Leadership in education
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Khan Academy Is Not The Progressive Model You Are Looking For | edte.ch

There has been a great deal written about Khan Academy just recently and the concept of personalised instruction and how this is somehow revolutionary or some
Allan Shaw's insight:

'A child using Khan Academy will be able to get a personalised set of exercises, tailored just for them, but not the meaningful choice driven application of those ideas.' Is this sufficient or even a step in the right direction?

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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 2014 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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Lost in translation – shattering neuromyths

Research to set right common neuromyths that are held by teachers.

Allan Shaw's insight:
Much information is transferred by teachers to other teachers via conversations across desks and over a cup of tea or coffee. In such circumstances it is reasonable to assume that accuracy, detail and nuance of research can be lost. It is not reasonable that such conversations are accepted and passed on rather than used as the basis for reading, checking and learning by those teachers involved. After all, we do wish to be regarded as professionals and thus need to act in such manner.
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Pepsi CEO: Break With the Past, and Don’t Play Too Nice

Pepsi CEO: Break With the Past, and Don’t Play Too Nice | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Six management tips from Indra Nooyi, one of the most powerful women in business.
Allan Shaw's insight:
In terms of school development and innovation, the thoughts outlined in this post run counter intuitive to the prevailing norms, which wee success as 'sensibly' paced and culturally careful. Maybe disruption from various directions might turn more to this style of operation?
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How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture - Mind/Shift

How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture - Mind/Shift | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Adilene Rodriguez admits she has always struggled with academics. Especially in middle school she hated getting up early, found her classes boring and didn’t really see where it was all going. When she started her freshman year at Arroyo High School in San Lorenzo, California, just south of Oakland, she was a shy student who rarely spoke up in class and had little confidence in herself as a scholar.

Rodriguez is now a senior and her approach to school has changed dramatically over her high school career. She attributes her shift to her freshman science teacher, Jim Clark, who taught the class about growth mindset from the very beginning and backed up the discussion with action.

“He would tell me, ‘You need to push yourself, that’s how you’re going to grow. Be confident. You’re not always going to be successful on your first tries, but you can get there,’ ” Rodriguez said

Via John Evans
Allan Shaw's insight:
"She also tries hard to model a growth mindset to her students by being open about her own struggles as a parent and a teacher. “They’re not used to teachers apologizing,” Rodgers said. “But I tell them I’m going to make mistakes all the time. And I think showing that helps them realize they can actually make mistakes.” When teachers and administrators say they want kids to have a growth mindset, the school environment has to back up that rhetoric. At Arroyo, the emphasis on growth mindset came alongside a shift to standards-based grading. Kids can see that mistakes along the way aren’t negatively affecting them and keep working to master the concepts. “When you believe it; they believe,” Rodgers said. “If I didn’t believe this, they wouldn’t buy what I’m selling.”"
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J A Jones's curator insight, February 10, 10:24 AM

Carol Dweck"s book Mindset is a great resource for teachers who want to learn more about this topic.

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The Building Blocks of Learning

The Building Blocks of Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The good news in education is that attention is finally turning to the psychic and emotional qualities that children bring to the classroom.
Allan Shaw's insight:
"research... which shows that while some teachers are good at raising their students’ test scores, other teachers are really good at improving their students’ school engagement. Teachers in the first group are amply rewarded these days, but teachers who motivate their students to show up every day and throw themselves into school life may not even realize how good they are, because emotional engagement is not something we measure and stress. Teachers are now called upon not only to teach biology but to create a culture: a culture of caring criticism, so students feel loved while they improve; a culture of belonging, so fragile students feel their work has value. Suddenly, teachers must teach students how to feel about their own feelings; how not to be swallowed up by moments of failure, anger and sadness, but to slow the moment and step outside the emotional spiral." Summed up well!
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The skills needed in the 21st century - New Vision for Education

To thrive in today’s innovation-driven economy, workers need a different mix of skills than in the past. In addition to foundational skills like literacy and numeracy, they need competencies like collaboration, creativity and problem-solving, and character qualities like persistence, curiosity and initiative.
Allan Shaw's insight:
This is an excellent infographic. 10 of these 16 skills are 'soft' or 'people' skills. It is no longer sufficient to have a good knowledge base. Success is dependent upon a good knowledge base and more.
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3 ‘Knowns’ in Learning Science—and How to Apply Them in Practice (EdSurge News)

3 ‘Knowns’ in Learning Science—and How to Apply Them in Practice (EdSurge News) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"The key to unlocking a brighter future for students lies within the understanding and application of learning science. As a data scientist and edtech developer, I believe our job is not about inventing the next shiny digital device; it’s about improving education outcomes for students, and doing so demonstrably and empirically with research. And the starting point for that is looking at what we already know from the science of learning."

Allan Shaw's insight:
This is a beautiful synopsis of three significant learning science 'knowns'!
1. Bloom's 2 Sigma Problem, where tutoring one on one leads to significantly better learning outcomes
2. Deliberate practice
- Intentional Practice where practice has to have a very specific intention and needs to match and be appropriate to the current level of skill development and the next targeted level.
- Challenge exceeds skill. Learning occurs only when what we need to be able to do exceeds our skill level. Learners resist being in this zone. All skill development requires staying in a zone for prolonged periods, and we are naturally averse to that.
- Immediate Feedback. In most learning situations the lag between performance and feedback is too long. This is a challenge to teachers given the constraints on their time and resources. Deliberate practice requires that the lag time between performance and feedback approach zero.
- Repetition to Automaticity.
3. 'Nudge analytics', where one of the aims is to discover empirically the right insights along with the small nudges that can make the insights actionable.
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Ten Teaching Trends from the Innovating Pedagogy Report - TeachOnline

Ten Teaching Trends from the Innovating Pedagogy Report - TeachOnline | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
How are today's most innovative educators engaging with their students? The 2015 Innovating Pedagogy report proposes ten innovations to engage students.
Allan Shaw's insight:
I'm not sure these are innovations. Good teachers have been doing these or some of these for years! It helps to have been around for a while. That said, it is great to see them listed together. It is always wise to remembers much of a child's learning occurs away from school, maybe 80% is contextual, incidental, informal, or practical experimentation on a weekend, let alone when a teacher uses these strategies within the school day.
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Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck

Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

Encouraging students' growth mindset is about more than just praising raw effort, Stanford Professor Carol Dweck said at an Education Week event. Read of six smart and sensible tips and watch her full remarks here.

Allan Shaw's insight:
These six points are worthy to consider to slow down the hyped and overly simplistic response that Dweck's Mindset work can induce in those looking for simple solutions to complex matters or simple reasons to reject the research.
1. Acknowledge the nuance in the research. 
2. Everyone has a fixed mindset sometimes. 
3. Name your fixed mindset.
4. Move beyond effort.
5. Put mindsets into a greater school-culture context.
6. Don't use mindsets to label others or yourself.
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Leadership Tipping Points

Leadership Tipping Points | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
If you want the same result, keep doing the same thing. You must do something different, if you expect to find new tipping points.   First: Lead the way by being the first one to change. Stop expecting others to change and not changing yourself. Change is easy when someone else  is doing the changing. The…
Allan Shaw's insight:
Using disruption to change how you work is confronting and demanding. If you wish to lead by example, then it is necessary, if only to maintain your own sense of credibility and integrity. Dealing with disruption and your own change is doubly demanding but rewarding.
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Want Students to Learn? Don’t Just Tell Them What You Are Teaching

Want Students to Learn? Don’t Just Tell Them What You Are Teaching | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“Life is not a matter of chance... it is a matter of choice.” ― Ka Should we leave our students' learning up to chance? The answer seems simple enough right? But its application isn’t automatic. It is a conscious choice we must make as educators.

Allan Shaw's insight:
This is an engaging and quite complex post. It touches on a lot of territory - use of learning objectives, backwards by design planning, various presentation processes, good strategies for remembering material, nothing is ever perfect, professional reflection, professional growth ...
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Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company

Want to be a better leader? Observe more and react less | McKinsey & Company | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Overloaded executives need coping mechanisms. This personal reflection shows how meditation can help.
Allan Shaw's insight:
I can attest to the positive influence of mindfulness and/or meditation in my work, similarly to the author of this post. 'Observe more, react less' is indeed a useful mantra to maintain some objectivity in a busy professional life.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 7:33 AM
I can attest to the positive influence of mindfulness and/or meditation in my work, similarly to the author of this post. 'Observe more, react less' is indeed a useful mantra to maintain some objectivity in a busy professional life.
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Overwhelmed? 10 ways to feel less busy

Overwhelmed? 10 ways to feel less busy | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
You can’t do it all, so try Oliver Burkeman’s tips to reclaim your time and your sanity
Allan Shaw's insight:
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
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Library Staff's curator insight, March 14, 7:48 PM
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 7:35 AM
"And yet it’s been obvious for a while now that the busyness epidemic isn’t what it seems. Data reliably shows we have more leisure time than in the past, not less....Last year, a survey of thousands of adults in 28 countries found that most of us don’t believe how busy others claim to be, and that we frequently feel pressured to exaggerate our own busyness: we perform being overwhelmed, scared we’ll seem like slackers if we don’t – and soon we’ve convinced ourselves, too. All of which isn’t to say that the epidemic is imaginary – we really do feel too busy, after all – but that the real problem is the feeling, not the sheer number of things on our plates."
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The four building blocks of change | McKinsey & Company

The four building blocks of change | McKinsey & Company | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Four key actions influence employee mind-sets and behavior. Here’s why they matter.
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The #1 Factor That Determines A Toxic or Thriving School Culture

The #1 Factor That Determines A Toxic or Thriving School Culture | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
When it comes to the success of an individual classroom, nothing is more important than the relationship between the teacher and the students. When it comes to the success of an entire school, nothing is more important than the relationship of the adults in the building.
Allan Shaw's insight:
Sensible advice in dealing with conflict - mostly common sense but it is often best to state the obvious over and over again.
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To Find Success, Psychologists Recommend More Listening & Connecting | #EmotionalIntelligence #EQ 

To Find Success, Psychologists Recommend More  Listening  & Connecting | #EmotionalIntelligence #EQ  | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence is a people skill that is not only necessary but powerful when it comes to connecting and engaging with others.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=EQ

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:
Emotional intelligence is a skill set. It can be developed through attention and practice. In doing so, you set yourself and others up for greater success in your joint endeavours, be they work projects, family life or as a teacher the learning of the students you work with each day.
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 21, 9:08 PM

This work also supports the Conversational Intelligence work of Judith Glaser, known as C-IQ, or #CIQ.  A reference on Judith's work is here:  

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The Deficit Model Is Harming Your Students

The Deficit Model Is Harming Your Students | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Believe That Your Students Can Learn

Students know their shortcomings, and so many -- especially minority males -- act up, act out, or drop out to rebel against the prevailing, unsubstantiated notion that all one has to do is work harder."

Allan Shaw's insight:
Convince Your Students That High Expectations Are Attainable 
- Create Reachable, Intermediate Acceleration Goals With Your Students
- Help Your Students Mitigate Their Fear of Failure
- Use Data to Foster Short-Term Wins
- Scaffold Instruction and Goals
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5 Tips on Being an Inspiring Leader

5 Tips on Being an Inspiring Leader | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Regardless of your confidence and drive, without a handful of traits it's hard to get people to follow you.
Allan Shaw's insight:
While this list of leadership traits comes initially from a world different to schools, the traits are nonetheless entirely appropriate for school leaders. Thanks to my good friend Phillip heath for passing this post to me.
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SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING: EQUIPPING STUDENTS FOR THE DIGITAL ECONOMY

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING: EQUIPPING STUDENTS FOR THE DIGITAL ECONOMY | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
In the report ‘New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning through Technology', the World Economic Forum explores how "character qualities" such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking will equip students to succeed in the swiftly evolving digital economy.

To thrive in the 21st century, students need more than traditional academic learning. They must be adept at collaboration, communication and problem-solving, which are some of the skills developed through social and emotional learning (SEL).

In 2015, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published the report New Vision for Education: Unlocking the Potential of Technology that focused on the pressing issue of the 21st-century skills gap and ways to address it through technology. In that report, WEF defined a set of 16 crucial proficiencies for education. Of those skills, 10 were labelled either “competencies” or “character qualities”. Competencies are the means by which students approach complex challenges; they include collaboration, communication and critical thinking and problem-solving. Character qualities are the ways in which students approach their changing environment; they include curiosity, adaptability and social and cultural awareness.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/a-holistic-view-of-what-will-influence-education-in-the-future/

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:
It is interesting that 10 of the 16 skills listed in this report as required to thrive in the digital economy of the 21st century are 'soft' or 'people' skills.
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 8, 7:39 AM
In the report ‘New Vision for Education: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning through Technology', the World Economic Forum explores how "character qualities" such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking will equip students to succeed in the swiftly evolving digital economy.

To thrive in the 21st century, students need more than traditional academic learning. They must be adept at collaboration, communication and problem-solving, which are some of the skills developed through social and emotional learning (SEL).

In 2015, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published the report New Vision for Education: Unlocking the Potential of Technology that focused on the pressing issue of the 21st-century skills gap and ways to address it through technology. In that report, WEF defined a set of 16 crucial proficiencies for education. Of those skills, 10 were labelled either “competencies” or “character qualities”. Competencies are the means by which students approach complex challenges; they include collaboration, communication and critical thinking and problem-solving. Character qualities are the ways in which students approach their changing environment; they include curiosity, adaptability and social and cultural awareness.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/05/19/a-holistic-view-of-what-will-influence-education-in-the-future/

 

 

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Infographic: Teaching handwriting in schools

The 2015 WISE (World Innovation Summit for Education) survey asked global education experts – including teachers and academics – about the skills that should be taught in schools.
Allan Shaw's insight:
Recently I have found that my mostly intuitive and practical separation of typing and handwriting for personal use may have some basis to it. Mueller and Oppenheimer (2014) have found in three studies that laptops, when used for taking notes by US college students, lead to shallower mental processing than with notes taken in handwriting, and performance on conceptual questions was also lower than for students who took handwritten notes. Their research showed that taking more notes can be beneficial but using a keyboard led to a tendency to transcribe the lecturer’s words verbatim rather than undertaking the processing and reframing of the words in the student’s own writing that the relative slow speed of handwriting notes requires.
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Top 10 List to Improve Your Child's Memory

Brain imaging shows what you can do with your child to boost memory for test study. Check out the top ten tips to cut your child's study time, increase test success, and let you avoid the unpleasant, high-drama of test time.
Allan Shaw's insight:
If you have not seen these ten memory hints then follow the links. They are worthy of practice as they work.
Destress
Grab attention
Colour
Novelty
Personal meaning
Relational memories
Patterning
Mental manipulation for long-term memory
Practice makes permanent
Syn-naps

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13 Habits of Phenomenally Successful Leaders

13 Habits of Phenomenally Successful Leaders | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Great culture is the extent that people are motivated and supported to do great work.
Allan Shaw's insight:
These are powerful traits to develop - not easy but useful. A summary might be that your aim is to make your yourself redundant, to develop a team and culture of operation that runs successfully without you.
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How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic | McKinsey & Company

How small shifts in leadership can transform your team dynamic | McKinsey & Company | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Simple tweaks in communication and role-modeling based on the latest behavioral research can nudge employees into top form and create a more productive environment for everyone.
Allan Shaw's insight:
The suggestions in this post are well worth reading, reflection and trialing. They may seem to use too much time but are likely to produce worthy cultural shifts.
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We’re Trying To Do “The Wrong Thing Right” in Schools — Medium

We’re Trying To Do “The Wrong Thing Right” in Schools — Medium | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Whenever I think about the way most schools are structured today, I always come back to the same question: Do we do the …
Allan Shaw's insight:
This is an interesting post with much good thinking. Success lies in the balance between efficiency and effectiveness, the balance between learning and teaching. I would add feedback into the mix to create three key components but perhaps that is for another day. The balance in a strong education between efficiency and effectiveness needs to be re-calibrated more towards effectiveness. The dilemma for me is where does the new balance lay but more importantly how do we move that way and at the same time advantage the children in our care.
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Katja Rieger's curator insight, March 18, 4:31 AM
Are schools about teaching or about learning. Making schools more efficient may limit their effectiveness. Most of us know how the ideal school environment looks like, we just don't know how to achieve it with limited funds 
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Why I'm Tired of 'Grit'

The K-12 infatuation with "grit" offers an impractical and unfair model for education, writes educator James R. Delisle.
Allan Shaw's insight:
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
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Library Staff's curator insight, March 14, 8:19 PM
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 15, 7:35 AM
'Success' is complex. 'Success' in learning is no different. A tendency to simplistic explanations is not healthy in education. This post outlines why the simplistic use of 'grit' is limited. In doing so, the post runs the risk of using concepts of relative ability, genetics, and context in a simplistic manner. All of the above influence 'success'. The athletics concept of a 'personal best' allows for the complex interplay of these factors.
Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 11:57 AM
Food for thought. . . 
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Parental Reasoning And Wellbeing | The Knox School

Parental Reasoning And Wellbeing | The Knox School | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
‘When parents are asked about what determines their satisfaction with their children’s school, top of the list is their children’s welfare, that is, whether their children are happy and safe. This accords with a global study conducted last year for Fisher-Price(1), which found a shift in mothers’ aspirations for their children: today’s parents, first and foremost, want their children to be happy.’
Allan Shaw's insight:
The top factors that have emerged from our survey of parents conducted in term 4 2015 show clearly why they choose The Knox School. They are

1. Quality of teaching (95%)
2. Focus on student wellbeing (92%)
3. Balanced education (88%)
4. Quality education at reasonable expense (88%)
5. The school’s values (88%)

Parents value the development of their children’s emotional intelligence, including their capacity for resilience and the ability to communicate and collaborate.

The Knox School has developed a strong and positive student culture where student’s emotional intelligence comes to the fore. We have data to support this view. In 2015, Middle School students’ data was gathered by independent third party professionals that showed that Knox Middle School students had exceptionally positive levels of resilience, mental health and well-being, hope and optimism.
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