Leadership in education
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How to Get the Most Out of Student-Owned Devices in Any Classroom

How to Get the Most Out of Student-Owned Devices in Any Classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Tips to make sure classroom technology is focused on asking students to be creative, collaborative and analytical.
Allan Shaw's insight:

High level advice that holds true with many details to be worked out. This process needs a positive attitude, confidence and moral support as much as technical skills and good classroom managements skills.

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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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We’re Trying To Do “The Wrong Thing Right” in Schools — Medium

We’re Trying To Do “The Wrong Thing Right” in Schools — Medium | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Whenever I think about the way most schools are structured today, I always come back to the same question: Do we do the …
Allan Shaw's insight:
This is an interesting post with much good thinking. Success lies in the balance between efficiency and effectiveness, the balance between learning and teaching. I would add feedback into the mix to create three key components but perhaps that is for another day. The balance in a strong education between efficiency and effectiveness needs to be re-calibrated more towards effectiveness. The dilemma for me is where does the new balance lay but more importantly how do we move that way and at the same time advantage the children in our care.
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Katja Rieger's curator insight, March 18, 8:31 AM
Are schools about teaching or about learning. Making schools more efficient may limit their effectiveness. Most of us know how the ideal school environment looks like, we just don't know how to achieve it with limited funds 
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Why I'm Tired of 'Grit'

The K-12 infatuation with "grit" offers an impractical and unfair model for education, writes educator James R. Delisle.
Allan Shaw's insight:
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, March 15, 12:19 AM
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 11:35 AM
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 4:57 PM
Food for thought. . . 
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Parental Reasoning And Wellbeing | The Knox School

Parental Reasoning And Wellbeing | The Knox School | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
‘When parents are asked about what determines their satisfaction with their children’s school, top of the list is their children’s welfare, that is, whether their children are happy and safe. This accords with a global study conducted last year for Fisher-Price(1), which found a shift in mothers’ aspirations for their children: today’s parents, first and foremost, want their children to be happy.’
Allan Shaw's insight:
The top factors that have emerged from our survey of parents conducted in term 4 2015 show clearly why they choose The Knox School. They are

1. Quality of teaching (95%)
2. Focus on student wellbeing (92%)
3. Balanced education (88%)
4. Quality education at reasonable expense (88%)
5. The school’s values (88%)

Parents value the development of their children’s emotional intelligence, including their capacity for resilience and the ability to communicate and collaborate.

The Knox School has developed a strong and positive student culture where student’s emotional intelligence comes to the fore. We have data to support this view. In 2015, Middle School students’ data was gathered by independent third party professionals that showed that Knox Middle School students had exceptionally positive levels of resilience, mental health and well-being, hope and optimism.
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The Importance of Leadership in Personalized Learning — Personalized Learning — Medium

The Importance of Leadership in Personalized Learning - Personalized Learning - Medium
By Michael B. Horn, Coauthor, Blended and Disrupting Class and Board Member, Education Elements
Allan Shaw's insight:

Innovation requires leadership to actively manage design, implementation & execution.

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How to Really Customize Leadership Development

How to Really Customize Leadership Development | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

Balance the organization’s contextual needs with employees’ professional learning needs.

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Contextualization invites managers to acquire — or resolve to change — the language, skills, and scripts that are expected of leaders in their organization. Personalization makes room for them to consider why and how they might do so.

Finding a balance between the two, as the example suggests, involves inviting both the organization and its managers to influence the learning agenda without letting either dictate what the other must do.

Only when that balance happens can a learning initiative develop leadership, as it puts learners in the position of leaders — between personal and organizational aims, making the most of where those converge, and addressing the areas where they diverge."

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Elemental Principles: The Measure of Success

Elemental Principles: The Measure of Success | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Allan Shaw's insight:

The importance of measuring what can be measured, the risks in doing so if it not done well, and the importance of what cannot be easily measured but that which we immediately recognise when present.

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How to Design a Classroom Built on Inquiry, Openness and Trust - @wrightsroom Mind/Shift

How to Design a Classroom Built on Inquiry, Openness and Trust - @wrightsroom  Mind/Shift | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Teachers who are interested in shifting their classrooms often don’t know where to start. It can be overwhelming, frightening, and even discouraging, especially when no one else around you seems to think the system is broken.

A question I’m asked often is, “Where should a teacher begin?” Should teachers just let students go or is there a process to good student-centered inquiry? I’ve reflected on this a fair amount, and I think small strategic steps are the key. I think letting students “go” without any structure will likely create failure, especially if students haven’t spent much time collaborating. Skills need to be modeled.

Via John Evans
Allan Shaw's insight:

Managing the direction, rate of change and teacher confidence and competence is critical in developing better classroom practice. This post provides some good classroom focused suggestions and hints.

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Frances's curator insight, January 31, 1:08 PM

Yes, learning is not a solitary activity.  Learn is the partner to teach.

Chris Carter's curator insight, February 1, 12:07 AM

All effective teaching is relational at heart. Without a modicum of trust that the teacher has the students' interests in mind, there is no ability to effectively communicate. In place of trust is an adversarial relationship in which the students attempt to protect their sense of self from the teacher.

Iolanda Bueno de Camargo Cortelazzo's curator insight, February 1, 2:08 PM

O texto traz algumas sugestões para conseguir estudantes ativos em sua aprendizagem. Nós professores precisamos conhecê-las, refletir sobre elas e decidir se adotamos ou não.


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The Classroom Is Dead — Bright — Medium

The Classroom Is Dead - Bright - Medium

For generations, thinkers have attempted to reimagine the classroom, to improve the classroom, and, of course, to disrupt the classroom, and where has all that gotten us?


Via Nik Peachey
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is a 'light touch', provocative and 'tongue in cheek' peek into a possible future. It suggests to me that the underlying issues we need to keep in mind are; the developmental needs of children and their learning, the values that drive their lives, the lives of their parents and those of the staff that work with them.

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Frances's curator insight, February 1, 2:50 PM

Crazy? Brilliant? Off Base? Possible? How do you judge new ideas about learning?

Marinhos's curator insight, February 6, 10:38 AM

Mais uma vez anunciam a morte da sala de aula. Temo que ela permaneça viva - e por muito tempo - pois continuamos a formar professores que a alimentam. Se as licenciaturas mudarem, haverá uma chance de mudarmos a escola, ainda que ela tenha sala de aulas. Se as licenciaturas permanecerem no passado, não haverá um outro futuro para a escola.

Marta Sponsiello's curator insight, March 11, 11:37 AM

An interesting and light look at the future of education.

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A Principal's Reflections: It's Not a Technology Issue - Linkis.com

A Principal's Reflections: It's Not a Technology Issue - Linkis.com | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"In a polite tone the school leader expressed his apprehension with allowing students to bring or use their own devices in school.  His main fear was a concern that students would be constantly off task texting or checking their social media accounts.  I paused for a moment to decide on an appropriate response.  Herein lies some irony. For the majority of my presentation this school leader had been disengaged himself with his technology.  As the majority of the group intently listed or participated in planned activities to apply what had been learned this individual and his buddies checked their email, surfed the web, and accessed their own social media sites."

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post is well worth reading. Learning is a cultural issue. It occurs within a social context and involves many factors: authentically engaging learning, support for learners, classroom management, use of research to conduct best practice, modelling of learning by all staff in the school of personal productivity, digital citizenship and critical digital literacies.

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Researchers Find That Frequent Tests Can Boost Learning

Researchers Find That Frequent Tests Can Boost Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Too often school assessments heighten anxiety and hinder learning. New research shows how to reverse the trend
Allan Shaw's insight:

"Retrieval practice does not use testing as a tool of assessment. Rather it treats tests as occasions for learning, which makes sense only once we recognize that we have misunderstood the nature of testing. We think of tests as a kind of dipstick that we insert into a student's head, an indicator that tells us how high the level of knowledge has risen in there—when in fact, every time a student calls up knowledge from memory, that memory changes. Its mental representation becomes stronger, more stable and more accessible."

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The 4 Abilities Required of Agile Leaders

The 4 Abilities Required of Agile Leaders | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Being an agile leader refers to remaining flexible, growing from your own mistakes and rising above the wide array of challenges you face.
Allan Shaw's insight:

"There’s a fine line between arrogance and confidence. Don’t be that person! Confidence will build your business. Arrogance will destroy it twice as fast. Never turn a deaf ear to what your customers or employees are telling you about your product or company.

Listening doesn’t mean agreeing with everything they say, but you must have a healthy sense of self-awareness if you’re going to remain in business for the long haul."

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National Institute for Student-Centered Education -

National Institute for Student-Centered Education - | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The National Institute for Student-Centered Education (NISCE) aims to catalyze support for a vision of education where students—not politics, not tests, not expediency—are at the center of learning, and where all students have the opportunities and resources they need to succeed.
Allan Shaw's insight:

A site possibly worth bookmarking and investigation!

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Want Students to Learn? Don’t Just Tell Them What You Are Teaching

Want Students to Learn? Don’t Just Tell Them What You Are Teaching | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“Life is not a matter of chance... it is a matter of choice.” ― Ka Should we leave our students' learning up to chance? The answer seems simple enough right? But its application isn’t automatic. It is a conscious choice we must make as educators.

Allan Shaw's insight:
This is an engaging and quite complex post. It touches on a lot of territory - use of learning objectives, backwards by design planning, various presentation processes, good strategies for remembering material, nothing is ever perfect, professional reflection, professional growth ...
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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.
Allan Shaw's insight:
I can attest to the positive influence of mindfulness and/or meditation in my work, similarly to the author of this post. 'Observe more, react less' is indeed a useful mantra to maintain some objectivity in a busy professional life.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 11:33 AM
I can attest to the positive influence of mindfulness and/or meditation in my work, similarly to the author of this post. 'Observe more, react less' is indeed a useful mantra to maintain some objectivity in a busy professional life.
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Overwhelmed? 10 ways to feel less busy

Overwhelmed? 10 ways to feel less busy | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
You can’t do it all, so try Oliver Burkeman’s tips to reclaim your time and your sanity
Allan Shaw's insight:
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, March 14, 11:48 PM
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 11:35 AM
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
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‘Enrolment churn’ bad news for learning outcomes

‘Enrolment churn’ bad news for learning outcomes | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
New research reveals students who change schools are more likely to underperform in literacy and numeracy, as well as drop out of school.
Allan Shaw's insight:
Positive working relationships between parents and teachers, stability and consistency are critical to a child's success at school. Positive relationships, stability and consistency require focus and effort on the part of both the school and parents.
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6 Things Great Leaders Do Differently

6 Things Great Leaders Do Differently | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Too many people succumb to the mistaken belief that leadership skills are natural traits that belong only to a lucky few.
Allan Shaw's insight:

There are six critical things that great leaders do that really stand out. Any of us can do the same.

1. They're kind without being weak

 

2. They're strong without being harsh

 

3. They're confident, without being cocky

 

4. They stay positive, but remain realistic

 

5. They're role models, not preachers

 

6. They're willing to take a bullet for their people

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Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 5:11 PM
Leadership Traits - able to be learned?
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The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

We will discuss the video.

We will discuss the story.

We will discuss our results.

Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

Via John Evans
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post is an excellent list of classroom discussion strategies. They are applicable to the classroom, but also to any need for discussion among children or adult groups. School leaders should have influence over the quality of discussion and learning in classrooms but also the quality of discussion and learning among staff.

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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, February 18, 5:15 PM

Great article with a list of specific strategies. 

Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 22, 5:57 PM

Discussion is required for learning in every level of classrooms. This article offers both  high level planning and low level planning. Well worth the time to read this.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 5:20 PM
Genuine class discussions -- singing my song!
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A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"The modern learner has to sift through a lot of information.

That means higher level thinking skills like analysis and evaluation are necessary just to reduce all the noise and establish the credibility of information.

There is also the matter of utility. Evaluating information depends as much on context and circumstance as it does the nature of the data itself."

 


Via Yashy Tohsaku
Allan Shaw's insight:

The diagram is coherent and appropriate. Complex, also, but then simplifying teaching too much means the diagram becomes trite and possibly misleading.

Good teaching is complex and difficult and we often neglect that to our detriment.

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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, February 3, 2:00 PM

Interesting diagram including many of the complex components for today's teacher. Following this diagram will engage learners.

Joe McDonough's curator insight, February 5, 10:11 PM

I'd like to see "Ethics" listed... maybe on the "Encouraging reflection" vector.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 5:21 PM
Professional Development ideas
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Computing At School | Computational Thinking - A guide for teachers

Computing At School | Computational Thinking - A guide for teachers | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

This guide published in the UK aims to help develop a shared understanding of the teaching of computational thinking in schools. It presents a conceptual framework of computational thinking, describes pedagogic approaches for teaching and offers guides for assessment.

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

For those in Australia or places other than the UK who would like to understand more about what occurs in other places, this guide published in the UK aims to help develop a shared understanding of the teaching of computational thinking in schools. It presents a conceptual framework of computational thinking, describes pedagogic approaches for teaching and offers guides for assessment.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 31, 4:45 PM

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:


[Gust MEES]: Please check ALSO my #ICT #PracTICE <===>https://gustmees.wordpress.com/.../design-the-learning.../

 
 
 

<===> #PLN #Collaboration #PKM #SocialMedia #Design #DesignTHINKing#CriticalTHINKing #ProactiveTHINKing #DigitalCitiZENship #CyberSecurity#LEARNing2LEARN #Organization #Blogging



Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, February 4, 1:12 PM

Time has to be given to teachers to learn, be a part of and use this in meaningful ways.

junewall's curator insight, February 10, 11:37 PM

An overview with top level examples of what each aspect of computational thinking is about. I particularly note that while the examples are in respect to programming (mostly) all of the strategies or actions can be used in all subjects not just ICT. 

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10 Most Desired Attributes of Successful Leadership

10 Most Desired Attributes of Successful Leadership | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"As Napoleon Bonaparte once said, “A leader is a dealer in hope”. A true leader is one who weaves dreams or envision goals that others are unable to fathom, playing on the front to achieve goals and lead by example."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The list will not be surprising! That said, it is good to have the attributes listed and to be able to keep them in mind. For me, the most difficult aspect is to keep myself 'up to my own standards', to keep myself improving, and maintain the focus and energy, even when tired and when events may not be working out smoothly.

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Peer Pressure Has a Positive Side - Scientific American

Peer Pressure Has a Positive Side - Scientific American | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"...schools focus primarily on students as individual entities. What would happen if educators instead took advantage of the fact that teens are powerfully compelled to think in social terms? In Social, Lieberman lays out a number of ways to do so. History and English could be presented through the lens of the psychological drives of the people involved. One could therefore present Napoleon in terms of his desire to impress or Churchill in terms of his lonely melancholy. Less inherently interpersonal subjects, such as math, could acquire a social aspect through team problem solving and peer tutoring. Research shows that when we absorb information in order to teach it to someone else, we learn it more accurately and deeply, perhaps in part because we are engaging our social cognition."

Allan Shaw's insight:

A post worthy of reading and reflection. Many worry about the lack of adult like responsibility or child like good natured compliance in our adolescents. This post provides an opportunity to reconsider the adolescent brain to improve learning outcomes for teenagers and improve our own well-being by not worrying about them as much.

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The State Trooper and I

The State Trooper and I | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

5 Lessons from speeding tickets:
Consequences say decisions matter. Life without consequences – either good or bad – is meaningless.
Consequences express compassion, when delivered with a person’s best interest in mind.
Don’t feel responsible to help irresponsibility. Too much help doesn’t help.
Deal quickly with issues. It’s irresponsible to neglect holding people responsible.
Create an environment where performance is expected, enjoyed, and honored.

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post is a succinct little story about speeding tickets and the lessons that can be learned from consequences of the lack of them.

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Why screen time before bed is bad for children

Why screen time before bed is bad for children | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Screen time – by way of watching television or using computers, mobile phones and other electronic mobile devices – may be having a large and negative impact on children’s sleep.
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is an excellent easy to read synopsis of the health issues for young people regarding screen time at night.

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The Incredible Importance of Body Language

The Incredible Importance of Body Language | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
From how to stand to internal psychology, here are the benefits of being mindful of how you act.
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Allan Shaw's curator insight, August 28, 2015 12:09 AM

Being mindful of how you act and are perceived is an important component of how a school leader should operate. Sometimes you might feel like you are carrying the weight of the world or at least the school, but attention to little things, gentle confidence and care with body language can all assist in making the role a little easier and more successful.