Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Are you a leader (in name only)? Counterfeit Leadership

Are you a leader (in name only)? Counterfeit Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This article showcases five traits of an outstanding leader. Is also exposes counterfeit leadership … A leader in name only.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
When we focus on accountability, leadership is no longer leadership. Leadership is about accepting responsibility. Yes, there are external structures that hold us to account, but how we repond (same root as reponsible) is how we experience being a leader. The other thing we do is conflate leadership and management. They are different and play partcular roles in  leading.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 18, 8:55 AM
(From the article): Real leadership also means making hard choices, overcoming difficult challenges, and encouraging constituents to embrace change. Real leaders are not afraid to take a firm stance and accept responsibility for their decisions. In so doing, decisions are never made to win a popularity contest or to placate everyone by being all things to all people. Precious resources are allocated in areas where they provide the greatest good while carefully balancing short-term performance with long-term success. And, while you may not always agree with a real leader’s decision, you’ll always know that every decision was made in an honest, fair, and objective fashion. You’ll never have to second-guess a real leader’s intent; you’ll know what he or she stands for.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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The Power Of Thank You

The Power Of Thank You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The two most important words that inspire action are thank you.   


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found thank you along with greeting students and parents and acknowledging my errors were important in my pedagogic relationships.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 23, 10:12 AM

(From the article): So say thank you every day – Not just to your unsung heroes who help you, but also to your peers, supervisors, customers, friends and children. Don’t take them for granted. Write a personal note. Take them to lunch. Send them a small gift. Acknowledge the good things that they do and the difference they make.

 

Most of all – do it sincerely. You’ll be impressed with the actions that follow.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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8 questions for improving your leadership 

8 questions for improving your leadership  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here are some questions to help you evaluate whether your leadership contributes to a culture of encouragement.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is definitely necessary to improve functionality of community and organization as opposed to dysfunction.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 7, 10:22 AM
Do you express a positive attitude toward the objective or goal to be accomplished? 

(From the article): Sometimes the only time that a person may hear from their manager is when they haven’t performed as expected. This leaves people thinking that the only time anyone cares what they do is when they make a mistake. Rather than allowing people to constantly guess whether or not they are performing as expected, you should take every opportunity to express heartfelt appreciation for the efforts of others whether the task be small or large. You also want to encourage others to express appreciation to members of the team. Cultivating a culture of appreciation will increase both morale and productivity.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Supports for Leadership
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Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?

 

It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 2014 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.