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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’

Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Do we really move from School world to the Real world? Or are they both part of each other? Dewey wrote about this a Century ago.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 30, 11:16 AM

Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.


kelvinsmim's curator insight, October 30, 11:25 AM
The dynamo and alternator are two very similar devices that have the same function; to produce electric power via a mechanical input. Both dynamos and alternators use the same concept of electromagnetic fields to produce power. The main difference between dynamos and alternator is the type of current they produce. Dynamos produce a direct current that flows in the same direction.For more information visit our website.
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Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education

Howard Gardner, creator of ‘multiple intelligences’ theory, launches new project on ‘good’ education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Armed with a set of criteria drawn from different disciplines, I identified seven separate intelligences. All human beings possess these seven intelligences, but we differ from one another in which are strong; and in any case, strength or weakness in one (say spatial intelligence) does not predict strength or weakness in another (say, interpersonal or musical intelligence).

 

I would now add a few more intelligences to the list, and others, most famously Daniel Goleman, have proposed yet other intelligences like emotional intelligence. I am no longer invested in my particular set of intelligences. For me, the important advance is that a multiplicity of intelligences has been acknowledged—wits, rather than wit.

 

In this era of succinct messaging, I’ve created a twitter-short formula: Multiple Wits and Good Grits Lead to a Success Beyond Selfies.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Howard-GARDNER

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to include as many people in this projects as possible. The object should be good education, whatever good means, for as many as possible.

 

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Antonio Gerardo Gutiérrez Sánchez's curator insight, October 4, 10:31 PM

agregar su visión ...

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 5, 10:07 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Laura Saavedra's curator insight, October 8, 5:26 PM

So what is your mind like?

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The Educator with a Growth Mindset

Presentation materials for an educator inservice on growth mindsets. Includes background information, historical perspectives, a self-assessment, and strategi…

 

Learn more:

 


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=MindShift...

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This a rather long show, but has some useful points.

 

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Margarita Parra's curator insight, October 3, 10:03 AM

Abrirse a las ideas, explorar alternativas, aprender de otros, utilizar eficientemente los recursos tecnológicos, colaborar, compartir,...

Chris Carter's curator insight, October 3, 8:48 PM

Ready-to-go presentation

Tony Meehan's curator insight, October 4, 5:49 AM

All you need to introduce a growth mindset culture, anywhere, comprehensively and generously compiled by @JackieGerstein Ed.D.

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The Shift of the Role of the Teacher

The Shift of the Role of the Teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

We know today’s students will have to create their jobs, not look for jobs. They will compete with others around the globe. They will have jobs replaced by outsourcing and technology if their skills are easily replicated or duplicated.  To succeed, students will need creativity, communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and entrepreneurship.

 

They will need to be able to adapt to change, be resilient and able to work effectively in a variety of environments.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Kevin Kaatz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching will be an amalgam of a number of roles perhaps unfolding in very unexpected ways. Is it possible that during the course of the day teaching can be each of the roles listed in the graphic?

 

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 28, 8:54 AM

From the plain lecturing to the complex Coaching skills

In which step do you think are your teaching scenario?

nihal abitiu's curator insight, September 29, 4:32 AM

The  role of the Teacher

Pamela Perry King's curator insight, September 29, 11:14 AM

What's the change: Excellent Tips!

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Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool

Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It's important to recognize that a growth mindset is an overall paradigm for personal development rather than a pedagogical tool for measuring academic accomplishment.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=mindset

 


Via Gust MEES, Yashy Tohsaku, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Growth mindset should be a philosophy in teaching and learning. Does it replace pedagogy? I don't think so, but I think they work together. Max van Manen's work in the area of thoughtful pedagogy fits well with growth mindset.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 19, 5:24 PM
It's important to recognize that a growth mindset is an overall paradigm for personal development rather than a pedagogical tool for measuring academic accomplishment.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=mindset


Tony Meehan's curator insight, September 20, 4:57 PM

Working with learners of low SES and whose environment more often than not ensures they have a fixed mindset, it is important that we help them to redefine what success is. Too often it is fixed around being rich, having a big car, house, jewellery etc. These learners then become preoccupied with looking for the short-cut to success, to the riches they believe will make them happy. It doesn't work out like that of course. How then to help the alter their thinking? 


Dweck's work is essential in this. But as this article states it cannot be seen as "a task to complete".  It requires a shift in thinking of all in an organisation, a movement for a whole-school way of thinking, involving also parents or carers.  This article by Costa, Garmston and Zimmerman provides a solid basis for promoting growth mindsets in educators. 

Anna-Liisa Hayward's curator insight, September 25, 3:08 AM

This article is not specifically related to ICT but it makes some points that all teachers need to consider: how to deal with change, how to grow as a professional, how to collaborate. 

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Educating Parents About Education

Educating Parents About Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many parents today have an educational perspective based on 20th century pedagogy and methodology. Teachers need to educate them about where education is now.

Via Gust MEES, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The second paragraph begins with the line "things have changed." In response, I would say the more things change the more the stay the same. The important point in the article is engaging teachers in a conversation and asking them to be part of the solutions not for now, but for the future. We have too many experts stating imperatives rather than engaging in conversations, asking questions, and listening.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 17, 6:58 PM

Many parents today have an educational perspective based on 20th century pedagogy and methodology. Teachers need to educate them about where education is now.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Parents




Lori DiMarco's curator insight, September 17, 10:52 PM

Our goal (TCDSB) this year is to have parent focus groups to determine what parents need to understand the 21st Century Learner - and then we will begin working with parent groups to address these needs

Vivian Kohler Fenandez's curator insight, September 21, 2:07 PM

A must

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Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding

Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Through alternative formative assessment, teachers can check for student understanding without falling back on the tedious or intimidating pop quiz.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When I completed my Master's in Education, I used something similar to the 60 second paper and had students reflect on what was important to them in their learning. The most insightful times were when someone said the learning was of little value. That caused me to question what I was doing and rethink the way I taught. Sometimes it worked and other times it did not.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 6, 10:32 AM

Through alternative formative assessment, teachers can check for student understanding without falling back on the tedious or intimidating pop quiz.


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4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do

4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Transformational teachers create experiences in their classrooms, melding the art and science of any subject and making their students care about learning.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I prefer the gerund transforming. It suggests an ongoing process rather than an end which nouns suggest. The rest makes sense.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 4, 4:24 PM

Transformational teachers create experiences in their classrooms, melding the art and science of any subject and making their students care about learning.


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Coaching v mentoring: what works best for teachers?

Coaching v mentoring: what works best for teachers? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teacher Andrew Jones explains the difference between coaching and mentoring, and how they suit different professional development needs

 

Coaching, on the other hand, consists of peer-to-peer discussions that provide the person being coached with objective feedback on their strengths and weaknesses in areas chosen by them. While discussion is led by the coach, they ask questions that allow the professional seeking advice to reflect on their practice and set their own goals for improvement. This is the opposite of mentoring as the coach does not evaluate, judge or set targets, and the person being coached is in full control of the discussion.

 

Unlike mentoring, coaching also gives the recipient more say on the direction of their professional development and encourages them to take more ownership of their CPD.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Is it one or the other? Or is it some of both?

 

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june holley's curator insight, August 12, 7:47 AM

This is a distinction that is important for developing network leaders.

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 13, 10:46 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Sandrine Delage (Borgé)'s curator insight, August 14, 3:06 AM

Les termes de coaching et mentoring sont souvent utilisés et je n'avais pas vraiment réfléchi à la différence des deux approches. Si elles se basent toutes deux sur des échanges informels, elles ont un périmètre et des objectifs différents très bien expliqués dans l'article.

 

Cela va m'aider dans le mentoring que j'effectue autour du digital, activité que j'ai acceptée sant trop connaître les principes.

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Pride of Profession: Striving to Become a Great Teacher | Part two

Pride of Profession: Striving to Become a Great Teacher | Part two | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How can we expect students to aspire to be great if we are not also aspiring for greatness?

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Great+Teachers

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Silverback Learning
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I did not want to be a great teacher. I wanted to be a teacher.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 30, 8:55 AM

Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Great+Teachers


Silverback Learning's curator insight, July 30, 12:19 PM

There are so many resources available to educators today. Great teachers are great learners too.

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Musings of a (New) Education Insurgent | I hereby declare myself an education rebel

Musings of a (New) Education Insurgent | I hereby declare myself an education rebel | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
SHIFT PARADIGM | by Mark E. Weston The system of schooling to which I have dedicated my life seems incapable of educating all students to high levels of learning


Taking those lessons to heart, I hereby declare myself an education rebel who will no longer work to save the educational system for which I’ve long toiled.


Further, I vow to work to create, nurture, and give voice to an educational alternative that employs proven educational practices—real and individualized differentiated instruction, real and serious engagement of parents, ubiquitous access to information for all, and consistent and relevant feedback about performance—that will produce aptitude-defying-levels of learning among all students. I will work for new paradigm schools and technological tools.


I make this declaration knowing full well that being a rebel will be lots of work because lots of vested interests will work just as hard to maintain the dysfunctional status quo.


Join me in this space for regular updates about the education revolution. Your comments, suggestions, feedback and constructive criticism are welcome!




Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We should not work to save a School system which is always in need of repair and reconstructing. We should work in reconstructing rather than reorganizing deck chairs on a sinking ship.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 4, 6:21 AM

I will work for new paradigm schools and technological tools. I make this declaration knowing full well that being a rebel will be lots of work because lots of vested interests will work just as hard to maintain the dysfunctional status quo. Join me in this space for regular updates about the education revolution. Your comments, suggestions, feedback and constructive criticism are welcome!


David Hain's curator insight, July 5, 4:16 AM

Right on, brother!

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Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning | Professional Development

Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning | Professional Development | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One of the most exciting ideas presented in the paper is what we truly believe to be the future of teacher preparation and ongoing development--micro-credentials, likely displayed as digital badges--that would signify accomplishment and measure and reward competency-based outcomes for educators.

.

Learn more:

.

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Competency

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES, enrique rubio royo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are three parts to becoming a teacher: qualification, socialization, and subjectation. The process in the article speaks about the first one and to much lesser extent to the second, but the three are overlapping and need each other. Yes, we become qualified to teach, we are socialized to teach, but do we ever consider ourselves teachers?

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 2, 9:08 PM

Teacher preparation is an ongoing and life-long process. Without this understanding, we are at best treading water, more likely drowning, and losing ground. We should have been preparing teachers for deep learning a long time ago.

enrique rubio royo's comment, June 10, 5:27 AM
Thanks for this, muchas gracias Gust MEES
Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, June 10, 11:33 PM

One of the most exciting ideas presented in the paper is what we truly believe to be the future of teacher preparation and on-going development--micro-credentials

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Can We Create a Culture That Values Good Teaching?

Can We Create a Culture That Values Good Teaching? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We like to talk about the value of pedagogy, but we never seem to get around to rewarding it.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good teaching is probably happening without us realizing it. I read an article that suggested good teaching is about raising the standards for learning. It is a mindful experience.

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Alexa SHdez's curator insight, May 27, 11:39 AM

El docente puede inculcar cultura puesto que influye como enseña y demuestra su forma de enseñanza y la forma en como evalúa.

Bob Irving's curator insight, May 28, 8:07 AM

Addresses mostly higher ed. A welcome approach from uninformed teacher bashing. Truly great teachers are the most influential people on the planet.

Michel J. Boustani's curator insight, May 28, 8:15 AM

The title says all!

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How Should Professional Development Change?

How Should Professional Development Change? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES, Bruno Koffi
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without choice and voice, professional development might be training which is for seals and not human beings.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 9:07 AM
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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The Importance of Teaching Critical Thinking

The Importance of Teaching Critical Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is a term that is given much discussion without much action.  K-12 educators and administrators are pushed to teach the necessities as dictated by the standardized assessments in ...

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Critical-Thinking

 


Via Gust MEES, Reucover
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching critical thinking is often taught as a technique rather than asking pertinent questions which open the subject up for scrutiny.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 4, 9:04 AM
Critical thinking is a term that is given much discussion without much action.  K-12 educators and administrators are pushed to teach the necessities as dictated by the standardized assessments in ...


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Critical-Thinking


Antonio Gerardo Gutiérrez Sánchez's curator insight, October 4, 10:28 PM

agregar su visión ...

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 5, 1:19 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Students own their struggles and strengths when they lead parent-teacher conferences.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a point in saying learning is the students` responsibility. I think that means they need a bigger voice in the proceedings and this is increasingly important as they mature.

 

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Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, September 24, 10:12 AM

I love this idea.  At my son's school, the fall conferences are facilitated by the teachers, and the spring conferences are lead by the students.  It is a very nice way of allowing students to take responsibility for their effort and work-- to take pride in it, and/or recognize areas that need to be strengthened.  When students are aware that they will have to converse with their parents and teacher(s) about their work, they may take more time to ensure they are producing work that they can be proud of.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, September 25, 9:52 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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The next generation of education system [Infographic]

The next generation of education system [Infographic] | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This info-graphics provides the information about tutoring for high school students and befits and import ants of Online education system.

Via Gust MEES, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Online learning will be part of School in the future. I see School as more blended perhaps than others. The blending should be focused on personal student needs which can only be met in various ways rather than one monolithic way.

 

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Jess Ojeanto's curator insight, September 22, 1:26 PM

agregar su visión ...

Gary Harwell's curator insight, September 23, 12:36 AM

Where do we fit in?

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 23, 11:05 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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Three Tips to Focus Parent-Teacher Conferences On Creating a Partnership

Three Tips to Focus Parent-Teacher Conferences On Creating a Partnership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Parent-teacher conferences are a great time for the adults in a child's life to get on the same page about the student's educational journey at school and at home.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Parents

 

 
Via Gust MEES, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Strong and healthy parent-teacher relationships are integral to teaching, parenting, and learning. What I found the last few years of my teaching, was the School managers wanted to ensure that those relationships did not happen.

 

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The best laid lesson plans...

The best laid lesson plans... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This article was written for Sec Ed Magazine and appeared in their NQT special edition in June 2014.  You can read the original here or download the NQT Special here.There's a free info graphic to ...

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we pique curiosity, what happens when the answers are different than those in the teacher resource guide?

 

 

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Deb Kalikow-Pluck's curator insight, September 9, 1:34 PM

Check this out!

Deb Kalikow-Pluck's curator insight, September 9, 1:36 PM

Using more of your brain is a good thing.

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, September 13, 3:29 PM

Simple and effective! I like the four different components, especially 3 and 4. We sometimes focus too much on 1 and 2. Making it "Real" is important as it helps to see how things will actually unfold. Making it "Satisfying" speaks to how we sometimes make plans that fulfill the "Get it done" category but do not fulfill the deeper connections. 

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WHAT is outstanding teaching and learning? (1428x2014 pixels)

WHAT is outstanding teaching and learning? (1428x2014 pixels) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A MUST READ!

 


Via Gust MEES, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The feedback point is interesting. It is about information given to students relative to their learning goals. Feedback also means feedback for the teacher. What do we mean by student goals? What does this mean in relationship to curricula-as-plans. It suggests that teaching and learning are part of complex conversations (Pinar) and that the curricula-as-lived (Aoki) are important considerations.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 6, 8:18 AM

WHAT is outstanding teaching and learning?

A MUST READ!


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=mindset


Mark Gittos's curator insight, September 8, 2:56 AM

Very interesting

Educate Massachusetts's curator insight, September 8, 9:27 AM

Organized, clear and easy to read this infographic has important reminders for all of us in the profession of education.

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A shocking statistic about the quality of education research

A shocking statistic about the quality of education research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A research study about research studies comes up with a cautionary finding.

 

For more than a decade, school reformers have said that education policy should be driven by “research” and “data,” but there’s a big question about how much faith anyone should have in a great deal of education research. This is so not only because the samples are too small or because some research projects are funded by specific companies looking for specific results, but because in nearly all cases, it appears that nobody can be certain their results are completely accurate.


“I would love to believe that every single person doing education research around the world has ethics that are as pure as the driven snow,” Plucker said. “[But] the law of averages tells us there’s something out there.”



Via Gust MEES, ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The concept of replication has never made sense to me. We should be reproducing and reconstructing. Reproducing and reconstructing are not about identical. They are about checking more data against the original data collected. One can never replicate/duplicate the same situation so it is about similarities rather than exactness.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Educate Massachusetts's curator insight, August 22, 2:49 PM

Data is significant yet can be deceptive.  We are developing human potential and there are aspects where data is not as reliable to success as we portray.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 23, 11:42 AM

This article is about the low value placed on replication studies. It does not call into question all education research! I'd like to see how this replication issue compares to other social sciences before dismissing all ed research! 

Dylan-oliver Sinclair's curator insight, August 24, 10:48 PM

What information should be taught in schools and universities? This topic is suggesting marketing companies have influence over learning and teaching.

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Being Critically Reflective - What does it mean?

Being Critically Reflective - What does it mean? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The terms 'critical' and 'reflection' are sorely misunderstood in education. Being critical is often misinterpreted as being negative. 'Reflection' is also frequently distorted to mean "reflect on what you are doing wrong". Too often the students that we teach give negative feedback when asked to be critical. So to counter act this, educators initiate strategies such as '2 stars and a wish' and SWNI (strengths, weaknesses, new ideas).
These strategies are designed to make reflective practices a more positive experience for students. It teaches them that being critically reflective is not just a negative activity, that it is important to be positive and give feedback to help improve or make something better.
Learn more:
http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism 



Via Gust MEES, Alfred Thumser
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Karen Barad in Meeting the Universe Halfway suggests that reflection should be diffractive and Emmanuel Levinas suggested refractive. This suggests exploring the differences as the work we do is seen in the same way as light. Reflection bounces back with little change; whereas diffractive/refractive work creates a need to look closely at the blurriness and waviness that results.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 5, 6:05 PM

Critica y reflexión

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 17, 11:06 AM

add your insight...


Claudia Estrada's curator insight, August 17, 3:10 PM

This is the skill we all need to learn and urgently develop with our students.  

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Information and Communication Technologies for Construction
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Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Via Gust MEES, Sergio Scheer
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Humility is an interesting starting point for teaching, as well.

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Chris Carter's comment, July 10, 11:36 AM
Humility makes sense. Socrates knew that he was ignorant, and therefor was ready to learn. If I think that I already know a thing, or do not need to know a thing, then my mind is closed to it. All learning starts from a point of ignorance, and then move to greater approximations of understanding until mastery.
Srimayee Dam's comment, July 10, 11:43 AM
Absolutely! Most are unable to do so, unwilling to learn .. Being ignorant is fine, but lack of humility won't ever help
umh1467's curator insight, July 11, 4:57 AM

Es evidente que sólo si crees que puedes aprender lo harás.

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Student Autonomy

Student Autonomy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Empowering Students In the Classroom

 

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

 

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

They have a voiceTheir voice mattersIt will be heardIt will make a difference

 


Via Gust MEES, Silverback Learning
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Student autonomy happens with teacher autonomy. Gert Biesta proposes democracy happens in classrooms where it is lived and modeled. It is not a distant process. The word is not autonomy but emancipation which is responsible for the Other and the world we live in.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 30, 9:00 PM

This fits by 100% my meaning also!

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

  • They have a voice
  • Their voice matters
  • It will be heard
  • It will make a difference


Stevi Quate's curator insight, July 2, 9:28 AM

When John McDermott and I wrote Clock Watchers and The Just Right Challenge, we wrote about empowering students and captured similar ideas to this posting. Since these ideas aren't new and seem to be shared widely, I wonder why these ideas aren't the norm in classrooms that we watch.

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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)