Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Education Readings May 13th

Education Readings May 13th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz The scientific case for doodling while taking notes As I noted last week, Tony Buzan will be saying ‘I told you.’ “Using simple words and pictures helps us to see connections between pieces of information,…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The interview with Pasi Salhberg is interesting. The question that leads to him expanding on Big Data in schooling is worth reading and let soak in. It is about standardizing what teachers do and bypassing details that tell us about who we educate and the relationships teaching is founded on.
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leading and learning: Education Readings; the future of education: /being/creative/smart technology/revolution from the ground up/ here's to the crazy ones

leading and learning: Education Readings; the future of education: /being/creative/smart technology/revolution from the ground up/ here's to the crazy ones | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Here are some links to articles. There are two about the overselling of digital technology. We have known since the early part of the Century that adding digital technology does not alwsays improve teaching and learning.
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Stop Innovating in Schools. Please.

Stop Innovating in Schools. Please. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Too often when we talk about “innovation” in education, we point to that new set of Chromebooks or those shiny new Smartboards as examples of our efforts to change what we do in the classroom. That is, after all, what “innovation” is all about, to “make changes in something established, especially by introducing new methods, ideas, or products.” Over the last few years, many schools in the developed world have done a pretty good job on the new products front, earning billions of dollars for vendors who sell their gadgets or code under the guise of “innovation” of some degree or another. We’ve definitely got more stuff. And it’s arguable that our methods are changing, even if just a bit; the Maker Movement in schools, when fully embraced, is one such example of shifting roles in the classroom.

But on balance, is all of this “innovation” really changing us?

Not so much. Our efforts at innovating, regardless of method, idea, or product, have been focused far too much on incrementally improving the centuries old structures and practices we employ in schools, not on fundamentally rethinking them. And the vast majority of “innovation” I’ve seen in my visits to schools around the world doesn’t amount to much change at all in the area where we need it most: using those new methods, ideas, or products to shift agency for learning to the learner. To put it simply, innovation in schools today is far too focused on improving teaching, not amplifying learning.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I would take Will Richardson's key highlight and put teacher in place of where the word student appears. It does not mean that students are not important, they are, but teachers are often forgotten in this conversation.
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12 mindsets for creating innovative classrooms

12 mindsets for creating innovative classrooms | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Our mindsets can affect the experiences our students have in our classes and how they feel about our subject and us as teachers. Effective ones can have great impact.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Kelly Christopherson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think at the heart of the article there is the message that echoes Einstein's definition of insanity: solving problems with the same thinking that resulted in those problems. That is what we do in School.

 

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Education Readings April 15th

Education Readings April 15th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Why Kids Should Use Their Fingers in Math Class I well remember being admonished by an inspector for allowing my pupils to use their fingers! Guess she was wrong, as she was about a number…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The link that caught my attention is the one about ICT and whether it assists learning. My initial interviews suggest time to learn the proper use of a tool is important and finding practical ways to use tools is critical. Teachers seem to want to integrate it thoughtfully.
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Prabha Dixit's curator insight, April 16, 1:48 AM
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Education Readings March 18th

Education Readings March 18th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz This Is the Future of Education Heather McQuillan, who provided this, commented that she saw this video by John Spencer, and it really resonated. She advises that John has a great website at  http://www.spencerideas.org/ and he's…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is an emphasis on creativity in these readings. How we use technology (tools) is part of pedagogic creativity. Technology is about having conversations with and through our tools.
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High school students know that their learning isn't relevant | Education Recoded | Big Think

High school students know that their learning isn't relevant | Education Recoded | Big Think | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It is hard to make an argument that there are many desirable post-secondary educational or career scenarios for current high school students that will not require the use of computer technology on a daily basis. The kids have known this for quite some time now.


Via Beth Dichter, De'armond Mitchell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Several years ago, I was being professionally developed in critical thinking. It was not a session I wanted to attend, but took materials with me I used on a regular basis and simply re-designed an activity I already used. In my instructions, I commented I sent a letter/email to parents outlining a role they could play in the project as a consultant.

 

One of the facilitators, a teacher, questioned the use of parents. I smiled and replied, "When my wife goes to work, she does not close the door to her office and sequester herself. She works with others who bring particular and necessary skills." It is why I find John Dewey's writing so informative for teaching. It is hard, but rewarding teaching.

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Next Gen Learning Boosts Rigor, Relevance & Relationships

Next Gen Learning Boosts Rigor, Relevance & Relationships | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Don't miss this post! Tom Vander Ark explains how innovations in learning are supporting great learning environments for students &teachers.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think vigour is a better word than rigor which comes with mortis and makes the term rigor mortis. Also, it is like we are just discovering vigour, relevancy, and relationships are important. Dewey wrote about them long ago.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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