent argument and validation for Instructional Leaders to be at the forefront of the cutting edge in instruction.  That involves conceptual learning, instructional technology that redefines the learning, and quality instructional implementation both in classrooms and in professional development.

Allan Shaw's curator insight, February 10, 4:39 PM

It is wise not to allow allow large dichotomies, perhaps false dichotomies to dominate this debate. Critical thinking, collaborative work and knowledge of content are all important and attainable for good teachers, as they have been. It is a matter of emphasis. Check

http://sco.lt/7MGCh7 ;

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Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Critical thought is a cognitive process that proposes the systematic analysis of information, opinion and statements that we accept in our daily life as valid or true. It is a basic skill for a competent, free and responsible citizen."


Via Beth Dichter, The Rice Process, Malachy Scullion
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A word other than debate, which suggests binaries of right and wrong, might be David Bohm's concept of dialogue where there is an allowance for different and reasonable perspectives. It fits with the ideas of Paulo Freire.

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Carole Maurage's curator insight, February 6, 6:40 AM

L'éducation qui appelle le cerveau entier à se mobiliser, c'est à dire le gauche ET le droit, qui est aussi relié à l'émotionnel.

L'école du futur, c'est le monde entier : "the whole world's a classroom" comme le dit Marina Gorbis @mgorbis @iftf  http://www.iftf.org/?id=70

Les nouveaux comportements liés aux usages du numérique font, enfin, bouger l'éducation (du moins on l'espère...)

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, March 10, 12:37 PM

It is a basic skill for a competent, free and responsible 21st century citizen.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 18, 8:35 AM

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

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What Motivates Learners to Want to Learn?

What Motivates Learners to Want to Learn? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Hear four kids talk about motivation and Kathleen Cushman's information about the conditions for motivation in the webinar and chat.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, Audrey
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

John Dewey called what motivates people to learn is "living motivation". We bring our stories and autobiographies to learning every day. We want to add to them in ways that help us construct a future of our choosing that fits within a community. It is about constantly transforming who we are.

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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, January 23, 10:06 AM

Have you ever wondered about motivation and what motivates us to learn? Kathleen Cushman presented in our Personalize Learning Webinar Series on Tues. January 21st by explaining that you start by drawing a straight line between... 


> what young people tell us about their learning experiences; 

> your own practice as educators and; 

> compelling scientific research into mind, brain, and education. 

 

Then she shared the eight simple rules of thumb that help us create the conditions for high motivation and high levels of mastery in the your learning environments!  - See more at: http://www.personalizelearning.com/2014/01/what-motivates-learners-to-want-to-learn.html#sthash.yBN3OEq0.dpuf

Audrey's curator insight, January 28, 5:36 PM

It is important to hear from the learners how they are stimulated to absorb information. The earlier this is encouraged the greater the brain power, audrey@homeschoolsource.co.uk

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Presentation & Motivation Zen: Sir Ken Robinson Gives Best Talk Yet, TED & Education

Presentation & Motivation Zen: Sir Ken Robinson Gives Best Talk Yet, TED & Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Creativity and education expert Sir Ken Robinson delivered two amazingly popular TED Talks prior to his newest, and what could be his best to date in 2013.

 

Excerpted from a Garr Reynolds post:

 

_________________________
   
Good presentation is a balance of information, persuasion, and inspiration... [to] light a spark and point the way.

     

_________________________

    

His first talk http://bit.ly/1fjhkH6 —presented sans multimedia in the true Sir Ken Robinson style — was made in 2006 and is the most viewed TED talk of all time.

 

His follow-up talk given in 2010 http://bit.ly/1f6zZp2 also has been downloaded millions of times.

 

I have seen Sir Ken speak many times and he is always inspiring and engaging, but his latest TED talk, http://bit.ly/IEXH0Q presented at TED Talks Education in April of this year, is my favorite yet.

Good presentation is a balance of information, persuasion, and inspirationPresentations related to leadership must necessarily light a spark and point the way

  

Sir Ken does not scream or jump up and down but he nonetheless ignites, provokes, and inspires his live audience, and anyone else who cares to listen to his presentation on line, in a meaningful and memorable way.

 

Millions of people have seen his latest talk, but just in case you have not, please set aside about 20 minutes to watch this outstanding, short TED talk."

 


Via John Evans, juandoming, Deb Nystrom, REVELN, simondcollins
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sir Ken is always a good listen and viewing.

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, December 25, 2013 3:27 PM

Sir Ken certainly has a lot to say about education. It is important to listen to voices that challenge you. 

simondcollins's curator insight, January 20, 6:11 AM

The brilliant Sir Ken Robinson.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, January 22, 5:57 PM

Fabulous presenter making some excellent points about education.

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10 Social Media Skills for The 21st Century Teachers | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Social Media Skills for The 21st Century Teachers | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The potential of social networking sites in education is huge and we need to capitalize on it to enhance our professional development and consequently improve the quality of our instruction. Searching for articles on this topic , I came across Doug Johnson's post on the 10 social media competencies for teachers [http://doug-johnson.squarespace.com/blue-skunk-blog/2010/7/31/top-ten-social-media-competencies-for-teachers.html ]. I like the competencies Doug included and decided to make an infographic featuring all of these skills.  Have a look and share with your colleagues.


Via Elizabeth E Charles, Sarah McElrath, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is balanced against the use of 'traditional' ways of learning i.e. reading, writing, art, etc.

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WEAC's curator insight, January 21, 11:57 AM

From identifying the best educational tools to managing your online reputation, this is a great social media checklist for educators.

Epict Italia's curator insight, January 25, 3:47 AM

Le competenze del docente che usa strumenti "Social"
1) Aiutare gli studenti a utilizzare gli strumeti di betworking per trovare informazioni e comunicare in rete con esperti, pari, docenti
2) Conoscere le principali categorier del Web 2.0 e gli strmenti utili per la didattica. COnoscere gli sturmenti a disposizione e utilizzabili nella propria scuola
3) Utilizzare strumenti di rete per comunicare con i colleghi, studenti e genitori
4) Navigare, valutare e creare contenuti su siti social (prezi, slideshaer,..)
5) Utilizzare gli strumenti sociali per creare, mantenere e imparare in una personale rete di apprendmento
6) COnoscere le regle di netiquette e gli standard di comportamento eticon in rete
7) Conoscere e insegnare le regole sul copyright e le questioni di pricacy in rete
8) COmprendere e insegnare l'impolrtanza della gestione dell'identità e della reputazione in rete
9) Scegliere e seguire un personale piano di autoformazione per rimanere infomrato su nuovi strumenti e applicazioni
10) Partecipare nella definizione a livello di Scuola delle regole di utilizzo degli strumenti social

chua meng joo's curator insight, February 3, 11:06 PM

For development of our teachers.

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Learning to Learn - The Link

Learning to Learn - The Link | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Link
Learning to Learn
The Link
In 1956, a committee of educators, chaired by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom, produced a classification of educational objectives.

Via John R. Walkup, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We can and students can. Bloom is rarely used in schools today.  We do critical thinking as a rote process and then wonder why students are not very adept at it. I used Bloom's regularly in the design of rubrics and discussed that with students.

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John R. Walkup's curator insight, January 7, 12:51 PM

Interesting discussion about Bloom's Taxonom yaimed at the university level.

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Next Gen Learning Boosts Rigor, Relevance & Relationships

Next Gen Learning Boosts Rigor, Relevance & Relationships | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Don't miss this post! Tom Vander Ark explains how innovations in learning are supporting great learning environments for students &teachers.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think vigour is a better word than rigor which comes with mortis and makes the term rigor mortis. Also, it is like we are just discovering vigour, relevancy, and relationships are important. Dewey wrote about them long ago.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know...

Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

So here is my list of what I want all new teachers to know:

 

1) - It's Ok to look and feel like this. If being scared wasn't supposed to happen from time to time, then we wouldn't be human. Don't be afraid of what you don't know and aren't sure about. Take everything in stride and accept that you are going to make mistakes. The key is making sure you learn from those mistakes.

2) - Find time during your off period to go observe other classrooms in your building. Even if the content and/or age group are different, there is still a lot you can learn via simple observation. If possible, see if that teacher would be willing to sit and talk with you about what you saw in their classroom. Even better, invite them to observe your classroom and get feedback/input on what they saw in your classroom.

3) - Focus on building relationships with your students from day one. Don't worry about your content at first, you most likely just spent the last four years of your life learning about it. Spend the first few weeks learning about the lives of the students you have in front of you. The more you learn about your students the more they will learn about your content.

4) - Don't worry about discipline and punishing kids; worry about how to provide strong instruction and an engaging classroom environment. This is basically being proactive rather than reactive. A classroom that is engaging with strong instructional practices is a classroom with few discipline problems.

5) - Learn the names and show the utmost respect to every administrative assistant, custodial/maintenance and food service employee in your building. They will help you more than you could ever imagine... trust me on this.

6) - Don't be afraid to speak up and share an idea. You most likely weren't hired because you were the worst candidate, so at some point in time somebody saw something great about you. You bring a new perspective and a fresh set of lenses to the table, so be sure to share your thoughts and insights in a collaborative and collegial manner.

7) - Don't try to do everything on your own. Don't simply shut your door and teach. Work with those who have more experience and know the system. Find a few people whom you can trust, and lean on them.

8) - Be careful of the teacher's lounge and watch out for 'that group.' The teacher's lounge can be the type of environment that just beats you down and makes you feel like the world is a terrible place. This is not always the case, but be aware that these black holes do exist from time to time. Also, every school has 'the group.' You might not notice the group at first because they are always looking for new members (specifically new teachers). Try to avoid this group at all costs.

9) - Having fun on the weekends is all good and is frankly healthy, but be sure to keep your image clean and professional. More employees get in trouble for the silly and not so smart things they do online than for most other reasons. Be safe and have a healthy career/life balance, but don't feel the need to take a picture of every second and then share those pictures with the world.

10) - Get connected and follow the #ntchat hashtag. There is whole world full of resources and information out there, so don't feel limited to just the colleagues in your hallway, in your school and in your district. Reach out and take control of your own learning and development.

What would you add to this list?


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just new teachers who benefit from building relationships with students, colleagues, and people outside their work.

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 27, 8:06 PM

Much of this is the same advice I had received many years ago preparing to become a new teacher (in an education program).

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Malcolm Gladwell Defends Disputed '10,000 Hours' Rule

Malcolm Gladwell Defends Disputed '10,000 Hours' Rule | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Academic fight! Malcolm Gladwell's popular "10,000-hours rule" was debunked in a Sports Illustrated writer's new book, so Gladwell defended his theory by accusing the author of creating a "straw man."

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good practice habits are important. Whether it is 10, 000 hours might be open to discussion, but event the most genetically endowed individuals practice what they do and that is what allows them to excel in their field. The key might be practicing what works. It clearly does not make sense to practice what does not work.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 24, 1:01 PM

from the article: "Gladwell defended his theory against Epstein's assertions in a piece in The New Yorker, arguing that Epstein did not actually debunk the 10,000-hour rule as he explained it. "Epstein has written a wonderful book. But I wonder if, in his zeal to stake out a provocative claim on this one matter, he has built himself a straw man." You see, Gladwell only applied the 10,000-hour rule to cognitively demanding activities that needed significant thought, unlike those runners and dart-throwers.

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Good Leaders Never Stop Learning

Good Leaders Never Stop Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

What makes a leader the most? To find out the answer, this Ivey professor interviewed more than 30 leaders around the world, capturing their observations on what it takes to make a truly connected and effective leader. Those observations, revealed in this article, confirm and validate what many of us hope that a good leader ought to be made of.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading is an ongoing project. It involves listening and working with people.

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 1, 4:41 PM

Good leaders never stop learning. They follow a challenging and never-ending path of learning, which requires keeping an open mind.

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The Myth of the Importance of Retaining Information

The Myth of the Importance of Retaining Information | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"No one cares about retaining information with the exception that we care about grades and test scores. We care about grades and test scores because we are forced into taking tests and working for grades by an education system that has abandoned the idea that we learn for any other reason. Let me make a radical suggestion: We learn so that we can do something we couldn’t do before. One of those things ought not be test taking, but in our world that seems to be the only one that matters. How sad. I will put this simply: there is no reason to retain information, (with the exception of things like remembering the directions on how to get someplace you are going.) In other words, short term memorization matters. Long term memorization is basically of no use (except for maybe multiplication tables.)  I have forgotten nearly anything that I learned in college. I don’t chastise myself for that, since anything I really needed to know I have used a zillion times since and anything else, well I didn’t need to know it." | by Roger Schank


Via Todd Reimer, Bill Ferguson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Even on tests, we memorize and discard. What has meaning is held by students at all ages.

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What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning?

What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Tom Hoerr leads the New City School, a private elementary school in St. Louis, Mo., that has been working on grit. ‘One of the sayings that you hear around here a great deal is, 'If our kids have graduated from here with nothing but success, then we have failed them, because they haven’t learned how to respond to frustration and failure,'‘ says Hoerr. After years of focusing on the theory known as ‘multiple intelligences’ and trying to teach kids in their own style, Hoerr says he’s now pulling kids out of their comfort zones intentionally. ‘The message is that life isn’t always easy,’ Hoerr says. His goal is to make sure ‘that no matter how talented [students are], they hit the wall, so they can learn to pick themselves up, hit the wall again and pick themselves up again, and ultimately persevere and succeed.’ But even putting the question of educational trends aside, the experience of principal Tom Hoerr as documented in the NPR segment brings up a question that parents and teachers wrestle with all the time: Should we be making learning easier for kids—or harder? The answer, according to research in cognitive science and psychology, is both." | by Annie Murphy Paul


Via Todd Reimer, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is interesting is that John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead's work indicates learning is always be on the edge of where we are comfortable reaching into zones of discomfort. Some might call it an ecotone where the ecosystem is very fluid. It is the way we support students in these spaces that is important. They can fail with support and build resiliency. This means teachers living in relationship with children rather than just facilitating and observing.

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Heinrich Erasmus's curator insight, March 27, 2:46 AM

This is a very interesting perspective on the current trend in the learning environment, whether it be primary, secondary or tertiary education. Like the article says towards the focus should remain on making education easy but harder. To clarify that statement, by making the education easier through proper education whether it be Multimedia or class room aspect. Another way to improve on making it easier is entertainment and group involvement just to name a few improvements. These variations in education style might be able to encourage more students to take on more difficult areas of study.

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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age. 

 

Educational theory and practice have begun to appear more frequently in the popular press. Terms such as collaborative learning, [http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/comm440-540/CL2pager.htm ] project-based learning, [ http://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning] metacognition, [ https://teal.ed.gov/tealGuide/metacognitive ] inquiry-based learning, [ http://www.inquirybasedlearning.org/?page=What_is_IBL ] and so on, might be new to some audiences, but they have a relatively long and well-documented history for many educators. The most widely-known and promising pedagogical approach is constructivism [http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/topics/cognition/construct.html ] grounded on the work of Piaget,  [ http://www.piaget.org/aboutPiaget.html ] Vygotsky, [http://www.simplypsychology.org/vygotsky.html ] and Bruner [http://infed.org/mobi/jerome-bruner-and-the-process-of-education/ ]. Given how it has transformed my own understanding of pedagogy, teaching, and learning, constructionism [ http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/topics/cognition/construct.html ] seems ripe for a similar resurgence — like a phoenix rising from the ashes of Taylorization and standardized testing.


Via Elizabeth E Charles, Anisa Dedej, giovanni nulli, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When students write for teachers they are writing up hill is an interesting way of understanding teaching and learning. I agree with the fundamental principal learning is for the student. It likely happens in the company of others, but it is personal and in that respect emancipating.

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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, March 6, 2:42 AM

From inside the article: "Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products."

Channylt's curator insight, April 3, 5:51 AM

A great article about Constructionism a hybrid pedagogy - a theory based upon collaborative, project-based and student ownership of learning resulting in a learning that is largely 'constructed' by the learner themselves. 

Paul Oliveri's curator insight, April 6, 1:23 AM

Constructionism, constructivism, learner centred, authentic, real world, active process, problem based, integration of technology in an authentic way and most importantly transformative.

 

With 63 scoopit interactions this article obviously resonates with the broader education community.

 

How do I use these principles to facilitate someone becoming a Paramedic via the distance mode of learning. I use technology to create learner centred, authentic and problem based activities to facilitate their learning.


This may be having the student develop a video of their interactions with simulated patients, participate in lecturer facilitated collaborative exercises (synchronous and asynchronous) or collaborating in groups with their peers in both synchronous and asynchronous activities.


All of the interactions were previously done in a live environment. Today technology is just the vessel for which these interactions occur.

 

Me I’m still just one of many resources available to them.

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The 4 C’s of Collaborative Learning Infographic

The 4 C’s of Collaborative Learning Infographic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The 4 C’s of Collaborative Learning Infographic shows how collaborative learning: Creation, Content, Connection, Community can help employees adopt new skills.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The idea of communities might be the most important one. We can build from where we are and connect outwards.

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, February 23, 4:43 PM

Love this infographic. Clear to the point. I think I might use it in the classroom to help the kids understand.

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10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching - A.J. Juliani

10 Commandments of Innovative Teaching - A.J. Juliani | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What is innovative teaching? The answer is always changing. Here's a list of ways we can innovate while technology, standards, and content all change.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When students enter the classroom, they bring their personal curricula in the form of their autobiographies. We can ignore that or we can let them reconstruct the formal curriculum around their lives.

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Juan Legarda's curator insight, February 12, 6:26 PM

Creative Teaching is about daily innovation.

Etd6's curator insight, February 17, 3:19 AM
Test
Vatormabalissa Ratajczyk's curator insight, May 20, 11:49 AM

Ensenar con technologia es dificil si no sepas usarlo. Profesors ayudaria estudiantes mas si ellos poden usar mas technologia. 

 

Ratajczyk, T

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How to personalize learning

How to personalize learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Those who have made the transition from teacher-led instruction to student-driven education say it is a difficult process.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not clear what is meant by help teachers adjust to change. Does this mean teachers are given autonomy to make changes they feel need to be made to help students? I don't see that happening. It would shake up the status quo and those outside the classroom would not want that.

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 11:47 AM

Technology is not enough, but technology is your friend. It can help, but ultimately, relationships or important. 

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What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning?

What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

'Learning thrives on error'

"Among all the influences that can make a profound difference in student learning is how we think about our role!  So, start with looking inward and ask about the mind frames you have as an educator. 

It is through these mind frames that we make decisions in the classroom and school, and it is argued that educators highly imbued with these mind frames are among the high impact educators."


Via Beth Dichter, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers need to recast themselves as learners alongside students. The days of the expert are behind us despite the advent of TED talks and other media where we still seem to think the sage on the stage is the way to impart knowledge, wisdom, and truth. There are moments for that, but learning is very relational, contingent, contextual, and personal.

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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, January 15, 2:30 PM

This is a great article and seems to be based on the same ideas that Carol Dwek's Mindset relies on. Worth a read. 

Armando's curator insight, January 19, 8:21 AM
What Are the 7 Mind Frames of Learning?
Terry Doherty's curator insight, January 27, 5:48 PM

I like the approach of "walking in their shoes" to describe how educators effect an interest in learning.

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Student Motivation: It’s More Complicated Than We Think

Student Motivation: It’s More Complicated Than We Think | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Motivation—there are two kinds: intrinsic, which involves doing something because we want to do it, and extrinsic, which is doing something because we have to do it. A negative relationship exists between the two.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Motivation is complex and very individual.

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 15, 12:24 PM

excerpt: "In his research he identified 16 distinct universal reinforcements that he developed into an assessment tool called the Reiss Motivation Profile. “Everybody is motivated by the 16 universal reinforcements, but not in the same way. Individuals show reliable individual differences in how they prioritize these 16 reinforcements.” (pp. 154-155) These 16 reinforcements are listed in the article and they include the following motivations (among others): eating, the desire for food; curiosity, the desire for understanding; independence, the desire for self-reliance; social contact, the desire for peer companionship; and vengeance, the desire to confront those who offend."

- See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/student-motivation-its-more-complicated-than-we-think/#!