Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Goodwill isn't just an asset, it's also a strategy 

Goodwill isn't just an asset, it's also a strategy  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Servant-leadership and the goodwill it engenders are hard work.
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 3, 9:44 AM
Approaching others with goodwill engenders empathy; you cut them slack, do your best to walk in their shoes, and view things from their perspective.
 
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Is Finland’s basic universal income a solution to automation, fewer jobs and lower wages?

Is Finland’s basic universal income a solution to automation, fewer jobs and lower wages? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Both left and right are promoting the idea of a basic wage for everyone, currently on trial, as a solution to the new world of work

Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is beginning to be talked about in Canada. It may be part of how, in an increasingly technological world, we are able to live. It is may also be part of the answer to people who live below the poverty line.
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, February 20, 12:39 PM

Yes, I'm a great supporter of the unconditional basicincome. This article give the pro's and cons. Well balanced view.
By Sonia Dodha.

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How do leaders lead during such uncertainty? 

How do leaders lead during such uncertainty?  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How has this period of uncertainty challenged or changed the way you lead your organization?
 

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Reaching out without kindness and generosity have ways of repaying the giver and the receiver.
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donhornsby's curator insight, February 14, 9:55 AM
“The lack of trust is (IMHO) the core driver of the uncertainty we are all feeling. Our challenge as leaders is to build trust with our employees, our customers and to make an impact on the broader business community across the globe.” -- Randy Wootton, CEO, Rocket Fuel
 
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13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential

13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership skills aren't stagnant. Different generations moving in and out of the workforce dictate changes to the way people lead.

Via David Hain, Ron McIntyre, Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Leadership is always changing and transforming.
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David Hain's curator insight, December 15, 2016 2:54 AM

Misleading headline, bathes trends have become more critical in recent times.

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Professional Development Isn’t Just for Teachers

Professional Development Isn’t Just for Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Administrators need to learn how to lead schools into the future by empowering everyone in the building.
Via Sandy Shoro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Professional learning, rather than development, is based on autonomy and responsible choice. The idea anyone empowers someone suggests an external process that frees us from chains.
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How to Redesign Your Life With Just 3 Questions

How to Redesign Your Life With Just 3 Questions | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This is your life. What do you want it to look like?

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These are three excellent questions when we go deep with them.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 27, 2016 9:33 AM
(From the article): At first, your actions will be small. Maybe you’ll send an email to a friend to find out what’s hurting them. Or maybe you’ll find some online training that will show you how to achieve more. But over time, this simple exercise will etch away the stone and reveal the singular roadmap for your success. 
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But What If My Team Doesn't Want to Change? 

But What If My Team Doesn't Want to Change?  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Change requires confidence and inclusion, not selling. When you can take your audacious vision and make it feel real, practical, and achievable, your team will sail along with you. 


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Change happens. It goes on all the time, often unnoticed. It takes leadership without micro-managing and coercing people to follow. Good listening and being present are keys.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 14, 2016 9:46 AM
(From the article): No one wants stuff done to them, or even for them. With them goes a lot further. Ask employees, “What’s working well and how do we leverage it? What enhancements do we need? Where should we head next?” All these questions go a long way. Include employees by involving them in your change efforts. 
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The Most Important Leadership Competencies, According to Leaders Around the World

The Most Important Leadership Competencies, According to Leaders Around the World | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
They’re all hard to improve because they run counter to our instincts.

Via Carlos Fosca, Bibiana Vargas
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

So we rather focus on teaching values as hardskill, not as soft skill.  After all, the question remains on what can you do and drive us there, rather on what do you know.


The number one quality is having high ethical standards and providing safety.

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Bibiana Vargas's curator insight, March 23, 2016 12:17 PM

So we rather focus on teaching values as hardskill, not as soft skill.  After all, the question remains on what can you do and drive us there, rather on what do you know. 

Ian Berry's curator insight, March 23, 2016 7:07 PM

I find "provides safety for Trial and error" the most interesting and top rating one the most intriguing considering the ongoing lack of accountability for the GFC and other corporate failings

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You’ve Got to Serve Someone

You’ve Got to Serve Someone | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Servant leadership is not a new concept. Robert Greenleaf introduced the idea back in 1977. In recent years, however, concrete evidence has emerged that the approach delivers more than warm, fuzzy feelings. Last month, the first quantitative study that begins to explain a connection between servant leadership and improved individual performance was published by researchers in Canada. This new evidence may help move servant leadership from a niche practice to one adopted by more executives.


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up. This is a concept that is long overdue. If we practiced the hard work of true servant-leadership in schools, what a difference that would make.
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:38 AM
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up.
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How Teams Can Transform Schools by Elena Aguilar

How Teams Can Transform Schools by Elena Aguilar | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Elena Aguilar

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Team and community are  not synonomous; however one can lead to the other. Community can be messy and chaotic which is why communication (which shares a common etymology with community) is essential. There is considerable risk of remaining a team without transforming. I coached hockey for years and players and coaches can get stuck in ruts.

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How to Promote Yourself W/out Sounding Like a Jerk

How to Promote Yourself W/out Sounding Like a Jerk | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Be humble, and be real.

Via Karen Dietz, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

It is always hard to find the balance between too modest and too full of one's self.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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David Hain's curator insight, May 23, 2015 5:39 AM

This is a key balance to pull off for successful influencing and building relationship capital!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 23, 2015 9:52 AM

Excellent insights for those, like me, that struggle with self promotion. Well worth the read.

ASVP's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:13 AM

Definitely worth reading

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How the Most Effective Leaders Turn Weaknesses Into Strengths

How the Most Effective Leaders Turn Weaknesses Into Strengths | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Face it, you can't be good at everything. Here's how to make up for the skills you lack.

 

1. Recognize and accept your weaknesses.

You can't turn a weakness into a strength if you're busy denying the weakness exists. So your first assignment is to recognize that you have weaknesses and determine what they are.


Via Mel Riddile, Strategic Leadership Group, Bobby Dillard, Gisele HELOU
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Good leaders bring their resiliency and share it with others. Managers hope that some technique will work.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Fostering Women Leaders: A fitness test for your top team

Fostering Women Leaders: A fitness test for your top team | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The challenges are well known: women in business continue to face a formidable gender gap for senior-leadership positions.1 Moreover, there are fewer and fewer women at each step along the path to the C-suite, although they represent a majority of entry-level employees at Fortune 500 companies and outnumber men in college-graduation rates.2 Increasingly, the barriers too are well known: a mix of cultural factors, ingrained mind-sets, and stubborn forms of behavior, including a tendency to tap a much narrower band of women leaders than is possible given the available talent pool.


Via The Learning Factor, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

If we believe that leading is everyone's work, this is not just a message for the top end. It should be throughout the organization.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Elizabeth Alfaro's curator insight, February 6, 2015 9:13 AM

Definitivamente se necesita más mujeres en el ámbito tecnológico, de paso que se simplifica el código ;) 

Maggie Lawlor's curator insight, February 7, 2015 4:56 PM

Balanced communities involve both genders, whether that's at work or outside.  We have created an unbalanced world in business and I wonder if this is reflected in the current instability?

Maria Rekrut's curator insight, February 8, 2015 9:34 PM

When you own your own business you don't have to wait for anyone to promote you.  You promote yourself.

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The Fundamental Differences Between Leadership and Management

The Fundamental Differences Between Leadership and Management | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Visionary leadership and great management achieves the best results. Seems obvious right? Then why do so many companies get it wrong, especially during times of needed change?

 

There are core fundamental differences between leadership and management that apply to any team or organization, but the focus of this article is to explore the strengths of each as they apply to leading organizational change.

 

Generally speaking, management is a set of systems and processes designed for organizing, budgeting, staffing and problem solving to achieve the desired results of an organization. Leadership defines the vision, mission and what the "win" looks like in the future. It inspires the team to embody the beliefs and behaviors necessary to take the actions needed to achieve those results.

 

The most successful transformations occur when strong visionary leadership converges with great management. Both are required to define a clear path, plan accordingly and see the mission plan through to fulfillment.


Via The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The first paragraph and its questions are essential. We confuse leadership and management. We put managers in roles and call them leaders.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 23, 5:15 PM

Visionary leadership and great management combined achieves winning results. Here's why.

Begoña Pabón's curator insight, March 22, 5:41 PM
Existen diferencias entre direccion y liderazgo...Cierto! Aunque nada es excluyente... lo idea: un fuerte liderazgo visionario con una gran direccion. ¿Posible?...Yo creo que si.
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The Difference Between Leaders & Managers

The Difference Between Leaders & Managers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What is the biggest difference between managers and leaders? This question has been asked many times before both roles are important but they seek to do different things...Leadership begins where management ends and smart organizations value both and great organizations work hard to make each a part of their team.

Via donhornsby, Heather Teegarden
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Management and leadership complement each other. Peter Drucker who wrote about management and Abraham Maslow used the words interchangeably. We lead people i.e. teachers lead students (pedagogy) and we manage things.
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donhornsby's curator insight, February 15, 10:20 AM
Leaders shape culture. Managers enact culture.
 
Ian Berry's curator insight, February 18, 1:50 AM
There's value in lists like this. I worry though that the perception is that leadership is somehow more desirable work than management. Leadership and management are two sides of the same coin - one is all about people and the other all about processes. We need both operating in harmony.
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Questions As The Ultimate Leadership Tool

Questions As The Ultimate Leadership Tool | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Another example of a leader who makes effective use of questions is Commander D. Michael Abrashoff. 

 

Via donhornsby, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The questions we ask as leaders and teqachers should not presume answers. Hans-Georg Gadamer wrote about eloquent questions without presumed answers. The questions structured the dialogue.
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donhornsby's curator insight, February 8, 9:51 AM
When are you going to ask yourself some of these powerful questions?
 
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The Cost of Distrust

The Cost of Distrust | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Distrust commands a very handsome price. It destroys initiative, damages relationships, creates a toxic environment and reduces competitiveness.

Via donhornsby, Pavel Barta
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Trust is earned. Parker Palmer said authority (trust) is authored in the words and actions of a person. My experience is there is not much trust in schools.
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donhornsby's curator insight, December 2, 2016 11:10 AM
What if I told you that mistrust could kill our individual aspirations, cripple our personal and business relationships, strip the muscle from our most powerful leaders, and crush the productivity and morale of our best and brightest people? Would I have your attention? Then why don’t we give trust the attention it deserves?
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine, PhD from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization 

Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What Really Lies Behind the Procrastination?

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a need to be attentive and present to the task at hand. In a world filled with distractions, it is easy to become sidetracked.
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 12, 2016 9:46 AM
(From the article): So, how do you slay the procrastination demon in your organization? As a leader, you must help people overcome any fear that may be preventing them from taking action. Teach them to block tasks together, scheduling small chunks of time where they allow for brief periods of distraction before getting back on task without interruption. Clearly communicate direction to your employees, work together to develop a plan that is broken down into milestones, and then hold people accountable for sticking to the plan. Don’t allow important tasks to get buried underneath layers of busy work. Help employees to recognize when procrastination has become a habit. Set clear objectives and timelines to keep employees on task and on target. Educate employees and managers about the symptoms, causes, and consequences of persistent procrastination. Has it become a habit? Get started today and slay the demon.
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Are you a leader (in name only)? Counterfeit Leadership

Are you a leader (in name only)? Counterfeit Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This article showcases five traits of an outstanding leader. Is also exposes counterfeit leadership … A leader in name only.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we focus on accountability, leadership is no longer leadership. Leadership is about accepting responsibility. Yes, there are external structures that hold us to account, but how we repond (same root as reponsible) is how we experience being a leader. The other thing we do is conflate leadership and management. They are different and play partcular roles in  leading.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 18, 2016 8:55 AM
(From the article): Real leadership also means making hard choices, overcoming difficult challenges, and encouraging constituents to embrace change. Real leaders are not afraid to take a firm stance and accept responsibility for their decisions. In so doing, decisions are never made to win a popularity contest or to placate everyone by being all things to all people. Precious resources are allocated in areas where they provide the greatest good while carefully balancing short-term performance with long-term success. And, while you may not always agree with a real leader’s decision, you’ll always know that every decision was made in an honest, fair, and objective fashion. You’ll never have to second-guess a real leader’s intent; you’ll know what he or she stands for.
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8 questions for improving your leadership 

8 questions for improving your leadership  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here are some questions to help you evaluate whether your leadership contributes to a culture of encouragement.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is definitely necessary to improve functionality of community and organization as opposed to dysfunction.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 7, 2016 10:22 AM
Do you express a positive attitude toward the objective or goal to be accomplished? 

(From the article): Sometimes the only time that a person may hear from their manager is when they haven’t performed as expected. This leaves people thinking that the only time anyone cares what they do is when they make a mistake. Rather than allowing people to constantly guess whether or not they are performing as expected, you should take every opportunity to express heartfelt appreciation for the efforts of others whether the task be small or large. You also want to encourage others to express appreciation to members of the team. Cultivating a culture of appreciation will increase both morale and productivity.
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The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note

The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Super salespeople excel at writing thank you notes. That’s why they stay at the top of their game and drive BMWs.

But those who don’t live by commissions — or don’t earn the commissions or salary they want — could learn a thing or two about the impact of the tools used by those with star power.

Especially when such tools cost no more than the price of a stamp or take no more effort than clicking a button!


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:48 AM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 17, 2016 7:16 AM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
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The Power Of Thank You

The Power Of Thank You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The two most important words that inspire action are thank you.   


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I found thank you along with greeting students and parents and acknowledging my errors were important in my pedagogic relationships.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 23, 2016 10:12 AM

(From the article): So say thank you every day – Not just to your unsung heroes who help you, but also to your peers, supervisors, customers, friends and children. Don’t take them for granted. Write a personal note. Take them to lunch. Send them a small gift. Acknowledge the good things that they do and the difference they make.

 

Most of all – do it sincerely. You’ll be impressed with the actions that follow.

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The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work

The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

When we try to do things in a rush, we are usually destined to fail from the start — something I learned from my own mistakes. Faster doesn’t necessarily mean better.


Via David Hain, Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

Patience allows us to pause and listen closely to others, the world, and ourselves.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 1, 2016 6:26 AM

“The strongest of all warriors are these two — Time and Patience" ~ Tolstoy, HT @faisal_hoque

donhornsby's curator insight, February 11, 2016 9:54 AM

(From the article): Being a patient listener allows us to absorb the full message, both spoken and unspoken. Being patiently mindful of the speaker’s every gesture, facial expression, and change in tone allows for a fuller understanding of the underlying issues.

TIME ALLOWS FOR SMARTER DECISIONS.

The best ideas seldom come to mind immediately. The longer we take to ponder a problem, the easier our brains may find it to fit everything into place. It is often in the quiet moments when inspiration strikes, and it hardly ever happens when we are desperate to make a decision. An attitude of patience helps us to smooth over those inevitable bumps in the road, and we usually reach the best path in our own time.

 

Any decision can be made quickly, but the consequences of those choices live for much longer. We live in a world where split-second decisions and decisive actions are constantly encouraged at our workplaces. How much smoother would things be if we all took the time to make the right decision the first time? It is all too easy to be hijacked by pressures and emotions and rushed into a hasty mistake.

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A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next?

A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The article has a servant-leadership flavour to it. The challenge is to get past rhetoric to substantive action.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:22 PM


Our world is suffering greatly at the hands of people who have placed their desire to be right above the desire to achieve the right outcome. They confuse their need for an ego boost, their quest for power, and their thirst for greed with leadership. Many of the symptoms of poor leadership we’re seeing today may seemingly resolve themselves in the near term, but the greater problem won’t go away on its own.

Shakira A. Ali's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:45 PM

Frankly, I think we're looking for leadership in all the wrong places. I saw an interesting comment by Neil DeGrasse, astronomer and scientist. He observed that more than half of congressional seats are filled by lawyers - people who rely on the SKILL of arguing a point as a means of WINNING a point. This has nothing to do with whether the points made are true, moral, ethical or move society forward in any way.  Maybe we should be looking among the "masses" - those people who are living and working everyday to make life better "on the ground," so to speak. Entrepreneurs. Community organizers and activitists. Those who sit-in and protest and work in food kitchens and community gardens. These are the people who are coming up with solutions on a daily basis, and are unconcerned with, "scoring points."

Martha Bowring's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:01 PM

use in class

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A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader

A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I agree. What is most disconcerting is that the bosses I worked for the last 8-10 years I was teaching were that, bosses and not leaders.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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