Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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A Simple Cure For Education's Jargonitis

A Simple Cure For Education's Jargonitis | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It can be hard to make sense of the words used by people who want to make schools better. Here's our Reader's Guide, using the most common words in English.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is an interesting read. Gadamer said when we create technical definitions (jargon) we narrow the defintion of words. We Twitterize our language and make it easy to use a word or words as if they mean the same thing to each person.
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Education Readings March 18th

Education Readings March 18th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz This Is the Future of Education Heather McQuillan, who provided this, commented that she saw this video by John Spencer, and it really resonated. She advises that John has a great website at  http://www.spencerideas.org/ and he's…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is an emphasis on creativity in these readings. How we use technology (tools) is part of pedagogic creativity. Technology is about having conversations with and through our tools.
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Leaders: Respect Is Not a Given - Switch & Shift

Leaders: Respect Is Not a Given - Switch & Shift | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Respect is not a given. No one owes it to you. You must earn it – and here is how to do just that.
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Parker Palmer writes that authority is authored through our words and actions. This article presents a case for servant leaderhip.
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Why Mindfulness is a Good Skill for Teens to Learn - Center for Adolescent Studies

Why Mindfulness is a Good Skill for Teens to Learn - Center for Adolescent Studies | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Later this week I will have the privilege of connecting with over 300 hundred teachers, therapists, and other professionals working with teens interested in the intersection between mindfulness and youth work. This will happen at the annual Bridging The Hearts and Minds of Youth conference in San Diego, CA, and I’m lucky enough to be facilitating a workshop on working with marginalized teens—those that are adversely impacted by trauma, poverty, drugs, community violence, and oppression. One of my pre-workshop rituals ...

Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

not only for teens... When we listen to respond, rather than react, we take responsibility for our words and actions.

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, February 27, 7:30 PM

not only for teens...

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Education For Whom and For What?

Noam Chomsky, a world-renowned linguist, intellectual and political activist, spoke at the University of Arizona on Feb. 8, 2012. His lecture, "Education: Fo...

Via diane gusa
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is a rather long video, but it is important to have a broad sense of what it means to educate. The whom in the question helps us recognize that teaching and education are relational. It is about someone teaching someone something.
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Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery

Ten Disciplines of a Learner: Learning vs Mastery | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Ten Disciplines of a Learner
We decided to continue the conversation on this topic at a faculty meeting. Several meetings later we had a new report card. We decided to give two grades and average them—one for “Learning,” the other for “Mastery.”

Sara might get an “F” in mastery and an “A” in learning, culminating in a “C” for the course. To be rigorous we picked ten observable behaviors and named them “Disciplines of a Learner:”

1.     Asks questions

2.     Builds on other people’s ideas

3.     Uses mistakes as learning opportunities

4.     Takes criticism constructively

5.     Speaks up

6.     Welcomes a challenge

7.     Takes risks

8.     Listens with an openness to change

9.     Perseveres in tasks

10.   Decides when to lead and when to follow.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Working cooperatively is not cheating. It is an important skill set that helps students today and down the road.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, March 21, 2015 1:01 PM

Mastery versus Learning - Lots of thought provoking ideas here...

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 21, 2015 1:57 PM

Love this examination of 'Disciplines of a Learner" that clearly distinguishes between master and learning. I think we should demonstrate greater value to the lifelong skill of learning .

Carv Wilson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 2:01 PM

Like the questions.

 

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Design Thinking, Deconstructed

Design Thinking, Deconstructed | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives.

Via Gust MEES, Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if this is what Derrida had in mind when he used the word deconstructed?

 

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Arnie Rotenberg's curator insight, March 2, 6:25 PM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



יפה בן-דרור's curator insight, March 2, 9:10 PM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



Melanie COVINHES's curator insight, March 8, 9:29 AM
At the Nueva School in Hillsborough, Calif., design thinking is built into students' and teachers' everyday lives. The process, which is an approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, building by hand, and lots of experimentation, is documented and shared among staff.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Design-Thinking


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Learning+2+Learn



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What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble?

What Is It to Be Intellectually Humble? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Knowledge comes into us through a variety of channels that can be blocked by our concern for status, and the successful knowledge-seeker will be one who keeps those channels open. The process requires that we be able to “listen,” either literally or figuratively, to what others say. If what they say shows them to be superior to us in knowledge, we will be hampered in our learning if our first reaction is to try to show that we know as much as they or more. The process also requires that we be corrigible, that we be open to the possibility that our opinions are in some way misguided. If, whenever our status as knowers is threatened by the specter of correction, we feel that we must prove ourselves to have been in the right, we will have closed off an avenue of knowledge and crippled ourselves as inquirers. It can be particularly galling, if one lacks intellectual humility, to be corrected in a public forum; and the galling can obstruct the process of learning.

 


Via Sharrock, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Skepticism begins with our own thinking and ideas.

 

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Sharrock's curator insight, December 9, 2013 4:57 PM

The most important value for learners is humility, but it should not be considered the only value. Credibility should be held as another value, but also is not the only value of imporance.

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The World of Teaching Part 4: Teaching in the World

The World of Teaching Part 4: Teaching in the World | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A brief collection of infographics on the state of teaching around the world for teachers and would-be teachers.

Via Paul Murray
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Pay and job happiness are not directly correlated. What we should consider, is, in a country like Canada, with decent pay, why are teachers leaving the profession? It might less about pay and more about a sense of accomplishment. Does teaching have meaning for teachers?

 

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Here Are The Different Ways People Give Criticism Around The World | Communication | ICT | eSkills

Here Are The Different Ways People Give Criticism Around The World | Communication | ICT | eSkills | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As anyone who has worked abroad will tell you, a communication strategy that's effective in one country doesn't necessarily work in another.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=communication

 


Via Yashy Tohsaku, Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The American influence combines with the English and French depending on where you live in Canada.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 15, 2014 12:15 AM
As anyone who has worked abroad will tell you, a communication strategy that's effective in one country doesn't necessarily work in another.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=communication


Lisa Gorman's curator insight, April 12, 2015 11:47 AM

Out of all the Anglo Saxon countries, Australians are the most direct.  Sorry, I should have got to the point faster?!

Lisa Gorman's curator insight, April 12, 2015 11:48 AM

This fun info-graphic provides a snapshot of cultural differences including...

 

Australians are the most direct out of all the Anglo Saxon Countries!

 

Perhaps I should have got to the point more quickly?!

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Tapping into Your Students’ Individual Intelligences in the Classroom

Tapping into Your Students’ Individual Intelligences in the Classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Howard Gardner s theory of multiple intelligences changed the world of education. Before Gardner proposed that a student could have an affinity towards more than one intelligence, a student was usually put into one category that would define him for the rest of his life.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Howard-GARDNER

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am sure that Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences has changed some practices, but I don't think it has taken root across the board.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 31, 2014 3:54 PM
Howard Gardner s theory of multiple intelligences changed the world of education. Before Gardner proposed that a student could have an affinity towards more than one intelligence, a student was usually put into one category that would define him for the rest of his life.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Howard-GARDNER


The Rice Process's curator insight, October 31, 2014 10:32 PM

Effective teachers make instructional decisions based on needs of the students.  Students learn best when teachers incorporate meaningful materials with engaging activities.

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Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’

Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Do we really move from School world to the Real world? Or are they both part of each other? Dewey wrote about this a Century ago.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 30, 2014 3:16 PM

Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.


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How Should Professional Development Change?

How Should Professional Development Change? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES, Bruno Koffi
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without choice and voice, professional development might be training which is for seals and not human beings.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 2014 2:07 PM
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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Science Says Art Will Make Your Kids Better Thinkers (and Nicer People)

A new study supports our hunch that kids who are exposed to the arts gain benefits beyond just being "more creative."

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Students learn to think, judge, and communicate their feelings about what they observe.
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How Does Being an Outsider Give You a Creative Advantage?

How Does Being an Outsider Give You a Creative Advantage? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The qualities that makes a creative person unique can also make social acceptance by peers a challenge.
Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
We have to be careful with the concept of outsider as is evidenced in some current political discourse. However, the polar opposite of relativism-gond-wild is the echo chamber. Listen carefully to what outsiders have to say and respond ethically. Education and pedagogy are leadership.
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, March 18, 3:57 PM
This is, to me, yet another reason why the power of a school library is so important. Do we truly value creative problem-solving? Do we truly value independence in thought among our students? If so, the library is one of the last bastions in the public school where students who don't really "fit" can find solace, answers, acceptance, and stories that resonate and uplift. Of course, those that do fit in can find the same thing but if we really want to address ALL learners then a strong school library and a certified school librarian goes a long way towards doing so.
Cissie Bannister Burley's curator insight, March 19, 4:04 PM
This is, to me, yet another reason why the power of a school library is so important. Do we truly value creative problem-solving? Do we truly value independence in thought among our students? If so, the library is one of the last bastions in the public school where students who don't really "fit" can find solace, answers, acceptance, and stories that resonate and uplift. Of course, those that do fit in can find the same thing but if we really want to address ALL learners then a strong school library and a certified school librarian goes a long way towards doing so.
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How to share your ways of learning with students

How to share your ways of learning with students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teachers who love their teaching profession have a lot of passion for learning as well as teaching. It always thrills them when they are given a challenge of teaching most stubborn students. Many of them have given up their high paying jobs in order to pursue teaching profession. They always... https://www.allassignmenthelp.co.uk/blog/how-to-share-your-ways-of-learning-with-students/
Via Lucy White, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I once told a group of teachers I would teach for 1/2 the price. I was the least popular teacher in that room. Teaching is about passion and compassion. When we love something, we want to share it with others, hence the "com" in compassion.
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Understanding Education in a Changing World: What's Really Worth Learning

Understanding Education in a Changing World: What's Really Worth Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
David Perkins shares insights on helping educators and parents think through the all-important question: “What’s really worth learning?”

Via Nik Peachey, Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

David Jardine used Gadamer to describe the worth of whiling over what is important to teach and learn.

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, February 20, 6:19 PM

This article addresses what are truly important things to learn in today's changing world?

Lihi Telem's curator insight, February 21, 9:11 AM

ראיון מעניין עם דיוויד פרקינס לגבי התוכן והמיומניות שיש ללמד בבתי הספר של היום על מנת שיהיו רלוונטיות לתלמידים בעולם המשתנה של היום ומחר. 

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 24, 5:47 AM

Gosh HASS teachers know all this - and we need to remind ourselves

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High school students know that their learning isn't relevant | Education Recoded | Big Think

High school students know that their learning isn't relevant | Education Recoded | Big Think | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It is hard to make an argument that there are many desirable post-secondary educational or career scenarios for current high school students that will not require the use of computer technology on a daily basis. The kids have known this for quite some time now.


Via Beth Dichter, De'armond Mitchell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Several years ago, I was being professionally developed in critical thinking. It was not a session I wanted to attend, but took materials with me I used on a regular basis and simply re-designed an activity I already used. In my instructions, I commented I sent a letter/email to parents outlining a role they could play in the project as a consultant.

 

One of the facilitators, a teacher, questioned the use of parents. I smiled and replied, "When my wife goes to work, she does not close the door to her office and sequester herself. She works with others who bring particular and necessary skills." It is why I find John Dewey's writing so informative for teaching. It is hard, but rewarding teaching.

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The Creativity Mindset

The Creativity Mindset | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I absolutely love all of the emphasis on mindsets these days. There are growth mindsets (which I discuss in The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Staff Workshop) and maker mindsets (which I discuss...

Via Beth Dichter, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Philosophers such as Gadamer have written about Bildung which incorporates these characteristics as projects of self-renewal.

 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 20, 2015 9:25 PM

We often hear of growth mindset and fixed mindset. Is there also a creative mindset? Jackie Gerstein suggests that there is a creative mindset in this post. Why? If a mindset is defined as "ideas and attitudes with which a person approaches a situation"  there is a list of "ideas and attitudes" that may be part of a creative mindset. The visual above provides Gerstein's list of some items she considers important for a creative mindset. The list is also below.

* Believes in one's own creativity

* Embraces curiosity

* Suspends judgement - silences the inner critic

* Tolerates ambiguity

* Persists even when confronted with skepticism and rejection

* Taps into childlike imagination; a child's sense of wonder

Each of these is described in more detail and links to additional resources are provided. There is also a short discussion conditions necessary to facilitate creative mindset in a classroom.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:26 PM
Thanks, Beth Dichter. I find the mindsets very understandable and appealing, much like the science habits of mind.
SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:48 PM

We must stop educating students out of their creativity and foster an environment that celebrates the creative genius of the students entrusted to our care.

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Critical Friends: Building A Culture of Collaboration Between Teachers

Critical Friends: Building A Culture of Collaboration Between Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

At New Tech Network, the Critical Friends protocol is an opportunity for colleagues to engage in honest conversations about teaching and learning.


Learn more:


Collaboration:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Collaboration


Global Collaboration:


-  https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/learning-to-become-a-good-digital-citizen-digital-citizenship/






Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teaching is often done in isolation. We need to meet each other face-to-face and in the virtual space. @ivon_ehd1
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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 24, 2015 10:03 PM

At New Tech Network, the Critical Friends protocol is an opportunity for colleagues to engage in honest conversations about teaching and learning.


Learn more:


Collaboration:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Collaboration


Global Collaboration:


-  https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/learning-to-become-a-good-digital-citizen-digital-citizenship/


Vanessa Camilleri's curator insight, January 27, 2015 11:13 AM

An interesting take on projects that can offer teachers support - being resilient, is more than just individual strength. It's about peer cooperation, and the sharing of experiences. EdTech can help. 

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Tackling Controversial Issues in the Citizenship Classroom

The purpose of this resource is to provide you as teacher with


 The opportunity to reflect on a number of issues associated with teaching controversial issues in the classroom

A practical approach which allows students to explore controversial issues which arise in citizenship and other areas of the curriculum in a way which is safe for both teacher and students.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It has to be practical, because ethics is not theoretical and abstract. Kwame Appiah proposed that when ethics are strictly theoretical and abstract we make water from wine.

 

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Educational Leadership: Fundamentals of Creativity

Educational Leadership: Fundamentals of Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Gust MEES, shimrit cohen barabi
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article tries to answer some questions about creativity including what it is. There are still many questions but that is part of creativity.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 25, 2013 7:58 PM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity

 

shimrit cohen barabi's curator insight, December 4, 2014 3:18 PM

The goal of this article is to explain five fundamental insights that can guide and support educators as they endeavor to integrate student creativity into the everyday curriculum:

1) creativity takes more than originality.

2)There are different levels of creativity.

3)Contaxt matters.

4)Creativity comes at a cost.

5) Theres a time and a place for creativity.

In conclusion,  the ariter saying: "As parents, educators, and creativity researchers, we are encouraged by the increased attention being paid to creativity and the recognition that it has a role to play in schools and classrooms. It's essential, however, that education leaders develop a thorough understanding of creativity and that they take the time and care necessary to ensure that the benefits of creativity are realized in schools and classrooms".

.

Creativity Takes More Than Originality
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The six common components of good-quality teaching

The six common components of good-quality teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Six good practices

The research we reviewed suggests there are six common components that are signatures of good-quality teaching:

- Content knowledge 


- Quality of instruction


- Teaching climate 


- Classroom management


- Teacher beliefs 


- Professional behaviours 

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Great+Teachers

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=mindset

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good teaching and pedagogy is all about relating to the students and curricula. It is invitational work that allows teachers and students to meet in spaces between each other.

 

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SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, November 12, 2014 6:00 PM

I like the list but would prefer that Content not be the first thing to show up.  There are a great many people who know content, but could not teach their way out of a paper bag. 

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 10, 2015 1:20 AM

I certainly have to agree but could I add more? The only addition I think I would make would be having learners as the centre of all of the above. ;)

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The Value of Connecting the Dots to Create “Real Learning”

The Value of Connecting the Dots to Create “Real Learning” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Philadelphia center puts making connections between concepts and experiences central to the creative process for student-driven learning.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching and learning are conjoined creative processes.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 31, 2014 2:29 PM

A Philadelphia center puts making connections between concepts and experiences central to the creative process for student-driven learning.


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Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research

Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new study on the academic effects of homework offers not only some intriguing results but also a lesson on how to read a study -- and a reminder of the importance of doing just that: reading studies (carefully) rather than relying on summaries by journalists or even by the researchers themselves. Alfie Kohn explains.

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found that unless parents could help (not do) with the homework assigning it was counter-productive. Quite often, I would ask students to have a conversation with parents about a social issue or something of that nature.

 

 @ivon_ehd1

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Bibiana Vargas's curator insight, October 23, 2014 12:17 PM

Son los deberes realmente necesarios?  En esta pieza publicada en el Washington Post la evidencia muestra que no existe relación ninguna entre los resultados (notas) que obtienen los alumnos que hacen trabajos fuera del entorno escolar y los queno, y si existe es bastante modesta.  Lo que nos ahorraríamos en tiempo, esfuerzo y frustración no tendría precio!  ¿Será qué los deberes diarios pueden ser cosa del pasado?