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Are You Managing To a 'T'? Time To Break With Tradition — HBS Working Knowledge

Say hello to the T-shaped manager. In this HBR excerpt, HBS professor Morten Hansen and colleague Bolko Von Oetinger introduce a new-generation exec who shares information horizontally across the organization as well as vertically among...
Allan Shaw's insight:

While the language of 'revenue' and 'business units' is somewhat difficult for educators, the concepts of T shaped leadership are worthy. 'Transfer of best practice', 'peer advice' for high quality decision making, 'shared expertise', 'cross pollination of ideas' and 'coordinated implemantation' are valuable in the complex environments of large schools.

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Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones

Study Finds How Parents And Children Actually Use Smartphones | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
The Rogers Innovation Report looked at parents and young adult children to see how they use their smartphones.
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Agron S. Dida's curator insight, April 28, 2014 6:16 AM

Smartphones are just little notebooks we are going to use for emergency only. (By the way I am 63!)

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Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Students own their struggles and strengths when they lead parent-teacher conferences.
Allan Shaw's insight:

I think this quote from the post sums up why this is useful and well worth reading and reflecting upon. 'At California’s Impact Academy, three or four different sets of students and their families meet simultaneously, as teachers circulate through the room, making sure parents are getting their questions answered, and only intervening if the student is struggling. Yet in all cases, the basic spirit is the same: this is the student’s moment to share his or her reflections on achievements and challenges.'

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10 Phrases Incompetent Leaders Keep Saying and 10 Ways to Rise

10 Phrases Incompetent Leaders Keep Saying and 10 Ways to Rise | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Everyone who gets ahead establishes a track record of reliability." What you say and how it is said does mattter.

Allan Shaw's insight:

The ten phrases incompetent leaders or indeed those without confidence use are correct, but I the ten ways to improve are much more useful. The improvements are commonsensical but harder to live out as a matter of course each day.

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3 Things That Have Slowed the Change Process Down in Education (And What We Can Do About It)

3 Things That Have Slowed the Change Process Down in Education (And What We Can Do About It) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"To become a master teacher, you must become a master learner....Classroom teaching has long been an isolating profession where collaborative talk was difficult if near impossible. With social media, that isolation is now a choice educators make."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The three things this post focuses upon as working against innovation in education are firstly, professional isolation of teachers preventing collaborative discussion, secondly, a continuous focus on student weaknesses, rather than building upon their strengths, loves and passions and thirdly, experience is a very powerful teacher and in what other profession do neophytes come to the profession with up to 16 years of watching others fulfill the role!

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The Algorithm

The Algorithm | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
“What are people going to do for a living when their muscle power is no longer valued because we have all kinds of muscle accelerators and then their mental power is not as valued anymore because we have these astonishing digital technologies that can do mental things, cognitive things that we used to previously require people to do?” -Andrew MacAfee excerpt from ‘Most Likely To Succeed’
Allan Shaw's insight:

This post poses significant questions for school leaders, answers to which requires thought on my part. I agree with the description of the societal shifts occurring around us right now. For example the original iPhone is less than 8 years old! In that time smart phones have made significant impact on our lives; just walk down a street! I'm not a supporter of stopping technological development; that is near impossible. How do we manage some of the influences?

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The Science Behind Gratitude (and How It Can Change Your Life)

The Science Behind Gratitude (and How It Can Change Your Life) | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
People who take time to reflect upon the things they're thankful for are happier, sleep better, and have stronger immunity. Here's how to make it work for you.
Allan Shaw's insight:

Aaah! It sounds simple and perhaps even a bit silly for the hard bitten amongst us, but it seems to work for me! It takes a conscious effort but is worthwhile.

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How to Be a Genius in Seven Questions

How to Be a Genius in Seven Questions | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"At the beginning, you offer answers. In the end it's about questions. The right answer is always preceded by the right question....If your organisation expects leaders to have answers, ....in truth it's institutional helplessness that makes others expect answers from you."

Allan Shaw's insight:

It's been a difficult skill to stop and think about asking a good question rather than provide an answer. A good point in between is to offer options, joining in the quest for the best solution. In school education there can be several 'right' answers; it takes a little time, reflection and discussion to tease out the best in the current circumstances.

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How Steve Jobs Fouled Up Presentations For The Rest of Us

How Steve Jobs Fouled Up Presentations For The Rest of Us | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
VideoUntil his passing three years ago Steve Jobs was widely recognized as the standard bearer for effective presentation method and technique. And he was tremendous. But here’s the trouble with Steve Jobs the presenter: he was an immensely charismatic individual pitching some of the most exciting consumer technology the world [...]
Allan Shaw's insight:

Presentations: Another view. Perhaps, like me, you're not as good at a 'stand and deliver' presentation as Steve Jobs was, or are not prepared to set aside the time required to get it perfect. In which case this post can provide some other interesting alternatives.

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Six ways Australia's education system is failing our kids

Six ways Australia's education system is failing our kids | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Australia's facing a slow decline in most educational standards and few are aware just how bad the situation is getting.
Allan Shaw's insight:

As an experienced educator, these six reasons make sense. They need to be addressed, though some of the headline suggestions put forward for improvement seem glib. Perhaps a greater societal focus on values leadership, the development of character, preparedness to take on tougher (learning) challenges, and a recognition that education needs more than worthy platitudes by politicians and policy makers to be successful.

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects'

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy. Which makes it all the more remarkable that Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional “teaching by subject” in favour of “teaching by topic”.

Allan Shaw's insight:

"Finland is about to embark on one of the most radical education reform programmes ever undertaken by a nation state – scrapping traditional “teaching by subject” in favour of “teaching by topic”." This will be an interesting development to observe. I will be very interested in the education component, pedagogical approaches and measure of success gained. I will also be interested in the commentary of education policy makers and politicians who have cited Finland as worthy of emulation.

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Some Thoughts on Hope, Cynicism, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves

Some Thoughts on Hope, Cynicism, and the Stories We Tell Ourselves | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

To live with sincerity in our culture of cynicism is a difficult dance — one that comes easily only to the very young and the very old. The rest of us are left to tussle with two polarizing forces ripping the psyche asunder by beckoning to it from opposite directions — critical thinking and hope.

Critical thinking without hope is cynicism. Hope without critical thinking is naïveté.

 

Allan Shaw's insight:

"What storytellers do — and this includes journalists and TED and everyone in between who has a point of view and an audience, whatever its size — is help shape our stories of how the world works; at their very best, they can empower our moral imagination to envision how the world could work better. In other words, they help us mediate between the ideal and the real by cultivating the right balance of critical thinking and hope. Truth and falsehood belong to this mediation, but it is guided primarily by what we are made to believe is real."
"Yes, people sometimes do horrible things, and we can speculate about why they do them until we run out of words and sanity. But evil only prevails when we mistake it for the norm. There is so much goodness in the world — all we have to do is remind one another of it, show up for it, and refuse to leave."

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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.

People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


Via Seth Dixon
Allan Shaw's insight:

This is a neat synopsis of some of the complexity around cultural difference and cultural similarities. The views expressed carry an unstated need for education and empathy as vehicles to improve understanding.

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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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10 Ways to Divest and Distribute Control

10 Ways to Divest and Distribute Control | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'Centralized control makes weak leaders feel powerful...

“My primary focus…was to divest control and distribute it to the officers and crew.” Captain David Marquet, former Commander of the USS Stanta Fe.

If the Commander of a nuclear-attack submarine can divest and distribute control, I bet you can too.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post lists 10 ways to divest and distribute control and all make good sense. However, while all sound quite simple and straightforward, they are not simple, nor straightforward to enact in any context. They require considerable thought, planning, and self-regulation. In the case of school leaders, they also require care due to the lack of prescriptive procedure (perhaps unlike a submarine) that exists in most schools, that is a lack of clarity about how to undertake the business of teaching and learning. Schools often have more procedural clarity with the administration of the school than with the school's core business, teaching and learning.

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Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning

Curiosity: The Heart of Lifelong Learning | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

'If you suspect that curious kids fare better in careers and life, you're right—for a variety of reasons. Research suggests that intellectual curiosity has as big of an effect on performance as hard work. (link is external) When put together, curiosity and hard work account for success just as much as intelligence.

.

Another study found that people who were curious about a topic retained what they learned for longer periods of time (link is external). And even more impressive, research has linked curiosity to a wide range of important adaptive behaviors, (link is external) including tolerance of anxiety and uncertainty, positive emotions, humor, playfulness, out-of-box thinking, and a noncritical attitude—all attributes associated with healthy social outcomes.'

Allan Shaw's insight:

This post explains the importance of curiosity and lists ten strategies to sue to develop curiosity. We worth reading and for reflection to consider using in classrooms.

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Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015

Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Smartphones are fueling a shift in the communication landscape for teens. Nearly three-quarters of teens now use smartphones and 92% of teens report going
Allan Shaw's insight:

Whilst US data, this Pew Research Center material is reassuring in one way. It confirms what I see anecdotally in my community in another country. This is useful background information for educators.

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21st Century Smart: Staying Relevant In The Artificial Intelligence Age

21st Century Smart: Staying Relevant In The Artificial Intelligence Age | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Unless you have been under a rock, you know that the world is changing fast. You know that technology advances, especially smart robots and smart thinking machines, will continue to drive change. They will raise serious questions about how anyone over the age of 18 stays relevant and competitive job-wise [...]
Allan Shaw's insight:

Professor Ed Hess lists seven new habits to cultivate to build relevance and competence in a coming age of smart machines. I would see the seven habits as those required of anyone wishing to positively influence, lead or work with others now and in the past. They make good sense for positive human relationships.

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Mindset, attitude and behaviour

Mindset, attitude and behaviour | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Mindset posters, assemblies and other messages from staff might change student attitude about mindset i.e. that a growth mindset is preferable in terms of improving achievement, but will they change student behaviour?  Will they bring about a change in terms of how a student actually ‘works’, that will shift them more towards a growth mindset?  Probably not.  In order to achieve this, we would be more sensible using our time to come up with a ‘toolbox of strategies’ that students can use in lessons, everyday, to foster a growth mindset. We need to look at changing their behaviours as well as their attitude.  Just telling students to put more ‘effort’ into their work is not useful – they need to know what this means."

Allan Shaw's insight:

Changing attitudes and behaviour is hard work for all concerned. It is cultural change and so much of our culture is ingrained and habitual. As a result, attitudes and behaviours are not at the forefront of our conscious mind and thus not reflected upon simply. Change without reflection and focus does not happen unless 'inflicted' externally and then will only last while the pressure is applied. Cultural change requires external incentives, internalised reflection and focus on developing better attitudes and behaviours all applied over time.

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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers
Allan Shaw's insight:

Research suggests that homework for primary age students is problematic, the more so the younger the students. At the other end of the spectrum, students in year 12 gain significantly from productive work outside of the classroom. This chart is worthy of reflection about how to frame work outside the classroom.

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7 Ways to Save Another's face

7 Ways to Save Another's face | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
7 ways to save another’s face:

Leaders protect the dignity of others.

Be yourself. Don’t feel the need to lift yourself by putting others down.
Believe others want to help, unless there’s clear evidence to the contrary.
Ask, “What am I missing,” when you feel someone pushing back. Avoid the trap of pushing back when you feel push back.
Bolster the image of others in the eyes of others.
Speak in private when confronting or challenging.
Employ good manners, always. Another’s poor behavior is never an excuse for you to behave in-kind.
Speak the truth with kindness. Smile, unless a smile might seem frivolous or disrespectful.

Feeling respect is feeling valued. Giving respect is valuing others.
Allan Shaw's insight:

Seven ways to save another's face is a good list to use. This post also lists 12 ways to humiliate others. I am guilty of some of these some of the time. It is a good list to try and avoid and if focusing on the seven items in the more positive list, you will be lead away from the negative activities.

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Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors. If you aspire for your organization to be faster, more innovative, less afraid..."

Allan Shaw's insight:

The info-graphic embedded in this post and used as the illustration is a a wonderful list by which to make a self assessment. To my mind leadership is a commitment, transparency, communication to many, etc. are the measures that I excite and inspire me in my school leader role.

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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, March 22, 8:58 PM

Imagine if we all became a little bit more innovative...

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11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs

11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs | Leadership in education | Scoop.it
11 reasons why Steve Jobs is still the world's best business communicator.
Allan Shaw's insight:

11 Presentation Lessons You Can Still Learn From Steve Jobs. If public speaking and presentations are a part of your role and this would include all teachers and school leaders, then this is worth a look. There are many lessons here that are not much more than common sense, but together they are a very useful set of communication skills.

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Parent Engagement: Where does your school fit in the continuum ?

Moving schools and communities through the Family-School and Community Engagement Continuum. An Infographic.

Allan Shaw's insight:

Parent Engagement: An info-graphic. This is a neat little thought starter on parent engagement in a school education context.

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Want to sound like a leader? Start by saying your name right | Laura Sicola | TEDxPenn - YouTube

How do we sound credible? Dr. Sicola (http://vocalimpactproductions.com/about/) shows how your vocal delivery influences how your message is received, and ...

Allan Shaw's insight:

Do you sound like a leader? Do you have vocal credibility? This TEDx talk is worth the time to watch and reflect. As one who never aspired to public speaking, this talk has assisted me to place a framework around the anecdotal learning and copying of good speakers I have conducted over many years.

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, March 22, 6:11 PM

Do you sound like a leader? Do you have vocal credibility? This TEDx talk is worth the time to watch and reflect. As one who never aspired to public speaking, this talk has assisted me to place a framework around the anecdotal learning and copying of good speakers I have conducted over many years.

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A fight or a feed? Making progressive politics in schooling • Inside Story

A fight or a feed? Making progressive politics in schooling • Inside Story | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

Dean Ashenden writes a well argued and insightful review of "Who is afraid of the big bad dragon? Why China has the best (and worst) education system in the world" by Yong Zhao.

Allan Shaw's insight:

Dean Ashenden writes a well argued and insightful review of "Who is afraid of the big bad dragon? Why China has the best (and worst) education system in the world" by Yong Zhao. Ashenden points to a worrying, perhaps increasing, tendency to use polemic and in particular, false dichotomies in the complex field of debate regarding the measuring of success of outcomes and what should be the standards in school education.

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Parental Engagement in Learning

The evidence base and definition developed by an ACT Department of Education and parent groups partnership for improving parental engagement in their child's education.

Allan Shaw's insight:
"Parental engagement involves partnerships between families and schools to promote children’s learning and wellbeing. It involves:- family‑led learning focused on high aspirations for children, shared reading, a positive environment for homework, parent‑child conversation, a cognitively stimulating home environment and support for social and emotional wellbeing; and- family‑school partnerships that encourage positive parent‑teacher relationships, communication about children’s progress, and engagement in the school community, while equipping parents to effectively support and encourage their children’s learning

and well-being."

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How Lewis Carroll’s Rules of Letter-Writing Can Make Email More Civil and Digital Communication Kinder

How Lewis Carroll’s Rules of Letter-Writing Can Make Email More Civil and Digital Communication Kinder | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

"If your friend makes a severe remark, either leave it unnoticed, or make your reply distinctly less severe."

Allan Shaw's insight:

In the mid 19th century, Lewis Carroll wrote a few sage rules for the art of letter writing. Over 150 years later much of what he wrote remains valid. While the medium of communication may have changed, the inherent qualities of human nature and the need for relationship have not. These 'rules' are well worth reading. 'Only when we step out of the reactive ego, out of the anxious immediacy that text-messaging and email have instilled in us, and contemplate what is being communicated — only then do we stand a chance of being civil to one another, and maybe even kind.' The quantity of work related communication has grown exponentially, yet that means we have more correspondents and thus a greater opportunity for positive influence.

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