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Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger

Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'Success destroys leaders by encouraging them to repeat the past. Leadership is always about the future. Repetition: Repeating the past prevents you from building on it. Success confirms and solidifies, then it destroys.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

An interesting post in relation to school leadership where repeating past success is often seen as exactly what should be done! There is some truth in saying that children and young adults in schools need continuity and consistency for their successful development. Yet there is also truth in saying that we should:

- examine success as much as we examine failure and check for its continued usefulness.

- providing consistency and continuity is not the same as 'drifting'

- do not assume that repeating the past will create the future most appropriate for children and young adults.

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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 2014 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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Are You A Professional LEARNER or a Professional Leaner?

Are You A Professional LEARNER or a Professional Leaner? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Recently I got the opportunity to work with one of the state’s top performing schools....One of the defining characteristics of the school is the clarity and commitment that all the professionals in the place have regarding the following statement:  WE ARE LEARNERS.  Leaners or leaning behaviours are simply not tolerated in this workplace.  Leaners prop up against the comfort zone and maintain a strong sense of complacency.

Allan Shaw's insight:

This is a neat post from Tracey Ezard. The distinction between teachers as 'learners' or 'leaners' is useful. The alliteration of 'learners' or 'leaners' is simple to remember and the image of complacent teachers as 'leaners' is evocative. The examples given are also true in my experience. While I do not often find false dichotomies attractive, this simple distinction would be good to use with fellow teachers. The post also provides access to an infographic on the same topic.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 25, 4:51 PM

Recently I got the opportunity to work with one of the state’s top performing schools....One of the defining characteristics of the school is the clarity and commitment that all the professionals in the place have regarding the following statement:  WE ARE LEARNERS.  Leaners or leaning behaviours are simply not tolerated in this workplace.  Leaners prop up against the comfort zone and maintain a strong sense of complacency.


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Education: Aiming high boosts esteem

Education: Aiming high boosts esteem | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Instilling pride in a school can motivate staff and students to achieve.
Allan Shaw's insight:

High expectations, modelling appropriate attitudes and behaviours and positive reinforcement (continually) are some of the ingredients of building a successful school, improving an already successful school or simply and most importantly developing fine young people who will influence the world in good ways!

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, April 26, 6:23 PM

High expectations, modelling appropriate attitudes and behaviours and positive reinforcement (continually) are some of the ingredients of building a successful school, improving an already successful school or simply and most importantly developing fine young people who will influence the world in good ways!

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Ten Trends 2015: Learner orientation | EDtalks

Ten Trends 2015: Learner orientation | EDtalks | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'Learner at the centre'. A goal to drive attitude and action.

Allan Shaw's insight:

'Learner at the centre'. A goal to drive attitude and action. This is a succinct little video clip worthy of your attention. I doubt many would disagree with its concepts but making them come to fruition is much harder work. Revising habits, systems and processes of the past is indeed gritty work but needs to be done, continually if carefully and mindfully.

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Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning

Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'If you suspect that curious kids fare better in careers and life, you're right—for a variety of reasons. Research suggests that intellectual curiosity has as big of an effect on performance as hard work. (link is external) When put together, curiosity and hard work account for success just as much as intelligence.

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Another study found that people who were curious about a topic retained what they learned for longer periods of time (link is external). And even more impressive, research has linked curiosity to a wide range of important adaptive behaviors, (link is external) including tolerance of anxiety and uncertainty, positive emotions, humor, playfulness, out-of-box thinking, and a noncritical attitude—all attributes associated with healthy social outcomes.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post explains the importance of curiosity and lists ten strategies to sue to develop curiosity. We worth reading and for reflection to consider using in classrooms.

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Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015

Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Smartphones are fueling a shift in the communication landscape for teens. Nearly three-quarters of teens now use smartphones and 92% of teens report going
Allan Shaw's insight:

Whilst US data, this Pew Research Center material is reassuring in one way. It confirms what I see anecdotally in my community in another country. This is useful background information for educators.

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21st Century Smart: Staying Relevant In The Artificial Intelligence Age

21st Century Smart: Staying Relevant In The Artificial Intelligence Age | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Unless you have been under a rock, you know that the world is changing fast. You know that technology advances, especially smart robots and smart thinking machines, will continue to drive change. They will raise serious questions about how anyone over the age of 18 stays relevant and competitive job-wise [...]
Allan Shaw's insight:

Professor Ed Hess lists seven new habits to cultivate to build relevance and competence in a coming age of smart machines. I would see the seven habits as those required of anyone wishing to positively influence, lead or work with others now and in the past. They make good sense for positive human relationships.

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Mindset, attitude and behaviour

Mindset, attitude and behaviour | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Mindset posters, assemblies and other messages from staff might change student attitude about mindset i.e. that a growth mindset is preferable in terms of improving achievement, but will they change student behaviour?  Will they bring about a change in terms of how a student actually ‘works’, that will shift them more towards a growth mindset?  Probably not.  In order to achieve this, we would be more sensible using our time to come up with a ‘toolbox of strategies’ that students can use in lessons, everyday, to foster a growth mindset. We need to look at changing their behaviours as well as their attitude.  Just telling students to put more ‘effort’ into their work is not useful – they need to know what this means."

Allan Shaw's insight:

Changing attitudes and behaviour is hard work for all concerned. It is cultural change and so much of our culture is ingrained and habitual. As a result, attitudes and behaviours are not at the forefront of our conscious mind and thus not reflected upon simply. Change without reflection and focus does not happen unless 'inflicted' externally and then will only last while the pressure is applied. Cultural change requires external incentives, internalised reflection and focus on developing better attitudes and behaviours all applied over time.

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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers
Allan Shaw's insight:

Research suggests that homework for primary age students is problematic, the more so the younger the students. At the other end of the spectrum, students in year 12 gain significantly from productive work outside of the classroom. This chart is worthy of reflection about how to frame work outside the classroom.

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7 Ways to Save Another's face

7 Ways to Save Another's face | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
7 ways to save another’s face:

Leaders protect the dignity of others.

Be yourself. Don’t feel the need to lift yourself by putting others down.
Believe others want to help, unless there’s clear evidence to the contrary.
Ask, “What am I missing,” when you feel someone pushing back. Avoid the trap of pushing back when you feel push back.
Bolster the image of others in the eyes of others.
Speak in private when confronting or challenging.
Employ good manners, always. Another’s poor behavior is never an excuse for you to behave in-kind.
Speak the truth with kindness. Smile, unless a smile might seem frivolous or disrespectful.

Feeling respect is feeling valued. Giving respect is valuing others.
Allan Shaw's insight:

Seven ways to save another's face is a good list to use. This post also lists 12 ways to humiliate others. I am guilty of some of these some of the time. It is a good list to try and avoid and if focusing on the seven items in the more positive list, you will be lead away from the negative activities.

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Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors. If you aspire for your organization to be faster, more innovative, less afraid..."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The info-graphic embedded in this post and used as the illustration is a a wonderful list by which to make a self assessment. To my mind leadership is a commitment, transparency, communication to many, etc. are the measures that I excite and inspire me in my school leader role.

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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, March 22, 8:58 PM

Imagine if we all became a little bit more innovative...

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11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs

11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
11 reasons why Steve Jobs is still the world's best business communicator.
Allan Shaw's insight:

11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs. If public speaking and presentations are a part of your role and this would include all teachers and school leaders, then this is worth a look. There are many lessons here that are not much more than common sense, but together they are a very useful set of communication skills.

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Parent Engagement: Where does your school fit in the continuum ?

Moving schools and communities through the Family-School and Community Engagement Continuum. An Infographic.

Allan Shaw's insight:

Parent Engagement: An info-graphic. This is a neat little thought starter on parent engagement in a school education context.

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Perceptions of BYOT

Perceptions of BYOT | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
When you see a student with a personal mobile device in the classroom, what do you think is happening with that device? In the above illustration, what is the student doing? Here are some possibili...

Via Mal Lee
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post sums up the conundrums facing school school leaders. Where is the balance drawn. Ban devices, run hard with BYOT or somewhere in between? To my mind the balance must include not only the staff at the school (not just teachers, though they are critical) but also parents and students. The community needs to be involved in an ongoing dialogue where decisions will move with discussion and time.

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The Paradox Of Chaos

The Paradox Of Chaos | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"We strive for order, both in our professional and personal life.  Without order, there would be mayhem and bedlam throughout our world.  We would live life in a perpetual state of turmoil and upheaval.  It would be a world ruled by confusion and chaos…and constant change.

However,...“The things we fear most in organizations – fluctuations, disturbances, imbalances – are the primary sources of creativity.”  -Margaret J. Wheatley"

 

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post by DCulberhouse is interesting. The Paradox of Chaos is an apt title - change, doubt and confusion on one hand and opportunity for invention on the other.

However, in dealing with children and parents one needs to be very careful. A stable emotional environment is vital to build confidence in children. Thus the values that underpin operations need to be explicit and maintained. The partnership with parents must be developed, nurtured and maintained.

The greater understanding of how children learn, the influences of digital technologies and broader societal changes are all bringing pressures to bear, challenges to tackle and advantageous opportunities for schools.

Our challenge as educational leaders is to keep the values and human interactions stable and positive, analyse and take advantage of the opportunities as they arise and carefully explain these opportunities to parents as they develop.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 24, 6:29 AM

The balance between order and chaos matters! Nice article.

Damla Ofis Büro Mobilyaları's comment, May 24, 4:43 PM
http://www.damlaofis.com.tr/ahsap-dolaplar-pmu447
Marc Wachtfogel, PhD's comment, May 25, 11:46 AM
Thanks David and Allan for great insight!!
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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Are you planning and communicating your feedback criteria? Here is our Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Design, an infographic to help you plan better assessments.

Via Dennis T OConnor
Allan Shaw's insight:

'In the infographic, Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy, we have organized types of activities that suit various levels of assessments (2001) starting with remember, understand, and apply in the first row. The second row of our infographic includes higher levels of active learning including analyze, evaluate, and create. Engaging curriculum whether face-to-face, blended, or online push student performances to these levels of learning; however, these assessments are less conducive to automated feedback systems as rubrics typically require intelligent judgment. The appropriate level of learning for any assessment should be determined by the learning objective(s).' - This is worthy of your time and reflection.

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, April 26, 6:18 PM

'In the infographic, Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy, we have organized types of activities that suit various levels of assessments (2001) starting with remember, understand, and apply in the first row. The second row of our infographic includes higher levels of active learning including analyze, evaluate, and create. Engaging curriculum whether face-to-face, blended, or online push student performances to these levels of learning; however, these assessments are less conducive to automated feedback systems as rubrics typically require intelligent judgment. The appropriate level of learning for any assessment should be determined by the learning objective(s).' - This is worthy of your time and reflection.

Georgia Heffernan's curator insight, April 26, 7:43 PM

To enable our students to become assessment literate, teachers need to align their assessment feedback practices with the purpose of the learning. This info graphic provides an easy to use guide based on Bloom's taxonomy of developmental learning - a good reminder to be deliberate!

Gary Stanyard's curator insight, April 29, 5:56 PM

Useful infographic

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Appreciating people key to leadership

Appreciating people key to leadership | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The soft stuff can really make a hard difference.
Allan Shaw's insight:

'"Don't bypass the heart", appreciating people is the key to leadership' as a friend and colleague of mine eloquently commented.

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Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Students own their struggles and strengths when they lead parent-teacher conferences.
Allan Shaw's insight:

I think this quote from the post sums up why this is useful and well worth reading and reflecting upon. 'At California’s Impact Academy, three or four different sets of students and their families meet simultaneously, as teachers circulate through the room, making sure parents are getting their questions answered, and only intervening if the student is struggling. Yet in all cases, the basic spirit is the same: this is the student’s moment to share his or her reflections on achievements and challenges.'

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10 Phrases Incompetent Leaders Keep Saying and 10 Ways to Rise

10 Phrases Incompetent Leaders Keep Saying and 10 Ways to Rise | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Everyone who gets ahead establishes a track record of reliability." What you say and how it is said does mattter.

Allan Shaw's insight:

The ten phrases incompetent leaders or indeed those without confidence use are correct, but I the ten ways to improve are much more useful. The improvements are commonsensical but harder to live out as a matter of course each day.

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3 Things That Have Slowed the Change Process Down in Education (And What We Can Do About It)

3 Things That Have Slowed the Change Process Down in Education (And What We Can Do About It) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"To become a master teacher, you must become a master learner....Classroom teaching has long been an isolating profession where collaborative talk was difficult if near impossible. With social media, that isolation is now a choice educators make."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The three things this post focuses upon as working against innovation in education are firstly, professional isolation of teachers preventing collaborative discussion, secondly, a continuous focus on student weaknesses, rather than building upon their strengths, loves and passions and thirdly, experience is a very powerful teacher and in what other profession do neophytes come to the profession with up to 16 years of watching others fulfill the role!

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The Algorithm

The Algorithm | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
“What are people going to do for a living when their muscle power is no longer valued because we have all kinds of muscle accelerators and then their mental power is not as valued anymore because we have these astonishing digital technologies that can do mental things, cognitive things that we used to previously require people to do?” -Andrew MacAfee excerpt from ‘Most Likely To Succeed’
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post poses significant questions for school leaders, answers to which requires thought on my part. I agree with the description of the societal shifts occurring around us right now. For example the original iPhone is less than 8 years old! In that time smart phones have made significant impact on our lives; just walk down a street! I'm not a supporter of stopping technological development; that is near impossible. How do we manage some of the influences?

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The Science Behind Gratitude (and How It Can Change Your Life)

The Science Behind Gratitude (and How It Can Change Your Life) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
People who take time to reflect upon the things they're thankful for are happier, sleep better, and have stronger immunity. Here's how to make it work for you.
Allan Shaw's insight:

Aaah! It sounds simple and perhaps even a bit silly for the hard bitten amongst us, but it seems to work for me! It takes a conscious effort but is worthwhile.

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How to Be a Genius in Seven Questions

How to Be a Genius in Seven Questions | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"At the beginning, you offer answers. In the end it's about questions. The right answer is always preceded by the right question....If your organisation expects leaders to have answers, ....in truth it's institutional helplessness that makes others expect answers from you."

Allan Shaw's insight:

It's been a difficult skill to stop and think about asking a good question rather than provide an answer. A good point in between is to offer options, joining in the quest for the best solution. In school education there can be several 'right' answers; it takes a little time, reflection and discussion to tease out the best in the current circumstances.

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How Steve Jobs Fouled Up Presentations For The Rest of Us

How Steve Jobs Fouled Up Presentations For The Rest of Us | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
VideoUntil his passing three years ago Steve Jobs was widely recognized as the standard bearer for effective presentation method and technique. And he was tremendous. But here’s the trouble with Steve Jobs the presenter: he was an immensely charismatic individual pitching some of the most exciting consumer technology the world [...]
Allan Shaw's insight:

Presentations: Another view. Perhaps, like me, you're not as good at a 'stand and deliver' presentation as Steve Jobs was, or are not prepared to set aside the time required to get it perfect. In which case this post can provide some other interesting alternatives.

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Six ways Australia's education system is failing our kids

Six ways Australia's education system is failing our kids | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Australia's facing a slow decline in most educational standards and few are aware just how bad the situation is getting.
Allan Shaw's insight:

As an experienced educator, these six reasons make sense. They need to be addressed, though some of the headline suggestions put forward for improvement seem glib. Perhaps a greater societal focus on values leadership, the development of character, preparedness to take on tougher (learning) challenges, and a recognition that education needs more than worthy platitudes by politicians and policy makers to be successful.

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects'

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy. Which makes it all the more remarkable that Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional “teaching by subject” in favour of “teaching by topic”.

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional “teaching by subject” in favour of “teaching by topic”." This will be an interesting development to observe. I will be very interested in the education component, pedagogical approaches and measure of success gained. I will also be interested in the commentary of education policy makers and politicians who have cited Finland as worthy of emulation.

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