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We don’t need no educator : The role of the teacher in today’s online education

We don’t need no educator : The role of the teacher in today’s online education | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational design, and related subjects

Via juandoming, Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

While the video is not great quality the audio has excellent content and the slides support well. The medium may be average but the message is worth the effort.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:27 AM

A MUST read and watching the video from conference also...

 

Leadership in education
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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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Cutting Edge-ucation: Assigning Optional Homework?

Cutting Edge-ucation: Assigning Optional Homework? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Allan Shaw's insight:

"As teachers we have the choice to calculate homework into a grade or not.  Most teachers I know have homework as a small percentage of a students overall performance, yet many of the report card conversations between teachers, parents and students, from my experience and as shared with by many other teachers, revolve around the topic of missing or late homework.  Now I don't believe that something should be changed to avoid a conversation, but these conversations can often become distractors or points of contention between parent and student, student and teacher and teacher and parent, thus creating problems in partnerships that are vital to real learning. These homework conversations are another draw away from the important conversation about learning, true student needs and areas of growth."

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(INFOGRAPHIC) Mindfulness Meditation - Prevention - Depression

(INFOGRAPHIC) Mindfulness Meditation - Prevention - Depression | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Research continues to emerge linking mindfulness based meditation to better physical and mental health. Here are the many reasons you should start living in the...
Allan Shaw's insight:

As one who has meditated for the last 25 years, I can recommend its beneficial effects. I hope I have also become a little 'wiser' with age anyway. My experience suggests meditating regularly, not looking for positive effects and not being judgmental in terms of 'cost/benefit', is prudent.

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21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be

21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
21st Century Work: Career-Readiness Isn't What It Used To Be
Allan Shaw's insight:

This shift looks very attractive at first glance. I expect that movement in this direction will be less clear cut than that implied by this visual representation. Discussions with young adults especially recent graduates in the workforce would suggest this shift has started.

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The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom

The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"We’re not all that far along in understanding how learning, teaching, and technology interact in the classroom. Institutions should certainly enable faculty to experiment with new technology, but should also approach all potential classroom intruders with a healthy dose of skepticism, and resist the impulse to always implement the new, trendy thing out of our fear of being left behind."


Via Chris Carter
Allan Shaw's insight:

The key to the use of any technology, laptop or pen and paper to name two, is a focus on the nature, quality and quantity of the learning. That focus should make clear what is to be learned and then judge how well it has been learned. Any uses of technologies should support the learning goals.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 6, 9:59 PM

The other voice. Ban computers so that our boring lectures cannot be as easily or as obviously ignored. Force kids to once again daydream rather than do something as shockingly dull as pay attention to our prattling on about things of which the kids are not interested. And they will daydream, doodle, or drool. Why? Because we cannot capture their imaginations nor challenge their intellects with droning lectures. BTW, ban laptops and surreptitious smart phones will find their way into young hands.

Let's not challenge ourselves to use the power of the tools available. That would be too burdensome. Rather, let us continue to do what we have always done. It gives us a feeling of satisfaction, and it is easier to repeat ourselves than to demonstrate the skill of lifelong learning. I suppose that task should be left for others to do. Sheeeesh!

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, June 13, 5:18 PM

Them's fighting words! Actually, a balanced view.

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10 Things Young Leaders Need to Succeed

10 Things Young Leaders Need to Succeed | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Success of young leaders is the future of organizations. Old leaders, who cling to leadership, limit their legacy. Act like you’ll be gone next year. Rigor: Call for commitment. The image below...
Allan Shaw's insight:

Older leaders could use these too!

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5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic

5 Important Things To Teach Students About The Brain - Edudemic | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
We’re all used to the term ‘21st century’ popping up in education articles, social media, and even in school staff rooms. It’s become normal to refer to yourself as a 21st century teacher, teaching in a 21st century classroom, using 21st century teaching methods that are centered on your 21st century students. While this popular …

Via Abraham Tumuti
Allan Shaw's insight:

Oh so true! Great read.

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What the SAMR model really means (to me)

What the SAMR model really means (to me) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Just because we have the best hammer does not mean that every problem is a nail." Barack Obama ...

Allan Shaw's insight:

Key words -

"However,  I probably differ from most people who refer to Puentedura when I point out that his model also helps us understand when not to use technology.

In my view, we should continue to see the SAMR model as a very valuable framework that allows teachers to understand the true value of technology integration, which is the design and development of new ways to teach and learn that were “previously inconceivable”.

Using digital technology merely as a functional substitute for something that clearly does not require its use only helps to fuel the claims of those opposed to the use of technology in schools that technology does not add value to learning. So, I encourage you to take a second look at SAMR and think like no-one has thought before."

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The New Principal on the Block

The New Principal on the Block | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Joanne Rooney, former codirector of the Midwest Principals’ Center and a mentor for principals, shares insights from her article, “For Principals: Planning the First Year,” in the Summer 2013 digital-only issue of Educational Leadership. Are you a principal who’ll lead a school new to you this September? Here are actions you can take. Remember, YOU are the new kid on the block. Earning trust is your first order of business. Establish relationships. Get to know and show respect for teachers—their lives, their hopes and fears. Share your stories so you are seen as human as well as the principal. Extend yourself to bus drivers, lunch room staff, and custodians. The village it takes to raise a child consists of all its citizens. Learn the culture. Tread lightly on your new turf. Honor established customs, rituals, and practices. Consult teachers. Ask as many teachers as you can two key questions: “What should we absolutely keep in this school?” and “What might we improve?” Don’t change everything. Sacred cows are hidden everywhere. Dishonoring an established custom can be a major setback for the new principal. Pick your battles carefully. Distinguish those that directly affect the welfare of kids from minor skirmishes. Delegate. Unless you want a 70-hour week, give responsibilities to others where possible. However, “the buck stops here” applies. Plan to stay. Using the principalship as a way to increase your monthly paychecks or as a stepping stone to “climb the ladder” is a breach of trust to those you serve as leader. If these things happen, they should be a result of sterling leadership—not a planned strategy. Establish relationships. . . . Or, did I say this already?
Allan Shaw's insight:

To be honest much of this applies whether you are new or not!

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NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, June 5, 1:22 PM

This is a MUST READ for new principals! 

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10 Ways to Become the Leader Others Value

10 Ways to Become the Leader Others Value | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

It’s not "just" business. We are born to connect. The greatest "ship" in leadership is relationship.

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Leaders either drive results through power and authority or relationship. Both have their place.

'Nothing is more important than building relationships – that drive results – with current and future leaders'

Every aspect of leadership is made better in the presence of strong connection."

 

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Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain

Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
At some point, every parent wishes their high school aged student would go to bed earlier as well as find time to pursue their own passions -- or maybe even choose to relax. This thought reemerged as

Via Chris Carter
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is well worth reading! We have been doing some work in this area with senior students and the school's senior psychologist. A healthy balanced life style of enough sleep and regular sleep routines, regular exercise, positive peer friendships and a good focus on blocks of study without social media distractions is a good formula for success in all areas. The notion of successful multitasking is a strong misconception amongst students. On the whole they do not know of the resultant diminished/less efficient learning.

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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, May 28, 11:24 PM

Good Info, Thx Chris

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, May 29, 3:13 PM

This is a constant debate. Why is it so tough to make the choices that will benefit kids?

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, May 29, 9:21 PM

Thx Chris Carter

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Teaching Content in a Google World

Teaching Content in a Google World | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
I don't know anyone who can successfully teach 'content-free'. We need to ensure that we teach good content: relevant, current, useful, interesting. We need to teach that content well, using effect...
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is an excellent post from a strong teacher. Stephen Taylor seems to have an appropriate balance in his approach across many areas. Whilst at differing stages of our careers, the approach outlined is the closest to mine that I have come across.

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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, May 25, 6:24 PM

Content and skills can be balanced in teaching, as long as we don't sail along blissfully ignoring one in favour of the other. We do need to think beyond that which is "googleable" .

Deborah Welsh's curator insight, May 25, 6:30 PM

Content and skills can be balanced in teaching, as long as we don't sail along blissfully ignoring one in favour of the other. We do need to think beyond that which is "googleable" .

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Beyond Principals: Leadership Assessment Tools for All Educators

Beyond Principals: Leadership Assessment Tools for All Educators | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Two education college professors from The University of Wisconsin-Madison and a consultant from the Wisconsin Center for Educational Products and Services have developed a survey-based system that calculates areas of strengths and weaknesses in schools, and creates an action plan for improvement. The Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning, or CALL, does not single any particular educators but rather takes a snapshot of what is happening as a whole entity. It is a smart assessment tool to implement at the end of the year and then brainstorm actionable steps on improvement when school is back in session.
Allan Shaw's insight:

I have no personal knowledge of this product but like the concept that all educators need to be involved in leadership, individually in what they do and how they act but also collectively. No one person can improve the education of all students in a school. All have to be involved and the greater the synergy, the more effective the systems, the greater the development.

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7 Power Tips for Facing Turbulence

7 Power Tips for Facing Turbulence | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

Turbulence grabs attention, focuses energy, stretches relationships, tests resolve, and shows you who you are. Leadership tips during turbulence. ..

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Turbulence is useful when it:

Strengthens connections. People who trust each other pull together during tough times; people who don’t, pull apart.Disrupts stagnant patterns.Challenges old ways of thinking and invites creativity and innovation.Drives self-reflection, rather than blame and irresponsibility.Motivates outward focus. Turning inward without turning outward is organizational suicide. Don’t hunker down and ride it out.Purifies mission. Is it time to get back to basics?Provides an enemy. Defeating enemies energizes armies."
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4 Ways Leaders Can Create a Candid Culture

4 Ways Leaders Can Create a Candid Culture | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Sometimes you need to go beyond listening.
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is an excellent post and well worth the effort of reading and reflecting upon the contents. Listening is a good start and the additional three points made in this post build of being open to the views of others. Raising topics that are known to be contentious, teaching the skills of speaking candidly and listening well and finally and possibly most importantly, letting go of ego in discussions. The last is often easy to say and much harder to do! As a colleague has said to me, 'being open to our own frailties is the right challenge'.

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Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Humility Is An Interesting Starting Point For Learning

Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

When I first read these ideas for learning through humility, I thought these would be tough to implement well, but not so difficult if you are also working on being a good listener at the same time. Given, I have just started a new position, being a good listener and observer is critical to success.

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Chris Carter's comment, July 10, 11:36 AM
Humility makes sense. Socrates knew that he was ignorant, and therefor was ready to learn. If I think that I already know a thing, or do not need to know a thing, then my mind is closed to it. All learning starts from a point of ignorance, and then move to greater approximations of understanding until mastery.
Srimayee Dam's comment, July 10, 11:43 AM
Absolutely! Most are unable to do so, unwilling to learn .. Being ignorant is fine, but lack of humility won't ever help
umh1467's curator insight, July 11, 4:57 AM

Es evidente que sólo si crees que puedes aprender lo harás.

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A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop

A Learning Secret: Don’t Take Notes with a Laptop | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Students who used longhand remembered more and had a deeper understanding of the material
Allan Shaw's insight:

The same research as I have mentioned earlier but presented in a little more detail and in a format that is more useful for an educator's context.

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Does Losing Handwriting In School Mean Losing Other Skills Too?

Does Losing Handwriting In School Mean Losing Other Skills Too? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Learning to write by hand has learning benefits that could be neglected if too much focus is put on keyboarding.

Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

It is becoming clearer that it is important that we do not lose  handwriting as a skill! Strong positive neural development in a child is far more important than adeptness in using digital technologies. If research continues to support these initial studies many educators will need to reflect and possibly readjust.

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Vanesa Juarez's curator insight, June 9, 8:48 AM

No és una crítica a les noves tecnologies, però hi ha coses que potser s'haurien de continuar aprenent com abans: "Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information."

ChristopherBell's curator insight, June 12, 8:30 PM

This is an ongoing discussion between my English Teacher friend and I.  I think the real question is why are we still teaching keyboarding??

Sharla Shults's curator insight, June 16, 2:57 PM

New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep. Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.

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» 10 Tips for Good Cross-Cultural Communications Intercultural Talk: Stereotypes in Advertising, Intercultural Communications, Multicultural Parenting

» 10 Tips for Good Cross-Cultural Communications Intercultural Talk: Stereotypes in Advertising, Intercultural Communications, Multicultural Parenting | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Engaging and delighting in cultural difference

 

Remember the old adage ‘the best way to remember your story is to tell the truth?’  Well, it’s the same with Intercultural Communications.  The best way to interact with others is to be keenly aware of yourself…but also hyper sensitive and receptive to the individuality and autonomous experience of others around you.

 
Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

These are good points to use in cross cultural understandings but also in dealing with all people.

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Halina Ostańkowicz-Bazan's curator insight, June 9, 1:40 AM

 Be open to learning, and learn to teach without being judgmental or making the learner feel embarrassed.  Remember Emerson (sic) Everyone is my master because I can learn something from everyone.

Empowerment's curator insight, June 10, 10:10 AM

Encore une fois, la clé de la relation repose sur l'écoute et le confort avec ce que l'on est soit même ... 

ANA's curator insight, June 10, 12:01 PM

Comunicación intercultural

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A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Teaching | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
"Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric."

British philosopher, mathematician, historia
Allan Shaw's insight:

These points are mostly about honesty, confidence and integrity, although they could be improved by adding that admitting you were wrong when so is an excellent trait to model.

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Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger

Winning with Leadership's Greatest Danger | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'Success destroys leaders by encouraging them to repeat the past. Leadership is always about the future. Repetition: Repeating the past prevents you from building on it. Success confirms and solidifies, then it destroys.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

An interesting post in relation to school leadership where repeating past success is often seen as exactly what should be done! There is some truth in saying that children and young adults in schools need continuity and consistency for their successful development. Yet there is also truth in saying that we should:

- examine success as much as we examine failure and check for its continued usefulness.

- providing consistency and continuity is not the same as 'drifting'

- do not assume that repeating the past will create the future most appropriate for children and young adults.

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7 Marks of Engaging Language

7 Marks of Engaging Language | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

There are no casual words, when it comes to leadership. Every word delivers results. Determine desired results before opening your mouth. Words:

Build or destroy.

Energize or anesthetize.

Push forward or hold back...

Allan Shaw's insight:

4 ways to evaluate leader-talk:

Only others can tell you what you said.

What did you hear me saying?

What was confusing?

How did I make you feel as I was talking?

What do you want to do, now that I’m done talking?

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Learning first, technology second

Learning first, technology second | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"'Pedagogy is the driver, technology is the accelerator' - Michael Fullan"

Allan Shaw's insight:

"If you forget everything else, remember this: Don't let technology get in the way of good teaching and learning. If you believe technology can be used to engage students, to enhance or extend learning, or to enrich the life of your community of practice, then go for it. However, if you can't see any way technology can do any of these things, then close the catalogue. Leave the store. Walk away. There is nothing for you to see here."

Thus it is important not to buy poorly designed software; make sure it is intuitively simple to use and achieves your learning goals; don't buy hardware because it is trendy or new but because it fulfills a learning need.

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Educator as a Design Thinker

Educator as a Design Thinker | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
   Resources for Educator as a Design Thinker Ideo. (n.d.).  Design Thinking for Educators Toolkit - Pfau, P. (2014).  Rethinking Education with Design Thinking - Speicher, S. (2013).  Design Think...

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Jackie+GERSTEIN

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

As a former Visual Arts and Design and Technology teacher, this resonates well. There is much for classroom teachers from diverse backgrounds using design thinking to progress their teaching and student's learning. There are many versions of the parts to design thinking but this will suffice today:

- Identify the problem/issue
- Develop possible solutions
- Test these solutions
- Welcome and learn from failure and success

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Enrique Robles's curator insight, May 30, 11:54 AM

This is article is interesting.

NOTRE DAME SCHOOL's curator insight, May 31, 9:13 AM

Visualize your thinking and reach a bigger audience!

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, May 31, 11:32 AM

perfeita combinação: educadores como desenhistas de pensamento (designers thinkers).


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5 Things Smart Leaders Never Say

5 Things Smart Leaders Never Say | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Only fools say dumb things, intentionally. Think back to the last dumb thing you said. Did you think it was dumb, before you said it? The dumb things you've said seemed smart at first. 5 things sma...
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post has much written from a negative stance but also contains a real gem. It follows:

7 smart behaviors of successful leaders:Listen. Be dumb courageously.Build relationships.Develop yourself and others.Talk mission and vision.Build strong teams.Challenge people.Fuel urgency.

 

Good positive behaviours, although do not overdo the last one!

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5 tips for teaching 'grit' in the classroom

5 tips for teaching 'grit' in the classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

“Despite debate over whether perseverance can actually be taught, these tactics can help foster an atmosphere of critical thinking in the classroom.”


Via ICTPHMS
Allan Shaw's insight:

Like others for whom I have much respect, I prefer the term 'resilience' to 'grit' but that is a minor matter.

 

There is much to reflect upon and use in this post that is positive and while the debate on whether resilience  can be taught explicitly will continue, there is no doubt that the school culture and climate can contribute much towards acknowledging and cultivating resilience.

 

Schools are places where the quality of relationships is critical and thus resilience can be cultivated, but I do not agree with the statement "..when students do demonstrate perseverance, do not tell them good job." That is a simplistic comment. Children and young adults, like older adults, need positive reinforcement and encouragement. All humans need acknowledgement of a good well done and we all wish to develop a positive student culture and climate in a school. We do not want students doing something just for the acknowledgement, but being relational creatures, communication and positive acknowledgement assist in our development.

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