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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Some people see me as Muslim first and a doctor second. That's how prejudice works | Haider Javed Warraich

Some people see me as Muslim first and a doctor second. That's how prejudice works | Haider Javed Warraich | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I am Pakistani and about to move to Chapel Hill. I never thought I’d have to pick a house based on where I might not get shot

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article is important for teachers to read and think about. What are our first reactions towards those that are different from us? What does that signal to students?

 

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We can no longer assume that a story is true because it appears in the paper

We can no longer assume that a story is true because it appears in the paper | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
John Quiggin: We are now in an age of transition. 20th century assumptions about mass media, and particularly the Press are breaking down, but nothing has emerged to replace them

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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We should never have and this is now the case for all news media sources. Kierkegaard suggested media distorted the story and it did not serve the public sphere well. It was controlled by the few and the many did not think about what was reported.

 

School is like that unless we have teachers who genuinely act as critical theorists opening up space for students to explore.

 

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Why I became a teacher: to help children from minority backgrounds

Why I became a teacher: to help children from minority backgrounds | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I understand what it's like to be a minority ethnic student in a white-dominated school – and I feel their struggle acutely, says teacher Aveninder Kaur

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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We want to make a difference, student by student.

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University of Saskatchewan president Ilene Busch-Vishniac fired

University of Saskatchewan president Ilene Busch-Vishniac fired | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
After more than a week of controversy over the firing and rehiring of an outspoken University of Saskatchewan professor, along with protests over the ongoing TransformUS program, U of S president Ilene Busch-Vishniac has been fired.

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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This makes it sound like only two people were responsible for the problems, but it is doubtful that the board did not know what was happening all along. Someone had to take the fall and rather than admitting mistakes were made that is what was done. It is the way things are done in bureaucracies and their non-transparency.

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Student Evaluations’ ‘Air of Objectivity’ Provide Institutions with the Comfort of Meaningless Numbers

Student Evaluations’ ‘Air of Objectivity’ Provide Institutions with the Comfort of Meaningless Numbers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The evaluations persist, a new paper argues, because they are easy to produce and offer the comfort of a number, but they make no sense statistically.

 

Summary by Academica Top Ten 22 September 2014

Scholars say teaching evaluations mistake "consumer satisfaction" for "product quality"
A new article by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley argues thatteaching evaluations offer little value as measures of teaching quality. Philip B Stark and Richard Freishstat say that traditional, Likert scale-based evaluations offer “an air of objectivity simply because they are numerical,” but too strongly reflect snap judgments and pre-existing biases. Averaging results, they say, is not appropriate in teaching evaluations. Rather, they suggest reporting score distributions and response rates. They also say that evaluations should not ask questions that are too broad or for which students lack the information to respond, such as whether the course was valuable. Stark and Freishstat say it would be more valuable to ask about students’ experiences and enjoyment. The authors propose an alternate system that focuses less on averaged evaluation scores and more on faculty members’ teaching portfolios, syllabi, student comments, and peer evaluation. “If we want to understand what’s going on in the classroom, we actually have to look at it. You can’t subcontract the evaluation of teaching to students,” said Stark. The Chronicle of Higher Education | Full Article


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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is interesting is that students in junior high understand that numbers and averages do not mean much unless context is understood. Likert-like scales are ranges and often we do not answer them honestly.

 

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Canada's jobless youth: Think-tank pushes plan to create 186,000 'guaranteed' positions

Canada's jobless youth: Think-tank pushes plan to create 186,000 'guaranteed' positions | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With youth unemployment well above the national average, exams might not be the only thing keeping young Canadians up at night. But one think-tank wants to ease the extracurricular stress students face by trying to guarantee availability of 186,000 jobs for those making the transition from backpack to briefcase.

 

Summary from Academica Top 10 25 June 2014

Canadian think-tank proposes “youth job guarantee”

Canadian think-tank the Broadbent Institute has a plan to create 186,000 “guaranteed” employment positions for Canada’s unemployed youth. The institute recently released a report that details this plan, essentially requiring investments by government and private businesses that will create 12-week-long, paid co-op, internship, and job placement positions in order to give young Canadians a boost into employment. “It’s time for the federal government and Canadian businesses to get serious about the youth jobs crisis and work together to tackle it,” said Rick Smith, Executive Director of the Broadbent Institute. “The employment situation of young people is worse today than before the recession, and that’s simply unacceptable.” At a pay rate of $15/hour, the institute asserts it is possible to decrease the number of unemployed youth by almost 50,000 at any given time. Smith says the private sector can use so-called “dead money”—money that is neither being invested or spent—to create jobs specifically for young workers, with the added bonus of growing the future labour force. CTV | Report


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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A job crisis for young people suggests that this is not good moving forward.

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University of Alberta president defends Ilene Busch-Vishniac

University of Alberta president defends Ilene Busch-Vishniac | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The president of the University of Alberta says the University of Saskatchewan's Board of Governors acted too hastily when it fired former president Ilene Busch-Vishniac.

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Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It appears the TransformUS program was and remains more important than people. Something that is important to take note of is this is the way many large educational systems work. Even when we disagree and are justified in our disagreement, we are told to be quiet. Dr. Buckingham stood up against something he disagreed with and paid a price. Freedom of speech and academic freedom are inextricably linked despite what some may think and say. Freedom of speech, within reasonable ethical bounds, is vital in a democratic society. If it is punished, we do not live in a democracy or anything close to it.

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iPamba's curator insight, May 30, 2014 9:58 AM

Had Prof Buckingham not spoken out, he would have remained fired, and it would continue to be business as usual.