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We don’t need no educator : The role of the teacher in today’s online education

We don’t need no educator : The role of the teacher in today’s online education | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Stephen's Web, the home page of Stephen Downes, with news and information on e-learning, new media, instructional technology, educational design, and related subjects

Via juandoming, Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

While the video is not great quality the audio has excellent content and the slides support well. The medium may be average but the message is worth the effort.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:27 AM

A MUST read and watching the video from conference also...

 

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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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Visions: Next Gen Learning Spaces - YouTube

Visions takes a closer look at the work being done around the University of Melbourne on learning spaces. 

Allan Shaw's insight:

There are some lovely spaces seen here and disucssed a little. in addition to those mentioned and seen, the Ormond College Library is superb as a learning space.

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PhotoMath & Reactions To It From Around The Web - Larry Ferlazzo

PhotoMath & Reactions To It From Around The Web - Larry Ferlazzo | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
You may have already heard about PhotoMath, the new iPhone app that lets you point it at a math problem on a textbook and then solves it while showing all the work involved.


Some are immediately reacting by citing it’s potential use in “cheating,” while others cheer that it might force math teachers and textbook publishers to be more creative in how they teach math. In some ways, it may force them to do what some of us in other subjects have been looking at — creating unGoogleable questions.


Here are some useful posts about the app, along with a video."


Via John Evans
Allan Shaw's insight:

The promo looks slick. I suspect that it does not work quite that well based on some preliminary feedback. But even if it does work well, it seems it might achieve what  WolframAlpha can do without the typing.

It and similar technologies will sensibly provide Maths teachers with a good reason to reflect upon their practice. Good teaching cannot be replaced by a machine as it contains a positive relational component.

perhaps the reverse could be true: Any teacher who can be replaced by technology, probably should be replaced if they are no better than a machine.

 

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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 25, 11:10 AM

So, there is this app called PhotoMath. Aim it at your textbook, and it can solve the written problem. It has caused an immediate reaction among teachers, parents and students. They key point is, is it cheating? Should students use the app? When is this type of technology truly useful? Is the answer section at the back of the book just as bad - or is this app better, because it goes through the steps required to solve the problem? Exactly how accurate is it, and does it show the 'right; way of solving the problem? This link leads to a collection of articles that explore these issues, plus more information on the app. 

Chris Carter's comment, October 26, 8:31 PM
Yes, a friend texted me link to the site just yesterday. His take is that it works quite well, except that it struggles to pick up negative numbers if that number begins the math problem.
Melissa Marshall's comment, October 27, 3:43 AM
Good to know - thanks Chris.
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25 Things Skilled Learners Do Differently

25 Things Skilled Learners Do Differently | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Imagine for a moment that all human beings had the same IQ, but that some of us knew how to tap into it better than others. How would we approach education differently?"


Via EDTC@UTB
Allan Shaw's insight:

25 things skilled learners do is an excellent list for use with both students and for adult learning. It is important that these attributes and skills are nurtured in a school culture and are implicit in classroom practice and taught explicitly where appropriate.

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Leslie Wilson's curator insight, October 14, 4:08 PM

skilled learners' - their approach

 

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Rethinking Linear Leadership For Creativity And Innovation

Rethinking Linear Leadership For Creativity And Innovation | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"If the solution and the destination are determined up front, it leaves little if any room for creativity and innovation..."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The clearer the 'destination', the less creativity and to a lesser extent innovation can flourish. Yet, we should know our goals. Conundrum? Quite possibly. But not necessarily. Innovation and creativity can be expressed through the journey towards the goal(s). Though demanding of time and energy and a bit messy, innovation is worth the effort at least some of the time.

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Don’t Go Back to School: How to Fuel the Internal Engine of Learning

Don’t Go Back to School: How to Fuel the Internal Engine of Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'“The present education system is the trampling of the herd,” legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright lamented in 1956. Half a century later, I started Brain Pickings in large part out of frustration and disappointment with my trampling experience of our culturally fetishized “Ivy League education.” I found myself intellectually and creatively unstimulated by the industrialized model of the large lecture hall, the PowerPoint presentations, the standardized tests assessing my rote memorization of facts rather than my ability to transmute that factual knowledge into a pattern-recognition mechanism that connects different disciplines to cultivate wisdom about how the world works and a moral lens on how it should work.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

For those that work in schools, this post by Maria Popova, reviewing Kio Stark's Don’t Go Back to School: A Handbook for Learning Anything, provides much food for thought. Stark and Popova mention the motivators that work for learning, recalling Daniel Pink’s advocacy of autonomy, mastery, and purpose as important criteria for successful. Our job is to consider how to better bring this trifecta into schooling.

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How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset

How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Coaches operate with an underlying assumption that giving advice to others undermines the confidence and self-worth of others.  Others don’t need to be fixed.  In teaching we need to move to exactly this stance in order to foster creativity in our students–to allow our students the choice, control, novelty and challenge that builds their creativity. 


Without the assumption that our students are already competent, imaginative, and ready to burst forth with regular exhibitions of novel and valuable ideas and products, we are limiting their creative capacities before they’ve even had a chance to discover them."


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

It remains easy to slip back into the mindset, perhaps habitual, that knowledge is something to be transmitted by the teacher and the student is an empty vessel to be filled. While there is some truth in this stereotype, research on neuro-plasticity, understandings about how learning occurs, and about interpersonal skills suggest clearly that a growth mindset model is more useful for teaching and learning  with children and young adults.

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Pamela Perry King's curator insight, September 29, 11:19 AM

Growth is the key to success!

Sandra Oeding-Erdel's curator insight, September 29, 10:11 PM

Mindset and reflection 

Growing Up Greatness's curator insight, October 5, 3:23 AM

So important to have an expectation that all students have the capacity to learn and contribute to learning.

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Spirituality without religion and how to live with presence

Spirituality without religion and how to live with presence | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Most of us spend our time seeking happiness and security without acknowledging the underlying purpose of our search. Each of us is looking for a path back to the present: We are trying to find good enough reasons to be satisfied now.

Acknowledging that this is the structure of the game we are playing allows us to play it differently. How we pay attention to the present moment largely determines the character of our experience and, therefore, the quality of our lives.
Allan Shaw's insight:

"We seem to do little more than lurch between wanting and not wanting. Thus, the question naturally arises: Is there more to life than this? Might it be possible to feel much better (in every sense of better) than one tends to feel? Is it possible to find lasting fulfillment despite the inevitability of change?

Spiritual life begins with a suspicion that the answer to such questions could well be “yes.” And a true spiritual practitioner is someone who has discovered that it is possible to be at ease in the world for no reason, if only for a few moments at a time, and that such ease is synonymous with transcending the apparent boundaries of the self. Those who have never tasted such peace of mind might view these assertions as highly suspect. Nevertheless, it is a fact that a condition of selfless well-being is there to be glimpsed in each moment."

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7 Ways to Thrive with a Bad Boss

7 Ways to Thrive with a Bad Boss | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

If you don't have a bad boss now, you'll have one soon. Bad bosses: Don’t listen. Use power for personal advantage. Always know. Is that the type of person you want to fight with?" There follows ways to thrive with a bad boss. 

Allan Shaw's insight:
7 ways to thrive with a bad boss:

The following ways to thrive with a bad boss make sense based on my experience though I find #5 problematic. To get on their team is one thing, to pick up their priorities - maybe but to use their modes of communication and adopt their values is not reasonable. Most bad bosses are unethical based simply on the fact they use power for personal advantage.


"1. Don’t kiss:

 Don’t expect them to change and stop trying to change them.

2. Accept:

Don’t do anything more until you accept who they are. 

3. Gratitude:

Be grateful for opportunities to develop:

PatiencePersistence.Endurance.Kindness.Forgiveness.Calmness.Creativity.Flexibility.Generosity.Humility.

4. Develop and grow:

The personal qualities and behaviors that enable you to thrive under a bad boss take you far in life and leadership.

5. Get on their team:

Find a way to get on their team unless they’re unethical, immoral, or criminal. Adopt their priorities, preferred methods of communication, and values.

6. Brag:

Every time you feel like complaining, brag. Build a positive presence by bragging about others. Talk about the accomplishments of your team and colleagues.

7. Connect:

Connect with someone – outside your organization – who succeeded with a bad boss. Don’t gossip about your boss to your colleagues.

The turn:

Turn away from frustration and toward the future. Frustration is a great motivator as long as you don’t get frustrated with being frustrated."

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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, October 16, 4:08 PM

If you have not gathered by now, the article suggests that bosses who are not unethical, immoral or criminal are not really that bad. However, they can be difficult to work for.

 

In the words of Jack Welch: Tough Guys Finish First! http://sco.lt/5pA7MX

 

Guy Kawasaki of Apple fame also offered good advice on how to THRIVE! http://sco.lt/5YXgRd

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Lesson Study [Infographic]

Lesson Study [Infographic] | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

According to Robinson (2009), “Taking part in collaborative enquiries into improving teaching and learning is the single most impactful action a school leader can take to improve educational outcomes for pupils.”

Lesson Study is one way of achieving this. It is a planned programme of teacher enquiry which originated in Japan. It enables teachers to work collaboratively in order to explore and improve their own practice.

 

However, it requires a strong commitment from staff and is time-consuming. As such, school leaders must be serious about setting time aside for teachers to meet, observe each other, and give feedback. This might involve getting cover for some lessons.

 


Via Gust MEES
Allan Shaw's insight:

Teachers working collaboratively is a critical path towards success. It is hard work, painstaking at times but needs to occur and continue over time.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 26, 2:50 PM

According to Robinson (2009), “Taking part in collaborative enquiries into improving teaching and learning is the single most impactful action a school leader can take to improve educational outcomes for pupils.”

Lesson Study is one way of achieving this. It is a planned programme of teacher enquiry which originated in Japan. It enables teachers to work collaboratively in order to explore and improve their own practice.


However, it requires a strong commitment from staff and is time-consuming. As such, school leaders must be serious about setting time aside for teachers to meet, observe each other, and give feedback. This might involve getting cover for some lessons.


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20 Tips To Reduce Student Anxiety

20 Tips To Reduce Student Anxiety | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
20 Tips To Reduce Student Anxiety
Allan Shaw's insight:

It is interesting to note that when 'translated' into adult terminology these hints seem like common sense. Perhaps they are common sense. Perhaps it is common sense to treat young people with the same respect and care we would expect for ourselves.

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Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection

Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"..Students use this “checklist” in order to develop and enhance their growth mindsets through personal accountability and reflection.

Did I work as hard as I could have?Did I set and maintain high standards for myself?Did I spend enough time to do quality work?Did I regulate my procrastination, distractions, and temptations in order to complete my work?Did I make good use of available resources?Did I ask questions if I needed help?Did I review and re-review my work for possible errors?Did I consider best practices for similar work?Is my work something for which I am proud – that I would proudly show to a large, global audience?"
Via Amy Burns
Allan Shaw's insight:

Did you fit into any of these categories whilst a student? I'm pretty sure I had my moments. Maybe you never had to battle these situations, if so you are lucky.

Mediocre is often good enough for me as long as I get the work done.It is okay to just do “enough” work to minimally fulfill the requirements.Good grades are what really matter to me.  I am not really interested in receiving qualitative feedback.

What made you change? The answer is 'gold'! I think I have worked it out for me!

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Amy Burns's curator insight, September 24, 6:27 AM

Great set of reflective questions prompting a growth mindset.

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10 Rules for Moving Forward without Permission

10 Rules for Moving Forward without Permission | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"The path of least resistance is a long path to mediocrity. All leaders press through resistance. If there’s no resistance you’re not reaching high enough. Don’t play dead if it really matters."

Allan Shaw's insight:

This is a good post and well worth reading. It is about transparency, perseverance, honesty and integrity in leadership and thus is not simple nor easy to accomplish.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 8, 7:47 PM

There are other rules including just doing it and letting the chips fall where they may. Many people we refer to as "leaders" are managers. Sometimes, when it is the right thing to do, asking forgiveness is easier than permission and it is not dishonest.

 

To equate teaching and leading as one, we have to allow teaching and leading to co-exist.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble

Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Nearly seven years after first opening its doors, the Science Leadership Academy public magnet high school* in Philadelphia and its inquiry-based approach to
Allan Shaw's insight:

A good brief insight into some of the advantages and limitations of inquiry learning.

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Expert panel: what makes a good teacher

Expert panel: what makes a good teacher | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Amid debates about teacher quality and training, and with the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group soon to report on teacher education, we asked a panel of experts just what makes a good teacher…
Allan Shaw's insight:

In the article four academics outline their thoughts on the attributes of a good teacher. Their responses are well worth reading and some resonated deeply with me.This excerpt is but one:

"The other challenge is that teacher-student relationships are multi-faceted. In fact, there are three key facets to teacher-student relationships:

The interpersonal relationship (the student connecting with WHO the teacher is as a person);

The substantive relationship (the student connecting with WHAT the teacher is saying and the tasks assigned by the teacher); and,

The pedagogical relationship (the student connecting with HOW the teacher communicates the subject matter and assigns the tasks to be accomplished).

We refer to this type of relational instruction as “connective instruction”. In fact, we liken a great lesson to a great musical composition: it takes a great singer (WHO), a great song (WHAT) and great singing (HOW)."

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Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In

Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Your intuition is never enough.
Allan Shaw's insight:

The article makes a good plausible case for engaging in experimental testing prior to a considerable change of direction and the devotion of significant amounts of resource is worthy of consideration.

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Five Future Technologies That Will Shape Our Classrooms

Five Future Technologies That Will Shape Our Classrooms | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Nick Grantham of FractusLearning describes how five emerging technologies, despite their science fictional nature, might be used in classrooms of the not-too-distant future.
Allan Shaw's insight:

These technologies offer perhaps unheard of opportunities for learning. Such technologies will place enormous pressure on traditional modes of operation and thus will elicit a tendency towards a false dichotomy. Some will see the new technologies as a panacea for the ills of the present and past; others will wish to hold on to the positive aspects of current practice and thus dismiss the new technologies. The reality will be the technological advances will continue to arrive. increasingly they will be of a kind that enhance learning through human interfaces developments. It is critical we look openly at the opportunities they provide and carefully protect the values and opportunities that humans as relational creatures need to thrive.

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‘We must never forget that pupils are not data and teachers are not data managers’ - Education - TES News

‘We must never forget that pupils are not data and teachers are not data managers’ - Education - TES News | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Much of the data gathered comes from exams, and the data revolution in schools has seen exam grades become as much about the performance of the teacher and school as they are about the student."

Allan Shaw's insight:

Wherein lies the balance between the appropriate and reasonable use of data to improve outcomes for students and the loss of student outcomes as the goal of education. Those outcomes need to be both those outcomes that can be easily measured and those that are not so easily measured. It would be counter productive if the data became the end rather than the means.

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Why Girls Tend to Get Better Grades Than Boys Do

Why Girls Tend to Get Better Grades Than Boys Do | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
New research shows that girls are ahead in every subject, including math and science. Do today's grading methods skew in their favor?

Via Chris Carter
Allan Shaw's insight:

Most experienced educators know of the differences between boys and girls in school situations. Some of the strategies mentioned here are worthy of consideration.

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The Role of Servant Leadership in Faculty Development Programs: A Review of the Literature


Via Dennis T OConnor
Allan Shaw's insight:

Servant leadership is useful and a necessary part of the repertoire of a good leader. As online learning grows, the use of this mode of leadership in this context of online learning is important. It fits well with the hoped for and planned development of a self directed and autonomous learner.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 19, 10:52 PM

Great ideas for faculty and program development for online schools at both the K-12 and College levels. 

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K-12 Curriculum Needs a Major Overhaul to Develop Entrepreneurship Skills

K-12 Curriculum Needs a Major Overhaul to Develop Entrepreneurship Skills | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
We need to rethink how we teach children if we are to graduate adults who can fill the available jobs and grow the economy larger.
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post appears sensible and plausible at the headline level. Many educators would see the point of entrepreneurship skills. The detail of the post outlines a case for teaching coding and other technology skills because that is where current jobs vacancies occur.

Coding maybe useful but teaching thinking logic skills, analytic thinking skills, collaborative teamwork skills and empathy set in engaging contexts of real work for a real audience seem a much more useful reason to overhaul a curriculum.

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I am anxiety

I am anxiety | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
One in four of us experience it, yet we don't talk about it. This is why.

 

Anxiety is something that, like many others, I've assumed is just a part of my personality - an embarrassing quirk I try to keep contained. It's something I've learned to manage through meditation techniques, exercise and avoiding the odd occasion - some social functions, for instance - where I fear it might rear its ugly head.


Via Peter Mellow, Deborah Welsh
Allan Shaw's insight:

It is in the interest of educators to understand and work with students and peers suffering high levels of anxiety. High levels of anxiety diminish learning! It is as simple as that!

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More on Student Questioning in the Classroom

More on Student Questioning in the Classroom | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

For the better part of the last week, I've been consumed with the notion that one of my primary responsibilities as a teacher is to encourage student questioning in my classroom...."

Allan Shaw's insight:

“Children are the research and development division of the human species,” child psychologist Alison Gopnik argues in Berger’s book.  Stirring their creativity and curiosity depends on nothing more than teachers who diligently avoid the temptation to “teach too much, too soon.”  What kids need most is the chance to develop their own questions and search for answers independently.

By creating a classroom environment where I’m answering all of the questions that my kids have, I’m “inadvertently cutting off paths of inquiry and exploration that kids might otherwise pursue on their own” (Berger, 2014, p. 43)

Sounds good but we also have a significant curriculum to deliver, developing a range of skills and dispositions across many domains, questioning being one, an important one, but one none the less.

 

 

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The Next Big Thing in Well-Being

The Next Big Thing in Well-Being | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"It’s not the job that stresses people

It’s a common assumption that work alone causes stress, but in our experience, work itself is not the primary source of stress for most people. People who complete our stress assessment regularly cite family, success and money as their key sources of stress.
Allan Shaw's insight:

"Bottom line, work isn’t the primary stressor—and yet the effect of addressing emotional wellness clearly plays out at work.


Three powerful correlations between inner and outer well-being:

Sleep, eating habits, and physical fitness consistently correlate to stress levels. Self-esteem and how well connected one feels to their work positively correlate with sleep, eating habits and physical fitness.

People who score low on getting regular exercise tend to have 20% lower resilience scores and correspondingly 47% higher stress index scores.

And people who scored high on ‘feeling overwhelmed’ and ‘being able to balance the competing demands in their lives’ had 29% lower resilience scores and 71% higher stress index scores."

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Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds

Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
New research shows works by writers such as Charles Dickens and Téa Obreht sharpen our ability to understand others' emotions – more than thrillers or romance novels, writes Liz Bury
Allan Shaw's insight:

Reading literary fiction improves empathy, study finds. This is an interesting finding given that so many writers suggest that EQ skills and dispositions are so crucial to success in the 21st century.

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