Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization 

Slaying the Procrastination Demon in Your Organization  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What Really Lies Behind the Procrastination?

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is a need to be attentive and present to the task at hand. In a world filled with distractions, it is easy to become sidetracked.
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 12, 2016 9:46 AM
(From the article): So, how do you slay the procrastination demon in your organization? As a leader, you must help people overcome any fear that may be preventing them from taking action. Teach them to block tasks together, scheduling small chunks of time where they allow for brief periods of distraction before getting back on task without interruption. Clearly communicate direction to your employees, work together to develop a plan that is broken down into milestones, and then hold people accountable for sticking to the plan. Don’t allow important tasks to get buried underneath layers of busy work. Help employees to recognize when procrastination has become a habit. Set clear objectives and timelines to keep employees on task and on target. Educate employees and managers about the symptoms, causes, and consequences of persistent procrastination. Has it become a habit? Get started today and slay the demon.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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You’ve Got to Serve Someone

You’ve Got to Serve Someone | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Servant leadership is not a new concept. Robert Greenleaf introduced the idea back in 1977. In recent years, however, concrete evidence has emerged that the approach delivers more than warm, fuzzy feelings. Last month, the first quantitative study that begins to explain a connection between servant leadership and improved individual performance was published by researchers in Canada. This new evidence may help move servant leadership from a niche practice to one adopted by more executives.


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up. This is a concept that is long overdue. If we practiced the hard work of true servant-leadership in schools, what a difference that would make.
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:38 AM
(From the article): Historically, servant leadership has been seen as more about the heart than the head. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that it is time for the head to catch up.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work

The habit that will consistently make you more powerful at work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

When we try to do things in a rush, we are usually destined to fail from the start — something I learned from my own mistakes. Faster doesn’t necessarily mean better.


Via David Hain, Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Patience allows us to pause and listen closely to others, the world, and ourselves.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 1, 2016 6:26 AM

“The strongest of all warriors are these two — Time and Patience" ~ Tolstoy, HT @faisal_hoque

donhornsby's curator insight, February 11, 2016 9:54 AM

(From the article): Being a patient listener allows us to absorb the full message, both spoken and unspoken. Being patiently mindful of the speaker’s every gesture, facial expression, and change in tone allows for a fuller understanding of the underlying issues.

TIME ALLOWS FOR SMARTER DECISIONS.

The best ideas seldom come to mind immediately. The longer we take to ponder a problem, the easier our brains may find it to fit everything into place. It is often in the quiet moments when inspiration strikes, and it hardly ever happens when we are desperate to make a decision. An attitude of patience helps us to smooth over those inevitable bumps in the road, and we usually reach the best path in our own time.

 

Any decision can be made quickly, but the consequences of those choices live for much longer. We live in a world where split-second decisions and decisive actions are constantly encouraged at our workplaces. How much smoother would things be if we all took the time to make the right decision the first time? It is all too easy to be hijacked by pressures and emotions and rushed into a hasty mistake.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Business Tips
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Only 12.3% of workforce possesses attributes of worker passion.

Only 12.3% of workforce possesses attributes of worker passion. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By cultivating the traits of worker passion in their workforce, organizations can make sustained performance gains and develop the resilience they need to…

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder what is at the root of this trend? Is it that we are doing someone else's work? When we are engaged in work we find meaningful and that makes a difference, perhaps that would make a difference. It is interesting how making a difference makes a difference.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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BSN's curator insight, October 9, 2014 7:54 AM

Only 12.3% of workforce possesses attributes of worker passion.

#businesstips #management

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Unplug
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The Negativity Epidemic

The Negativity Epidemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Unfortunately, negativity can become an insidious habit within organisations. If such behaviour falls short of misconduct or appears to have an effect

Via Susan Taylor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Once embedded, negativity is hard to extricate. I found the best thing for me was to leave. Being in a healthy place is important to positivity.
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Susan Taylor's curator insight, January 13, 2014 8:13 AM

Negativity is becoming an epidemic in organizations, preventing them from achieving excellence and exceeding goals. 

 

If you want to tackle negativity in your firm or life, here are some tips from The e.Mile:

 

  • Pay attention to negativity with a view of moving towards positivity
  • Try not to take complaints personally
  • Reacting to negativity with negativity perpetuates negativity
  • Teach people to communicate in empowering ways
  • Challenge the negative views of your complainers
  • Reward positive behavior
  • Celebrate success regularly
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note

The Big Impact of a Small and Thoughtful Thank You Note | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Super salespeople excel at writing thank you notes. That’s why they stay at the top of their game and drive BMWs.

But those who don’t live by commissions — or don’t earn the commissions or salary they want — could learn a thing or two about the impact of the tools used by those with star power.

Especially when such tools cost no more than the price of a stamp or take no more effort than clicking a button!


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2016 8:48 AM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 17, 2016 7:16 AM
(From the article): Consider your own social media activity: Would you rather see a “like” or a “comment” on your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn post? Of course, you’re not mailing a formal sealed and delivered handwritten note, but certainly a comment shows more appreciation for a thoughtful post that you’ve benefitted from than clicking a “Like” button. Saying “thank you” never goes out of style. It benefits both parties. And it’s contagious. Taking time to thank others sends a message that you care about what they do and who they are.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Surviving Leadership Chaos
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The Power Of Thank You

The Power Of Thank You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The two most important words that inspire action are thank you.   


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found thank you along with greeting students and parents and acknowledging my errors were important in my pedagogic relationships.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 23, 2016 10:12 AM

(From the article): So say thank you every day – Not just to your unsung heroes who help you, but also to your peers, supervisors, customers, friends and children. Don’t take them for granted. Write a personal note. Take them to lunch. Send them a small gift. Acknowledge the good things that they do and the difference they make.

 

Most of all – do it sincerely. You’ll be impressed with the actions that follow.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Business Tips
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Introverts in the Workplace: Why they shouldn't be Underestimated

Introverts in the Workplace: Why they shouldn't be Underestimated | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Introverts have been having a bit of a moment in the spotlight lately. (Ironic, since that’s the place they’re least likely to enjoy themselves.) A few dozen Buzzfeed quizzes, a New York Times be…

Via TechinBiz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I struggled with my introversion for most of my adult life. I had a few advocates i.e. my spouse who helped me immensely. More recently, several colleagues recognized the strengths I presented and asked for me to use them. One thing about my introversion was, as a teacher, I had empathy for introverted students.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Unplug
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The High Cost of Multitasking | infographic

The High Cost of Multitasking | infographic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Multitasking is a fact of our modern, connected life. However, research shows it makes us less effective, increases mistakes and stress, and costs the

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Multi-tasking takes away from creativity and effectiveness. In a classroom, it takes away from learning. The problem is we have adults in schools who are serial multi-taskers and who influence children with that behaviour. Now, some of it is a product of the work we do, but some of it is denial.

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craig daniels's curator insight, January 23, 2014 1:17 PM

After dozens of well respected studies showing that mulitasking leads to getting less quality work down people still swear they are the exception to the rule. Go figure...

PracSimplicityGroup's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:54 PM

Funny how the downsides now seem obvious!

Sabrina Li's curator insight, November 4, 2014 12:47 AM

A really nice infographic talking about multitasking in the workplace. It summarizes data including task-switching, multitasking effects on errors/speed, etc. while also boasting some affordances of using video web conferencing.