Leadership in edu...
Follow
Find
2.8K views | +8 today
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
onto Leadership in education
Scoop.it!

The 10 Skills Modern Teachers Must Have

The 10 Skills Modern Teachers Must Have | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
In order to implement modern technology in your classroom, you better know about the important skills modern teachers must have in order to succeed.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Allan Shaw's insight:

It is worthy of note that this list is comprised predominantly of affective attitudes and skills, that is, how a teacher handles themselves and their relationships. technology amplifies human behaviours; those behaviours need to be professional, sustainable and relational.

more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 13, 2013 11:13 AM

There’s been a lot of talk about 21st century learners, 21st century teachers, and connected classrooms. There’s a daily influx of new technology into your inbox and your classroom feels woefully behind the times even if you’re flipping your 1:1 iPad classroom that’s already online and part of a MOOC. What are modern teachers to do with all this jargon and techno-babble being thrown at them all day long?

Simple. Take a step back. Breathe. And pick out just a small number of things you want to try in your classroom. Whether you’re itching to try a BYOD classroom or simply integrating a HyFlex model, it’s easy to take one digital step at a time, right? No need to try and revolutionize your classroom in one afternoon. That’s a recipe for failure.

In my experience, I’ve seen teachers attempt to integrate 30 iPads into their classroom by handing them out and then trying to figure out which apps are worth using. Integrating something as powerful as the iPad takes months of preparation, professional development, and buy-in by the students. If they just think ‘hey a way for me to play Angry Birds during class!’ then you have a steep hill to climb. So that’s why I’d encourage you, the modern teacher, to tackle each modern method one at a time.

Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 2013 1:41 PM

 

Check also:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

Leadership in education
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
more...
Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be

21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be
Allan Shaw's insight:

This shift looks very attractive at first glance. I expect that movement in this direction will be less clear cut than that implied by this visual representation. Discussions with young adults especially recent graduates in the workforce would suggest this shift has started.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from Transformational Teaching, Thinking, and Technology
Scoop.it!

The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom

The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"We’re not all that far along in understanding how learning, teaching, and technology interact in the classroom. Institutions should certainly enable faculty to experiment with new technology, but should also approach all potential classroom intruders with a healthy dose of skepticism, and resist the impulse to always implement the new, trendy thing out of our fear of being left behind."


Via Chris Carter
Allan Shaw's insight:

The key to the use of any technology, laptop or pen and paper to name two, is a focus on the nature, quality and quantity of the learning. That focus should make clear what is to be learned and then judge how well it has been learned. Any uses of technologies should support the learning goals.

more...
Chris Carter's curator insight, June 6, 9:59 PM

The other voice. Ban computers so that our boring lectures cannot be as easily or as obviously ignored. Force kids to once again daydream rather than do something as shockingly dull as pay attention to our prattling on about things of which the kids are not interested. And they will daydream, doodle, or drool. Why? Because we cannot capture their imaginations nor challenge their intellects with droning lectures. BTW, ban laptops and surreptitious smart phones will find their way into young hands.

Let's not challenge ourselves to use the power of the tools available. That would be too burdensome. Rather, let us continue to do what we have always done. It gives us a feeling of satisfaction, and it is easier to repeat ourselves than to demonstrate the skill of lifelong learning. I suppose that task should be left for others to do. Sheeeesh!

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, June 13, 5:18 PM

Them's fighting words! Actually, a balanced view.

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

10 Things Young Leaders Need to Succeed

10 Things Young Leaders Need to Succeed | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Success of young leaders is the future of organizations. Old leaders, who cling to leadership, limit their legacy. Act like you’ll be gone next year. Rigor: Call for commitment. The image below...
Allan Shaw's insight:

Older leaders could use these too!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from Kenya School Report - 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic

5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
We’re all used to the term ‘21st century’ popping up in education articles, social media, and even in school staff rooms. It’s become normal to refer to yourself as a 21st century teacher, teaching in a 21st century classroom, using 21st century teaching methods that are centered on your 21st century students. While this popular …

Via Abraham Tumuti
Allan Shaw's insight:

Oh so true! Great read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

What the SAMR model really means (to me)

What the SAMR model really means (to me) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Just because we have the best hammer does not mean that every problem is a nail." Barack Obama ...

Allan Shaw's insight:

Key words -

"However,  I probably differ from most people who refer to Puentedura when I point out that his model also helps us understand when not to use technology.

In my view, we should continue to see the SAMR model as a very valuable framework that allows teachers to understand the true value of technology integration, which is the design and development of new ways to teach and learn that were “previously inconceivable”.

Using digital technology merely as a functional substitute for something that clearly does not require its use only helps to fuel the claims of those opposed to the use of technology in schools that technology does not add value to learning. So, I encourage you to take a second look at SAMR and think like no-one has thought before."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

The New Principal on the Block

The New Principal on the Block | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Joanne Rooney, former codirector of the Midwest Principals’ Center and a mentor for principals, shares insights from her article, “For Principals: Planning the First Year,” in the Summer 2013 digital-only issue of Educational Leadership. Are you a principal who’ll lead a school new to you this September? Here are actions you can take. Remember, YOU are the new kid on the block. Earning trust is your first order of business. Establish relationships. Get to know and show respect for teachers—their lives, their hopes and fears. Share your stories so you are seen as human as well as the principal. Extend yourself to bus drivers, lunch room staff, and custodians. The village it takes to raise a child consists of all its citizens. Learn the culture. Tread lightly on your new turf. Honor established customs, rituals, and practices. Consult teachers. Ask as many teachers as you can two key questions: “What should we absolutely keep in this school?” and “What might we improve?” Don’t change everything. Sacred cows are hidden everywhere. Dishonoring an established custom can be a major setback for the new principal. Pick your battles carefully. Distinguish those that directly affect the welfare of kids from minor skirmishes. Delegate. Unless you want a 70-hour week, give responsibilities to others where possible. However, “the buck stops here” applies. Plan to stay. Using the principalship as a way to increase your monthly paychecks or as a stepping stone to “climb the ladder” is a breach of trust to those you serve as leader. If these things happen, they should be a result of sterling leadership—not a planned strategy. Establish relationships. . . . Or, did I say this already?
Allan Shaw's insight:

To be honest much of this applies whether you are new or not!

more...
NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, June 5, 1:22 PM

This is a MUST READ for new principals! 

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Become the Leader Others Value

10 Ways to Become the Leader Others Value | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

It’s not "just" business. We are born to connect. The greatest "ship" in leadership is relationship.

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Leaders either drive results through power and authority or relationship. Both have their place.

'Nothing is more important than building relationships – that drive results – with current and future leaders'

Every aspect of leadership is made better in the presence of strong connection."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from Transformational Teaching, Thinking, and Technology
Scoop.it!

Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain

Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
At some point, every parent wishes their high school aged student would go to bed earlier as well as find time to pursue their own passions -- or maybe even choose to relax. This thought reemerged as

Via Chris Carter
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is well worth reading! We have been doing some work in this area with senior students and the school's senior psychologist. A healthy balanced life style of enough sleep and regular sleep routines, regular exercise, positive peer friendships and a good focus on blocks of study without social media distractions is a good formula for success in all areas. The notion of successful multitasking is a strong misconception amongst students. On the whole they do not know of the resultant diminished/less efficient learning.

more...
Kathy Lynch's curator insight, May 28, 11:24 PM

Good Info, Thx Chris

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, May 29, 3:13 PM

This is a constant debate. Why is it so tough to make the choices that will benefit kids?

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, May 29, 9:21 PM

Thx Chris Carter

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Teaching Content in a Google World

Teaching Content in a Google World | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
I don't know anyone who can successfully teach 'content-free'. We need to ensure that we teach good content: relevant, current, useful, interesting. We need to teach that content well, using effect...
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is an excellent post from a strong teacher. Stephen Taylor seems to have an appropriate balance in his approach across many areas. Whilst at differing stages of our careers, the approach outlined is the closest to mine that I have come across.

more...
Deborah Welsh's curator insight, May 25, 6:24 PM

Content and skills can be balanced in teaching, as long as we don't sail along blissfully ignoring one in favour of the other. We do need to think beyond that which is "googleable" .

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, May 25, 6:30 PM

Content and skills can be balanced in teaching, as long as we don't sail along blissfully ignoring one in favour of the other. We do need to think beyond that which is "googleable" .

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Beyond Principals: Leadership Assessment Tools for All Educators

Beyond Principals: Leadership Assessment Tools for All Educators | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Two education college professors from The University of Wisconsin-Madison and a consultant from the Wisconsin Center for Educational Products and Services have developed a survey-based system that calculates areas of strengths and weaknesses in schools, and creates an action plan for improvement. The Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning, or CALL, does not single any particular educators but rather takes a snapshot of what is happening as a whole entity. It is a smart assessment tool to implement at the end of the year and then brainstorm actionable steps on improvement when school is back in session.
Allan Shaw's insight:

I have no personal knowledge of this product but like the concept that all educators need to be involved in leadership, individually in what they do and how they act but also collectively. No one person can improve the education of all students in a school. All have to be involved and the greater the synergy, the more effective the systems, the greater the development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Trying Not to Try: How to Cultivate the Paradoxical Art of Spontaneity Through the Chinese Concept of Wu-Wei

Trying Not to Try: How to Cultivate the Paradoxical Art of Spontaneity Through the Chinese Concept of Wu-Wei | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“Our modern conception of human excellence is too often impoverished, cold, and bloodless. Success does not always come from thinking more rigorously or striving harder.”

Allan Shaw's insight:

Read on as this is fascinating.

'Two ancient Chinese concepts might be our most powerful tools for resolving this paradox — wu-wei (pronounced oooo-way) and de (pronounced duh). Slingerland explains:

"Wu-wei literally translates as “no trying” or “no doing,” but it’s not at all about dull inaction. In fact, it refers to the dynamic, effortless, and unselfconscious state of mind of a person who is optimally active and effective. People in wu-wei feel as if they are doing nothing, while at the same time they might be creating a brilliant work of art, smoothly negotiating a complex social situation, or even bringing the entire world into harmonious order. For a person in wu-wei, proper and effective conduct follows as automatically as the body gives in to the seductive rhythm of a song. This state of harmony is both complex and holistic, involving as it does the integration of the body, the emotions, and the mind. If we have to translate it, wu-wei is probably best rendered as something like “effortless action” or “spontaneous action.” Being in wu-wei is relaxing and enjoyable, but in a deeply rewarding way that distinguishes it from cruder or more mundane pleasures."'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Applying Constructivist Leadership in the School Setting

Applying Constructivist Leadership in the School Setting | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"The reciprocal process that enables us to construct meaning usually occurs within the context of relationships. Therefore, creation and expansion of the possibilities and capacities for relation only occur in communities that are rich in relationships. There is  a need for school leaders to stop thinking of people as separate entities, but rather in terms of interconnected relationships."

Allan Shaw's insight:

'A study by Claremont Graduate Schools’ Institute for Education in Transformation identified the most important factor in schools: relationships. The study was carried out by teachers, and conducted as a series of dialogues. The participants, parents, students, teachers, administrators, and support staff, pointed out a lack of authentic relationships in which they were trusted, given responsibility, regarded with warmth and honesty, and treated with dignity and respect.'

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

When I first read these ideas for learning through humility, I thought these would be tough to implement well, but not so difficult if you are also working on being a good listener at the same time. Given, I have just started a new position, being a good listener and observer is critical to success.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, Today, 9:39 AM

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning.


Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, Today, 10:40 AM

Humility is an interesting starting point for teaching, as well.

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Students who used longhand remembered more and had a deeper understanding of the material
Allan Shaw's insight:

The same research as I have mentioned earlier but presented in a little more detail and in a format that is more useful for an educator's context.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Does Losing Handwriting In School Mean Losing Other Skills Too?

Does Losing Handwriting In School Mean Losing Other Skills Too? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Learning to write by hand has learning benefits that could be neglected if too much focus is put on keyboarding.

Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

It is becoming clearer that it is important that we do not lose  handwriting as a skill! Strong positive neural development in a child is far more important than adeptness in using digital technologies. If research continues to support these initial studies many educators will need to reflect and possibly readjust.

more...
Vanesa Juarez's curator insight, June 9, 8:48 AM

No és una crítica a les noves tecnologies, però hi ha coses que potser s'haurien de continuar aprenent com abans: "Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information."

ChristopherBell's curator insight, June 12, 8:30 PM

This is an ongoing discussion between my English Teacher friend and I.  I think the real question is why are we still teaching keyboarding??

Sharla Shults's curator insight, June 16, 2:57 PM

New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep. Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.

Rescooped by Allan Shaw from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

» 10 Tips for Good Cross-Cultural Communications Intercultural Talk: Stereotypes in Advertising, Intercultural Communications, Multicultural Parenting

» 10 Tips for Good Cross-Cultural Communications Intercultural Talk: Stereotypes in Advertising, Intercultural Communications, Multicultural Parenting | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Engaging and delighting in cultural difference

 

Remember the old adage ‘the best way to remember your story is to tell the truth?’  Well, it’s the same with Intercultural Communications.  The best way to interact with others is to be keenly aware of yourself…but also hyper sensitive and receptive to the individuality and autonomous experience of others around you.

 
Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

These are good points to use in cross cultural understandings but also in dealing with all people.

more...
Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, June 9, 1:40 AM

 Be open to learning, and learn to teach without being judgmental or making the learner feel embarrassed.  Remember Emerson (sic) Everyone is my master because I can learn something from everyone.

Empowerment's curator insight, June 10, 10:10 AM

Encore une fois, la clé de la relation repose sur l'écoute et le confort avec ce que l'on est soit même ... 

ANA's curator insight, June 10, 12:01 PM

Comunicación intercultural

Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
"Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric."

British philosopher, mathematician, historia
Allan Shaw's insight:

These points are mostly about honesty, confidence and integrity, although they could be improved by adding that admitting you were wrong when so is an excellent trait to model.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger

Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'Success destroys leaders by encouraging them to repeat the past. Leadership is always about the future. Repetition: Repeating the past prevents you from building on it. Success confirms and solidifies, then it destroys.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

An interesting post in relation to school leadership where repeating past success is often seen as exactly what should be done! There is some truth in saying that children and young adults in schools need continuity and consistency for their successful development. Yet there is also truth in saying that we should:

- examine success as much as we examine failure and check for its continued usefulness.

- providing consistency and continuity is not the same as 'drifting'

- do not assume that repeating the past will create the future most appropriate for children and young adults.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

7 Marks of Engaging Language

7 Marks of Engaging Language | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

There are no casual words, when it comes to leadership. Every word delivers results. Determine desired results before opening your mouth. Words:

Build or destroy.

Energize or anesthetize.

Push forward or hold back...

Allan Shaw's insight:

4 ways to evaluate leader-talk:

Only others can tell you what you said.

What did you hear me saying?

What was confusing?

How did I make you feel as I was talking?

What do you want to do, now that I’m done talking?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Learning first, technology second

Learning first, technology second | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"'Pedagogy is the driver, technology is the accelerator' - Michael Fullan"

Allan Shaw's insight:

"If you forget everything else, remember this: Don't let technology get in the way of good teaching and learning. If you believe technology can be used to engage students, to enhance or extend learning, or to enrich the life of your community of practice, then go for it. However, if you can't see any way technology can do any of these things, then close the catalogue. Leave the store. Walk away. There is nothing for you to see here."

Thus it is important not to buy poorly designed software; make sure it is intuitively simple to use and achieves your learning goals; don't buy hardware because it is trendy or new but because it fulfills a learning need.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Educator as a Design Thinker

Educator as a Design Thinker | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
   Resources for Educator as a Design Thinker Ideo. (n.d.).  Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit - Pfau, P. (2014).  Rethinking Education with Design Thinking - Speicher, S. (2013).  Design Think...

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Jackie+GERSTEIN

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

As a former Visual Arts and Design and Technology teacher, this resonates well. There is much for classroom teachers from diverse backgrounds using design thinking to progress their teaching and student's learning. There are many versions of the parts to design thinking but this will suffice today:

- Identify the problem/issue
- Develop possible solutions
- Test these solutions
- Welcome and learn from failure and success

more...
Enrique Robles's curator insight, May 30, 11:54 AM

This is article is interesting.

NOTRE DAME SCHOOL's curator insight, May 31, 9:13 AM

Visualize your thinking and reach a bigger audience!

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, May 31, 11:32 AM

perfeita combinação: educadores como desenhistas de pensamento (designers thinkers).


Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

5 Things Smart Leaders Never Say

5 Things Smart Leaders Never Say | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Only fools say dumb things, intentionally. Think back to the last dumb thing you said. Did you think it was dumb, before you said it? The dumb things you've said seemed smart at first. 5 things sma...
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post has much written from a negative stance but also contains a real gem. It follows:

7 smart behaviors of successful leaders:Listen. Be dumb courageously.Build relationships.Develop yourself and others.Talk mission and vision.Build strong teams.Challenge people.Fuel urgency.

 

Good positive behaviours, although do not overdo the last one!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Allan Shaw from Educational Books and Scholarly Articles
Scoop.it!

5 tips for teaching 'grit' in the classroom

5 tips for teaching 'grit' in the classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“Despite debate over whether perseverance can actually be taught, these tactics can help foster an atmosphere of critical thinking in the classroom.”


Via ICTPHMS
Allan Shaw's insight:

Like others for whom I have much respect, I prefer the term 'resilience' to 'grit' but that is a minor matter.

 

There is much to reflect upon and use in this post that is positive and while the debate on whether resilience  can be taught explicitly will continue, there is no doubt that the school culture and climate can contribute much towards acknowledging and cultivating resilience.

 

Schools are places where the quality of relationships is critical and thus resilience can be cultivated, but I do not agree with the statement "..when students do demonstrate perseverance, do not tell them good job." That is a simplistic comment. Children and young adults, like older adults, need positive reinforcement and encouragement. All humans need acknowledgement of a good well done and we all wish to develop a positive student culture and climate in a school. We do not want students doing something just for the acknowledgement, but being relational creatures, communication and positive acknowledgement assist in our development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

David Foster Wallace on Leadership, Illustrated and Read by Debbie Millman

David Foster Wallace on Leadership, Illustrated and Read by Debbie Millman | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“A leader’s real ‘authority’ is a power you voluntarily give him, and you grant him this authority not with resentment or resignation but happily.” (Please excuse the gender specific pronouns.)

Allan Shaw's insight:

'Obviously, a real leader isn’t just somebody who has ideas you agree with, nor is it just somebody you happen to believe is a good guy. Think about it. A real leader is somebody who, because of his own particular power and charisma and example, is able to inspire people, with “inspire” being used here in a serious and non-cliché way. A real leader can somehow get us to do certain things that deep down we think are good and want to be able to do but usually can’t get ourselves to do on our own. It’s a mysterious quality, hard to define, but we always know it when we see it, even as kids'

 

(Please excuse the gender specific pronouns.)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Allan Shaw
Scoop.it!

Are You Teaching Content Or Teaching Thought? -

Are You Teaching Content Or Teaching Thought? - | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Are You Teaching Content, Or Teaching Thought? by Terry Heick Thinking is troublesome. For one, it is an intimate act splicing time and space. It is done right here, but it spans moments in the pasts...
Allan Shaw's insight:

While this piece could be said to provide a false dichotomy, the underlying consideration that we, as professionals, are not clear about our goals, is worthy of reflection.

more...
No comment yet.