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MIT: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013 you should know about

MIT: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013 you should know about | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it

MIT's definition of a breakthrough is simple: an advance that gives people powerful new ways to use technology. It could be an intuitive design that provides a useful interface (e.g., “Smart Watches”) or experimental devices that could allow people who have suffered brain damage to once again form memories (“Memory Implants”). Some could be key to sustainable economic growth (“Additive Manufacturing” and “Supergrids”), while others could change how we communicate (“Temporary Social Media”) or think about the unborn (“Prenatal DNA Sequencing”). Some are brilliant feats of engineering (“Baxter”), whereas others stem from attempts to rethink longstanding problems in their fields (“Deep Learning” and “Ultra-Efficient Solar Power”). As a whole, this annual list not only tells you which technologies you need to know about, but also celebrates the creativity that produced them.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Doris Palomino's insight:

There we go!

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Jean HAGUET's curator insight, August 30, 2013 6:56 AM

Very eclectic and enlightening!

Sieg Holle's curator insight, August 30, 2013 8:28 AM

technology - the great equalizer 

wallemac's comment, August 30, 2013 2:08 PM
great to see two solar verticles included in the top 10 - PV Solar and Supergrids
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Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

Via Carlos Fosca
Doris Palomino's insight:

Teachers can be leaders too... Especially, I like the fact to consider  taking personal interest in students, although I disagree to only focus on access to higher ed. The  effect of caring for your students, in general, is make them aware that teachers acknowledge their potential and, somehow, it can help students to be aware of their own potential and current skills.

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If You're Not Helping People Develop, You're Not Management Material

If You're Not Helping People Develop, You're Not Management Material | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Facilitating employee learning should be a non-negotiable competency.

Via Sandeep Gautam
Doris Palomino's insight:

Bosses play a key role making a difference in the workplace:

"(...) job candidates’ top criterion is to work with people they respect and can learn from". 

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 27, 5:14 PM

Has been non-negotiable for me:-). You help people grow and they help you grow:-)

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Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry

Why Women Collaborate, Men Work Alone, And Everybody's Angry | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
At the intersection of selfishness and team structure is an interesting lesson about gender.

Via donhornsby
Doris Palomino's insight:

"In short, men tend to overestimate their abilities and downplay those of their coworkers, while women shortchange their skills and defer to their peers".

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 6:16 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 24, 2013 6:17 AM

(From the article): So if compensation is clearly oriented toward the team, then men will jump at the chance to work more closely with their colleagues. This shows how something as simple as organizational structures--which are easy to leave unexamined--shape the behavior of the people in them. Which is why, perhaps, we should take an update from Yammer, the enterprise social network, and start iterating the way we construct our companies.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 24, 2013 10:31 AM

It is an interesting point about the inverse relationship between collaboration and women's pay. Perhaps, the demand for collaboration is part of the myth we build around organizations?

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A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next?

A Crisis Of Leadership - What's Next? | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
While today’s column could focus solely on the government shutdown or various components thereof, a lack of leadership isn’t just a problem in the United States; it’s a global problem.

Via Wise Leader™
Doris Palomino's insight:

"Whether we’re talking about executives, politicians, educators, healthcare professionals, or any other class of citizenry, we must stop tolerating those who place self-interest over service beyond self".

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k12Surfer's curator insight, October 15, 2013 4:25 PM

Worth reading....

David Hain's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:07 AM

It is a global problem, so it's all or problem.  And if we don't play a part in fixing it, we will pay the price!

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 18, 2013 4:58 AM

Excellent scoop!  Relevant and significant. 

 

From the article:

 

I would submit we find ourselves at a very similar crossroads today. We are still in need of hope and change – we are still in a crisis of leadership.


~Some of the actors may have changed seats, but the cast remains the same.


This is not a democrat versus republican issue or a liberal versus conservative issue. The issue is one that extends beyond parties, philosophies and geographic boarders.


~The issue is simply this; we have forgotten what leadership looks like.

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Gender diversity in leadership is key to business success

Gender diversity in leadership is key to business success | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
To achieve parity for women in decision-making roles, men must beware of unconscious bias
Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg jolted the gender debate when she invited more men to talk about gender, arguing that's what it will take to make change at the top.

Via Carlos Fosca
Doris Palomino's insight:

Too many CEOs tend to delegate responsibility for the empowerment of women (...). They focus on the diversity question ("how many women do we employ?") rather than the issue of inclusion, which raises more challenging questions. How many female leaders do I have? How many empowered decision-makers? How many women are serving as role models for the rest of the company's employees? Do our female employees feel included and engaged? Are we retaining them?"

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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:14 PM

"..Women perform 66% of the world's work, produce 50% of the food, and own approximately 40% of all private businesses in the formal economy. Women are expected to control approximately $28tn in consumer spending by next year yet remain gravely underrepresented at the helm of business organisations..."

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Your Team Can Smell a Rat

Your Team Can Smell a Rat | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Let’s call him Frank.He seemed so sincere, so talented, so driven. When I met him on a business trip—my former CEO and I—I liked him right away.
Doris Palomino's insight:

This story seems so familiar. I think that most of us have heard or experienced a similar story but we should especially consider these three recommendations when hiring senior leaders: (1) Do your homework, (2), Challenge them, (3) Ask them why. Involving your team to be part of the selection process can be eye-opening.

"Send your candidate to meet the team, your boss, and one or two people in the organization you admire but don’t have a vested interest in the position. They’ll all give you an outside perspective".

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Give Yourself A Chance | Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog

Give Yourself A Chance | Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
#MarshallGoldsmith: Give Yourself A Chance #leadership #management #HR - http://t.co/GwUYIreJQZ
Doris Palomino's insight:

"If we don’t treat ourselves–and the people around us–as if we have incurable genetic defects, we can get better at almost anything we choose. Why not?"

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Why Accelerating Leadership Development Is a Must - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity

Why Accelerating Leadership Development Is a Must - Chief Learning Officer, Solutions for Enterprise Productivity | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Three efficient ways to #accelerate #leadership #development, prepare for aging leaders http://t.co/nYsMrqpimc By @GKJocelynBerard
Doris Palomino's insight:

"It is commonly recognized that as adults, about 70 percent of what we learn comes from experience, 20 percent comes from others, and 10 percent comes from formal education. Development plans created for leaders are too often weak on the 70 percent and contain vague recommendations".

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Impatience as a Leadership Virtue - Let's Grow Leaders

Impatience as a Leadership Virtue - Let's Grow Leaders | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Patience is the support of weakness; impatience the ruin of strength -Charles Caleb Colton "Karin, we should be able to have this project done by the end of the year."  I listened impatiently as (Impatience as a Leadership Virtue
Doris Palomino's insight:

I completely agree with the fact that impatience can be considered a virtue in certain contexts: the status quo (that is why leaders lead change), naysayers (the challenge is to think how things could be done/solved), stagnating results (if there is a problem, one has to solve it or at least report it and ask for help), etc.


"Urgency without explanation frustrates.  Ensure the team understands how the urgency links to the bigger picture".

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Good Leaders Get Emotional

Good Leaders Get Emotional | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
But how much emotion is too much?

Via Marty Koenig
Doris Palomino's insight:

I've found this article very interesting because it is not one related to the "to be", like in articles related to emotional intelligence - which I agree is a great topic - but it is focused on the "as is". When leaders show their emotions, you really know where you are and if you can move forward or not.

"Emotional data seems less relevant in the business world where logical data reigns supreme. But it's not only relevant, It's usually the lynchpin to change and growth".

I appreciate the final remarks about how we make difference to "read" the emotions based on the gender. So much to do  and to think about.

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Te L - Us Business Solutions's comment, August 18, 2013 6:05 AM
I got you Zoi. A speaker that is passionate is infectious. A speaker that is over bearing is too much. I agree.
Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's comment, August 19, 2013 4:49 AM
Passion is the energy of life!
Efrain Teran Kaisler's curator insight, August 22, 2013 6:47 PM

La emoción es algo que te llevará donde quieres llegar pero también donde no quieres llegar solo tienes que leer , y aprenderás a ver y ser más emocional pero teniendo control de ellos, es importante ser LIDER pero en control de las emociones, no puedes ser LIDER si no eres dueño y amo de tus emocciones que sabe dirrigirlas. Para LIDERAR  a otros aprende a liderar tus emociones.

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Heroes of Leadership & Change

The men and women heroes (some are also anti-heroes) who advanced organizational thinking in theory and practice, from Frederick Taylor, Kurt Lewin, and Mary Parker Follet, to Russell Ackoff,  Chris Argyris, Sumantra Ghoshal, Larry Page and Sergey Brin (Google), to Tom Peters, Peter Senge, Alfie Kohn, John Kotter, and Gary Hamel.

 

From the BetaCodex Network´s 14th white paper. Published February 2013


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Doris Palomino's insight:

Good summary and great way to present it. Very recommendable for practitioners in the OD field.

"External superviision may correct errors. But only internal supervision can prevent their occurrence" (Eric Trist).

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:19 AM

Niels Pflaeging, the author, appreciates the need for leaders to cope with complexity and change, and understands that hierarchical organizations are a lot less effective than networked ones in doing so. His selection of "heroes" reflects this point of view.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 9, 2013 10:03 AM

There are some people who not well-known outside the leadership theory sphere.

Manish Puranik's curator insight, September 29, 2013 11:00 PM
"A complete mental revolution on the part of workingman as well as on management's side is required..."
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5 Safe Decisions That Aren't So Safe

5 Safe Decisions That Aren't So Safe | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
I’ve found safe decisions rarely are. Great leaders possess the courage to not only seek out the right decision, but they also understand the importance of giving others permission to do the same.

Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Doris Palomino's insight:

I found that there are three main issues to keep in mind for great leaders: (1) Doing the right thing, (2) not compromising your values, and (3) taking decisions when you have to do it. These situations are handled by leaders in order to foster great organizations. It reminds me about watching the forest and not only the tree.

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John Michel's curator insight, July 11, 2013 6:23 AM

We need leaders who want others to do better and be better. What we don’t need is more leaders who hide in safe harbors. Leaders don’t get paid to make safe decisions; they get paid to make the right decision.

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THE Best University Workplace Survey: the results

THE Best University Workplace Survey: the results | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Find out how academics and professional and support staff feel about working in UK higher education
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10 Qualities Every Leader of The Future Needs to Have

10 Qualities Every Leader of The Future Needs to Have | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Aggressive, result-driven leaders have long been considered the best entrepreneurs. But collaboration and communication are proving to be far more valuable these days.

Via The e.MILE Community
Doris Palomino's insight:

I believe that if you really wanna move from good to great in organizations, then you should really consider leaning on betas... ""Yet I am seeing increasing success from "beta" startup cultures where the emphasis is on collaboration, curation and communication". 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:06 AM

We are actually not doing away with command and control. We are embedding them differently and more subtly.

John Michel's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:37 AM

The closer everyone in the organization comes to achieving his or her singular potential, the more successful the business will be. Successful cultures encourage their employees to keep refreshing their toolkits, keep flexible, keep their stakes in the stream
.


Mamta Sharma's curator insight, November 4, 2013 12:33 AM

leaders are not only born they can be created too!

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Can You Handle the Truth?

Can You Handle the Truth? | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
  In his forbes.com article entitled “10 Leadership Lessons from the IBM Executive School,” author August Turak refers to a highly successful executive he knows who offers cash rewards to anyo...
Doris Palomino's insight:

I think that one of the main skills any leader should show is to be humble, humble to accept a praise and still be a down-to-earth person as well as humbble to accept things (s)he doesn't want to hear but (s)he should be open to the possibility of not beig right and, furthermore, (s)he  should be open to talk about it.

"Leaders who have to be right cannot be successful.  When you make it about you being right or wrong, then you lose perspective on the problem and make poor decisions.  You stop listening to the facts that are presented to you by your team members. And it doesn’t take long before your team stop bothering to update you when something that was your idea is not working".

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Real-life leaders

A new report by the CIPD presents a series of challenges that businesses may face when training effective leaders. It provides recommendations for a systematic approach to leadership and management development.
Doris Palomino's insight:

"The top reason for the non-motivated and/or dissatisfied employees to contribute discretionary effort is the expectation of a reward/bonus (32%), while motivated/satisfied employees cite the quality of relationship with their manager".

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10 Characteristics Of Weak Leaders - Kumar Gauraw

10 Characteristics Of Weak Leaders - Kumar Gauraw | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it

Via Karin Sebelin
Doris Palomino's insight:

"Leaders with a big ego and a Know-It-All attitude lead their teams in such a way that the people they lead are afraid of suggesting anything to them. If somebody musters the guts to suggest something, their recommendations are not considered or appreciated by the leader".

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Karin Sebelin's curator insight, September 14, 2013 4:15 AM

Read about the 10 most common characteristics of weak leaders in the article:

1.Weak Leaders Know It All
2.Weak Leaders Are Blind To Current Situation
3.Weak Leaders Avoid Rocking The Boat
4.Weak Leaders Motivate By Force
5.Weak Leaders Believe In Do-It-Yourself
6.Weak Leaders Do Not Listen To Those They Lead
7.Weak Leaders Hesitate To Take Action8.Weak Leaders Criticize And Complain
9.Weak Leaders Refuse To Take Responsibility
10.Weak Leaders Keep Changing Their Plans

John Michel's curator insight, September 14, 2013 5:18 AM

Everybody has some influence and that indicates the depth of their leadership. But then, why is it that some leaders can mobilize nations, and others, who have all the wisdom, all the knowledge in the world, have no influence? 

Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN's curator insight, October 15, 2013 7:55 PM

Nice reading

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The First Things a New Leader Should Do to Build Trust

The First Things a New Leader Should Do to Build Trust | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
As a new supervisor nearly 30 years ago and as Lockheed Martin CEO and President, building trust has always been my top priority. That’s because I’ve learned over the years that if you

Via AnYes van Rhijn
Doris Palomino's insight:

I found that these recommendations are not exclusive for new leaders but they can apply for any leader. Peoples are wise and they know when you are really honest and they realize how coherent you are. Values come first.

"It’s important to communicate that the commitment to integrity, respect and excellence starts at the top – and even more important to demonstrate that commitment through decisions and actions. Show employees that you are embracing your values, and you’ll go a long way towards building trust".

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AnYes van Rhijn's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:50 AM

Are you applying these rules? If you do, what do you see as their benefits? Are they common sense for you or do they fall under the learned behaviors category? 

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Six Principles for Developing Humility as a Leader

Six Principles for Developing Humility as a Leader | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson, Carlos Fosca
Doris Palomino's insight:

"Bluster and the alpha instinct, contends Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, professor of business psychology, often get mistaken for ability and effectiveness (at least for a while)". 

Great article. I strongly believe that no matter which leadership theory you prefer, there are some basic characteristics for any leader: humility is definitely one of them.

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Phyllis Smith's curator insight, September 11, 2013 6:58 AM

Sometimes people forget where they came from when they move up the executive ladder.  Learn how to be humble and lead by example.  Never get out of the trenches and stay close to the frontlines to be a more effective leader.

360Logica's comment, September 11, 2013 8:10 AM
Simple Living High Thinking!
360Logica's curator insight, September 11, 2013 8:10 AM

Simple Living High Thinking!

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MIT: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013 you should know about

MIT: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013 you should know about | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it

MIT's definition of a breakthrough is simple: an advance that gives people powerful new ways to use technology. It could be an intuitive design that provides a useful interface (e.g., “Smart Watches”) or experimental devices that could allow people who have suffered brain damage to once again form memories (“Memory Implants”). Some could be key to sustainable economic growth (“Additive Manufacturing” and “Supergrids”), while others could change how we communicate (“Temporary Social Media”) or think about the unborn (“Prenatal DNA Sequencing”). Some are brilliant feats of engineering (“Baxter”), whereas others stem from attempts to rethink longstanding problems in their fields (“Deep Learning” and “Ultra-Efficient Solar Power”). As a whole, this annual list not only tells you which technologies you need to know about, but also celebrates the creativity that produced them.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Doris Palomino's insight:

There we go!

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Jean HAGUET's curator insight, August 30, 2013 6:56 AM

Very eclectic and enlightening!

Sieg Holle's curator insight, August 30, 2013 8:28 AM

technology - the great equalizer 

wallemac's comment, August 30, 2013 2:08 PM
great to see two solar verticles included in the top 10 - PV Solar and Supergrids
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How Inc. 500 CEOs Approach the Toughest Task: Leadership

How Inc. 500 CEOs Approach the Toughest Task: Leadership | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it

Trustworthiness, sincerity and capacity to inspire count for a lot. Likeability, not so much.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Doris Palomino's insight:

"93% believe leading and managing are two different things"

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 23, 2013 6:29 AM

They did learn the buzzwords, and they know what is in the air in the mainstream management literature, that's for sure... they are stars and, of course, visionaries... they say, leading and managing are different but they are helluva good managers as well about their closed circle and that's management about, it's pretty sure too... However, it would be very interesting to have also a 360 review about their activities to see more clearly...:-)))

Kenneth Mikkelsen's comment, August 23, 2013 2:22 PM
Couldn't agree more Miklos. :-)
David Hain's comment, August 26, 2013 1:52 AM
Excellent notion Miklos!
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TED winner Mitra warns teachers to be ready for change

TED winner Mitra warns teachers to be ready for change | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
Newcastle, the United Kingdom. This is where Sugata Mitra, this year’s TED award winner lives and teaches. Thanks to him, millions of children in the poorest areas of the world are now…

Via Nik Peachey
Doris Palomino's insight:

Prof. Mitra's proposal reminds us about how less is more: not needing one computer per kid, but the social environment to share a resource (the computer), to dialogue among peers (the kids) and to develop a challenging and motiving task as a group (collaborative learning).

I strongly believe this experience can be taken as a referral to implement at work settings, where resources are limited, different points of view can be complement each other, and collaborative work is necessary to generate synergies to overcome different problems.

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Alexandra Guité's curator insight, August 17, 2013 10:02 AM

"Professor Mitra is a Physicist and teaches Educational Technology at Newcastle University. Some years ago he had a revolutionary idea: “The Hole in the wall”. He installed computers in the streets of the slums of India and observed that children organize by themselves and learn naturally. So have we all a teacher’s soul inside us?''

Daniel Moix's curator insight, August 18, 2013 6:39 AM

The Granny Cloud.  What an inspiring notion!

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, August 28, 2013 11:21 PM

Like it or not, things are moving in one direction, and that is where Mitra is pointing at!

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30 Outdated Leadership Practices Holding Your Company Back

30 Outdated Leadership Practices Holding Your Company Back | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
According to the American Society of Training and Development, U.S. businesses spend more than $170 Billion dollars annually on leadership-based curriculum. My question is this; to what end?

Via Susan Bainbridge
Doris Palomino's insight:

It can look simple but it is so clear! I love the fact of focusing on the why, the purpose, and find a way to get "yes" imply that people need to think about what they are doing, and not just producing and producing... Also, the idea that this is a task that cannot be done by one person, collaborate is a must as well as to take the responsibility and develop next practices. 

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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:45 PM

fácilmente traspsable al ámbito educativo

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5 Transitions Great Leaders Make That Average Leaders Don't - Forbes

5 Transitions Great Leaders Make That Average Leaders Don't - Forbes | Leadership in higher education | Scoop.it
5 Transitions Great Leaders Make That Average Leaders Don't
Forbes
The secret to leadership is there aren't any real secrets. The best leaders have simply gone to school on improving their tradecraft.

Via John Michel
Doris Palomino's insight:

The 5 key transitions the author proposes make you think about how great human beings we expect great leaders to be: (1) find purpose, (2) people first, (3) develop awareness, (4) shun complexity, and (5) get personal. And I could not agree more about the fact how many people assume the responsability to lead but only a few can do it well: "Average leaders spend time scaling processes, systems, and models – great leaders focus on scaling leadership".

 

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Philippe Vallat's comment, June 17, 2013 9:10 AM
In fact, leadership is not that complicated, one just needs to be willing to truely lead
Irene Immink's comment, June 17, 2013 9:48 AM
Indeed, good point Philippe
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 17, 2013 3:48 PM

Thanks to John, David and Wise Leader!  Great scoop.

 

From the article:

 

Develop Awareness– Great leaders are self aware, organizationally aware, culturally aware, contextually aware, and emotionally aware. They value listening, engaging, observing, and learning over pontificating. They value sensitivity over insensitivity and humility over hubris. Leaders who come across as if they know everything haven’t fooled anyone – except themselves.