Leadership Development for a Globalized Era
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Leadership Development for a Globalized Era
Inspiring examples, thought provoking research and the latest thinking on leadership development and the skills needed to lead in an increasingly complex, fast-changing and interconnected world.
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About Leadership Development for a Globalized Era

About Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Our aim with this site - Leadership Development for a Globalized Era - is to provide you with the latest thinking in leadership development and the skills needed to lead on a global scale. Within this we will explore innovation in collaboration and approaches to working in an increasingly complex, fast-changing and interconnected world. In addition to publishing our favourite articles and research we will also seek to introduce you to inspirational people and organisations working within this exciting arena.

 

We are Matthew, Amanda and David, three members of Emerging World – an organisation that provides experiences that enable leaders to transform the way they think and act to succeed in the reality of fast-changing, complex business environments. At Emerging World we strive for a world where leaders behave authentically, companies succeed responsibly and every one of us has the opportunity to achieve our potential. 

 

Within our work we are privileged to explore the frontiers of leadership, corporate volunteering, experiential learning and mutually beneficial business. We are excited to share our insights on these topics with the hope that this enables all of us to learn, grow and connect.

 

We hope you enjoy digesting what is curated here. You're welcome to connect and find out more at:

 

Emerging World:  www.emergingworld.com

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The Changing Face of Executive Education

The Changing Face of Executive Education | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Uber has disrupted the taxi industry, Airbnb the hotel industry and Facebook has disrupted the media industry. These are significant shifts which are transforming business and society, with the respective organizations becoming ultra-successful by responding to the changing needs, preferences and values of consumers. So, what about the executive education industry, is that being disrupted?

 

Executive education is a massive industry, in the US alone companies spend $14 billion (€12.5 billion) annually on leadership development, the primary providers being business schools. But whether the providers of leadership development programs are meeting the satisfaction and needs of their target audience remains to be an open question.

Sally Brownbill's insight:

The latest blog from Emerging World takes a look at the changing face of executive education. 

 

We are currently seeing changes to many industries in response to consumer needs and preferences. This blog piece looks at the leadership development needs of organizations and how those requirements are disrupting the executive education industry. 

 

Emerging World

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Steve Bax's curator insight, October 25, 2016 4:16 AM
Interesting blog and scoop by Sally Brownbill
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When travel doesn’t broaden the mind: Which international moves are right for your leaders? |  YSC

When travel doesn’t broaden the mind: Which international moves are right for your leaders? |  YSC | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it
International placements are becoming an essential tool in the leadership development toolkit. However, is the significant upheaval, investment and disruption really worth it? Here, we propose a three-step process to help you choose the right international moves for your leaders, set them up for success and evaluate their effectiveness.
Emerging World's insight:

Very glad to see this write up on the power of formalized international assignments, as part of a broader HR toolkit in developing global leaders.  That organizations need to progress their thinking, and be more critical and systemic in selecting the right international assignment for the right leadership development intervention. Where long term expatriation or rotational assignments may no longer be the best answer to developing global leaders. The answer is no longer back or white, but a number of shades exist of what is the best fit for the assignee and the respective organization. Considering, the double edged sword, of high cost and high failure rate of such a proposition,  the authors, outline a 3 stage framework for us to review and ponder over if we are thinking of implementing or revamping an international assignment program for optimal effectiveness.

 

Emerging World

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12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future

12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

According to Tanmay Vora, "The hallmark of VUCA world is that there are no silver bullets."

 

"The rate of change in the business world today is greater than our ability to respond. In a world that is often described as VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and ambiguous), there are major tectonic shifts that demand a new mindset of leadership."


Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Kevin Watson
Emerging World's insight:

Within the business world, the term VUCA is becoming very popular to describe the kind of world in which we live  This graphic and article does a great job is summing up some of the main issues concerning how to lead in this environment.

 

Emerging World

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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, May 2, 2016 3:43 AM
Nice infographics ;-)
Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 6, 2016 3:58 AM
Le leader du futur...le
Ian Berry's curator insight, September 26, 2016 10:41 PM
A good infographic for dealing with disruption
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Dealing with Ambiguity

Dealing with Ambiguity | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Dealing with business complexity and its ever-increasing velocity remains most organizations’ major challenge in terms of recruiting and maintaining effective leaders. We are all familiar with the issues of ambiguity and the skills increasingly required to deal with it: curiosity, sense-making, resilience, and perhaps above all self-knowledge.

 

None of these are ‘new’ to the business world, but they remain hugely difficult things to acquire and develop when you are more than fully occupied in ‘getting your job done’ with all the daily administrative tasks, meetings and fire-fighting that managers and executives face week after relentless week.

Emerging World's insight:

As global business changes, organisations are required to do the same with leadership development programs;  ensuring that they addresses changes in the mindset and skills required by managers to manage in a complex globalised world.

 

This article discusses the changing face of leadership development from traditional classroom knowledge dumping to experiential learning as a way of addressing global businesses requirement to produce and maintain successful leaders.

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Are You Developing Global Leaders?

Are You Developing Global Leaders? | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

In its 2015 report on global leadership, the Institute for Corporate Productivity and the American Management Association declared the era of national companies was over. But only half of businesses considered developing global leaders a priority, and only a third of respondents believed their global leadership development initiatives were effective.

 

Reasons for this failure run the gamut. Some point to a lack of soft skills development. Others blame outdated development strategies or a short-sighted view of who should be developed. But the world won’t wait for businesses to figure things out. Without effective global leaders, businesses shouldn’t count on experiencing much success abroad. The i4cp paper reports that top-performing companies are often 14 times more likely than their low-performing peers to report strong business results in the global marketplace — results attributable to leaders who possess the ability to drive performance in a global business environment.

 

“Companies that want to be successful globally need to have global leaders,” said BPI Managing Director of Leadership and Talent Practice Michael McGowan.

Sally Brownbill's insight:

This article discusses the importance of approaching global leadership development in today’s diverse and complex marketplace. It looks into how, now more than ever, global leaders need to work from a place of empathy, curiosity and humility, and discusses development approaches to achieve these behaviours.

 

It’s great to read an article showcasing differing experiential learning program designs, while highlighting the importance of such programs to impact leadership behaviours for success in today’s global business.

 

Emerging World

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Experiential learning transcends on-the-job training and builds global leaders

Experiential learning transcends on-the-job training and builds global leaders | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

"While leadership development always has been at the core of the charter for Training professionals"the importance of developing global leadership competencies recently has been raised to new levels of criticality" says Sam Davis, Vice President of the American Management Association commenting on their 2015 global leadership study undertaken in partnership with the Institute for Corporate Productivity.

 

"Existing and upcoming leaders today need to have a broader skill set, one that equips them to think and act globally. Leadership success depends upon the ability to lead across cultures, time zones, and geographies. It often requires making decisions in ambiguous environments, understanding cultural nuances, and adapting one’s style accordingly. A good track record in one country does not guarantee success in the global arena, nor will merely exposing high-performing leaders to new cultures make them effective multinational leaders. Neglecting global leadership development is every bit as devastating to the organization as missing financial targets."

 

The study highlights a number of key findings:

  • Experience is a powerful teacher. Active, experiential learning transcends on-the-job training and builds global leaders.
  • Business and financial acumen are fundamental capabilities for leaders; social skills are the real differentiators in the global environment.
  • Global development that begins with first-level leaders or individual contributors fuels success. Delaying such efforts until candidates reach higher leadership levels has a negative effect on development effectiveness.
  • Global mindset is a distinctive characteristic of effective global leaders. Embracing cross-cultural diversity and driving collaborative relationships within and beyond organizations are hallmarks of this evolved perspective.
Matthew Farmer's insight:

What this 2015 study shows is how important experiences are for developing the kind of characteristics that leaders need to have to be successful in a global environment.  I'm looking forward to the results if this year's study which should be out soon .

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The Management Thinker We Should Never Have Forgotten

The Management Thinker We Should Never Have Forgotten | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

WE Deming offered up 14 principles that stood in stark contrast to the sorts of practices he thought were eroding the performance of top corporations in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s. The list might seem almost quaint today, but it’s worth recounting:

 

  • Create and communicate to all employees a statement of the aims and purposes of the company
  • Adapt to the new philosophy of the day; industries and economics are always changing
  • Build quality into a product throughout production
  • End the practice of awarding business on the basis of price tag alone; instead, try a long-term relationship based on established loyalty and trust
  • Work to constantly improve quality and productivity
  • Institute on-the-job training
  • Teach and institute leadership to improve all job functions
  • Drive out fear; create trust
  • Strive to reduce intradepartmental conflicts
  • Eliminate exhortations for the work force; instead, focus on the system and morale
  • Eliminate work standard quotas for production. Substitute leadership methods for improvement
  • Eliminate MBO. Avoid numerical goals. Alternatively, learn the capabilities of processes and how to improve them
  • Remove barriers that rob people of pride of workmanship
  • Educate with self-improvement programs
  • Include everyone in the company to accomplish the transformation

Via David Hain
Matthew Farmer's insight:

These principles were created during the 1970's and 1980's and when you read this list now the messages, while still relevant, almost seem to state the obvious.  At the time, some of these ideas will have been radical and may not have gained traction, which is maybe why he was 'forgotten'.

 

What they be saying the same thing in 50 years' time about the principles of purpose, inclusive business, shared value, systems -leadership, global mindset, digital disruption and leading in the network age that are trying to get traction right now?

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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David Hain's curator insight, July 4, 2016 5:15 AM

W E Deming died in 1991 - but his legacy has never been more relevant. Re-read his principles!

Steve Bax's curator insight, July 6, 2016 4:21 AM
Are we learning yet?
Steve Bax's comment, July 6, 2016 4:22 AM
Very good scoop David.
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The Economy for the Common Good

The Economy for the Common Good | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

What is the role of a company in the universe? When an organization is founded, the question is Why? Is the answer: to produce clothing so people can stay warm – or whatever they create? Or to maximize profits for the founders and the investors?

 

The Economy for the Common Good is a movement started in Austria by Christian Felber and a group of 12 entrepreneurs who at their heart believe that we have lost sight of the purpose of companies and economies.  The belief is that rather than companies and the economy serving society and enabling us all to prosper, we have reached a stage where we serve the financial objectives of companies.

 

The movement is growing and expanding internationally and this article summarises some of its main points together with 10 principle to follow for the Common Good.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

This is another example of thinking (alongside phenomena such as b-corporations and Joel Bakan's seminal work, The Corporation) about how organizations have evolved to a point where they no longer serve the purposes they were supposed to.

 

It highlights why people are searching for meaning in their work and why organizations struggle to define their purpose.

 

The challenge for leaders is to help people see the purpose of their work and how it aligns with their purpose as individuals. Quiet often, this needs to be achieved within the disabling environment of how organizations are constituted and the obsessive focus of governments and investors on economic growth at all costs.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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Will collective intelligence change the way we work? | MIT Sloan Executive Education

Will collective intelligence change the way we work? | MIT Sloan Executive Education | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

One of the hardest shifts for a leader, and by extension the organization, to make, is to move from a centric mind-set to collective intelligence where we are able to tap in to the wisdom of many. As organizational design is being becoming more and more decentralized, unfortunately, our centric mind-set is not following the same pattern. Considering the magnitude, pace and complexity of challenges and required solutions are continually increasing within our organizations, leaders need to carve out a space for collective intelligence to flourish. Feel comfortable with not making all the critical decisions, having the best ideas or being the single source of knowledge. By no means am I recommending to eliminate top-down structures in organizations, but for leaders to understand when and how to utilize collective intelligence for the greater good of the organization.

 

emergingworld.com

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Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs

Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

True two-way conversations reflect a more open, balanced, and reciprocal sharing of perspectives. Here, communication is approached as a puzzle or a collage, with each person holding a critical piece. The purpose is not to deliver the perfect message or to win people over, but to explore an issue or opportunity together — pooling observations and data, raising and testing assumptions, and creating new ideas out of the mix.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
Emerging World's insight:

In today’s fast-paced economy leaders are bringing together teams with diverse experiences, resources and perspectives to identify game changing opportunities for their organisations. However, for such collaboration to succeed, genuine communication is essential. This article in Strategy + Business offers advice for leaders looking to master the art of two-way communication:

 

  1. Slow down - create the opportunity for people to come to you with new information, questions, or ideas.
  2. Create a safe space – it is important it is to create psychological safety, if you want to explore diverse views and foster ideas.
  3. Ask inviting questions - Questions help you focus a conversation without limiting creativity.
  4. Listen with a willingness to be influenced - The best way to improve communication is to focus on the listening part. How much time do you (really) allow for listening to others and what they want to discuss?
  5. Use reflection to deepen the learning - You can build the skills for dialogue by periodically pausing to reflect on your conversation. Simply ask people to call out what is working and ways the group might engage more effectively.
  6. Summarize and ask for commitment - As two-way conversations are usually wide-ranging, it is very important to recap what was discovered, where you are now, and what is needed next.

 

When considering opportunities to develop leaders’ two-way communication skills, Action Learning incorporates the elements recommended here, whilst allowing diverse groups to work together to identify creative solutions to real problems.

 

www.emergingworld.com 

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 1, 2016 2:41 PM

By Elizabeth Doty: As a leader, communicating can sometimes feel like Groundhog Day. No matter how hard you try to get your message across, it is all too easy to find the next day that you face the same blank stares, predictable objections, and questions that indicate that you failed to make it stick — that people just aren’t getting it..

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Consciousness, the Next Competitive Advantage

Consciousness, the Next Competitive Advantage | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

We generally fail to see, let alone deal with, the grossest waste that occurs in nearly all organisations; namely the low value placed on people.


The impact the person has on an organisation which they work for / are involved with goes a great deal further than whatever job or role description they may have.

Most role descriptions still flounder in the quagmire of sticking to what is easily described and therefore easily measured. Yet the largest impact that any person will have on the organisation in which they are involved will be from factors having nothing to do with their role description.

Paradoxically it is the subtle and most difficult to quantify qualities of people which will have the greatest effect on the organisation and on how they fulfil the formal role which has been described for them.


Via David Hain
Matthew Farmer's insight:

Interesting reflections on how traditional organizational systems and behaviour, stifle human creativity and wellbeing.

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Kevin Watson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:42 AM

Bring out the richness in people through dialogue, rather than redcing it by form filling and 9 boxes!

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, March 26, 2016 12:11 PM

Bring out the richness in people through dialogue, rather than redcing it by form filling and 9 boxes!

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, April 4, 2016 4:46 PM

Bring out the richness in people through dialogue, rather than redcing it by form filling and 9 boxes!

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The Four Orientations of Responsible Leaders

The Four Orientations of Responsible Leaders | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

This is a neat synopsis of the work of Thomas Maak, Nicola Pless and David Waldman on responsible leadership on Ideas For Leaders.

 

They identify four different types of responsible leader and a model of responsible leadership which can help us understand how responsible leadership can enhance our personal reputation, our company’s reputation, and help strengthen those bonds with the society we serve. 

 

1. Traditional Economist
Characterized by short-term economic value creation targeted towards shareholders. This type of responsible leader is likely to be risk-averse, highly rational and analytic, possibly quite autocratic in approach. Any CSR initiatives would be determined on a strict cost-benefit basis, with compliance to industry norms being the driving force.

2. Opportunity Seeker
Like the traditional economist, the opportunity seeker may have similar economic goals of investing in CSR to improve financial performance, but takes a longer-term approach to value creation with the aim of realizing competitive advantages, such as new market opportunities, or a better reputation. In other words, CSR is viewed as good for business, it is a good PR tool.

3. Integrator
This type of RL goes beyond economic, legal or PR concerns, incorporating a broader perspective on business responsibilities. That is, if you run a business responsibly and purposefully, profits will result anyway, as Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, exemplifies: “I drive this business model by focusing on the consumer and customer in a responsible way, and I know that shareholder value can come.”

In contrast to opportunity seekers, the integrator’s stronger sense of accountability means they try to deliver on multiple bottom lines, responding to the aims of all stakeholders, not just those interested in the economic bottom line.

4. Idealist
Finally, an idealistic approach to RL occurs predominantly among leaders who act as social entrepreneurs. They are driven by strong ethical intentions, seeing the company as a means, not an end, to allowing them to tackle social problems or respond to environmental needs, even if that is at the cost of business growth.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

Yesterday we posted the results of a survey that suggested that current leaders view high ethical standards as the most important competency required for sucessful leadership. With that in mind its interesting to revisit this model of Responsible Leaership.

 

My feeling is that most people still approach things as 'Traditional Economists'.  It's basically corporate responsibility as risk aversion.  What we need to see more of are leaders that embrace the other personality types.  With this mindset, the challenges that we face as a society are potential business oppportunities and addressing them will provide our companies and employees with a greater sense of purpose.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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What the VUCA!

What the VUCA! | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it
Understanding VUCA and how it is used as a framework to help leaders navigate the modern world.
 
The term VUCA, an acronym of Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous was originated by the American military to describe extreme conditions during warfare. VUCA has more recently been adopted by an increasing number of CEO’s and organizations as a framework to approach different types of challenging situations bought about due to external factors such as politics, economics, society, advancing technology and the environment. To provide insight on the relevance of VUCA for today’s leaders, and to highlight the importance of having the ability, skills and mindset to lead in VUCA world, this blog piece aims to provide an understanding of the term, by providing examples of each element.
Sally Brownbill's insight:

I joined Emerging World in March 2016, coming from the medical device industry. As with most new roles in different industries, I was welcomed with a whole host of new acronyms to learn and understand. An acronym frequently used is VUCA, a term I was not familiar with. A VUCA world is pivotal to program design at Emerging World, it is used to help leaders and organizations understand the world in which their business operates. In this blog, I share my learnings and understanding of VUCA.

 

Emerging World

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Sally Brownbill's comment, December 14, 2016 7:12 AM
Thank you for sharing
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If You’re Not Outside Your Comfort Zone, You Won’t Learn Anything

If You’re Not Outside Your Comfort Zone, You Won’t Learn Anything | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Stop avoiding what scares you.

 

You need to speak in public, but your knees buckle even before you reach the podium. You want to expand your network, but you’d rather swallow nails than make small talk with strangers. Speaking up in meetings would further your reputation at work, but you’re afraid of saying the wrong thing. Situations like these — ones that are important professionally, but personally terrifying — are, unfortunately, ubiquitous. An easy response to these situations is avoidance. Who wants to feel anxious when you don’t have to?

Emerging World's insight:

A short, but worthwhile, read from Andy Molinsky on stepping out of our comfort zones to grow.

 

At one time or another all of us need to step out of our comfort zone either at work or in our personal lives. The truth is, if we never leave our comfort zones, we will never truly learn anything, I mean a deep learning that goes beyond just awareness but to be embedded as behaviours. If you think about it, in most major transitions in our lives we have to step out of our comfort zone – a new job, getting married or being  promoted – we are thrusted into such experiences without being truly prepared.  Yet, what if we were a bit more deliberate, and had the time and space to sculpt experiences that would take us out of our comfort zones? As Andy puts it, for us to think about it as a learning process,  where we are conscience of what is taking place and “to take the plunge”. Would we be more inclined if we had greater control and psychological safety net to  experience discomfort? Perhaps!

 

Every so often, we have to break our own mold to grow!

 

Emerging World

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As Work Changes, Leadership Development Has to Keep Up

As Work Changes, Leadership Development Has to Keep Up | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

As work itself is changing, some of the basic tenets of leadership development are being challenged. The very idea of leading people in jobs is changing with the democratization of work and the continued advance of digital technology. These twin forces are moving work beyond the traditional structure of activities that are organized into stable jobs within a siloed organization. Work is being disaggregated into tasks that can be dispersed inside and outside of the organization — the “uberization” of work.

And as AI and robotics increasingly supplement and replace the work of humans, the expectations of leaders — truly understanding the work, how it can be executed now and in the future, and the cost, capability and risk implications of current and future work options — are increasing exponentially.

To meet these challenges, we see three priorities for developing the next generation of leaders in the “work-disrupted” age:

 

·         Mastery of Digital

·         Beyond-the-Classroom Experiences

·         Expert Coaching

Sally Brownbill's insight:

A view of work changes that have disrupted the tradition leader role. From advances of digital technology to the types of people forming the workforce, the article suggests three priority areas for leadership development focus.

 

Emerging World

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Leadership challenges growing faster than skills

Leadership challenges growing faster than skills | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Since the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Daiichi is still dealing with radioactive waste left behind. Less well known is the crisis at Fukushima Daini, a nearby sister plant, which also suffered severe damage, but averted meltdown. 


Faced with a crisis in a volatile environment, where none of the usual rules applied, the site superintendent, Naohiro Masuda, and the rest of Daini’s 400 employees charted their way through the chaos as models of adaptive leadership: standing in the truth and uncertainty of the situation, creating a sense of safety so as not to rush into reaction, together continuously gathering/sharing information to make sense of the situation, making and revising plans openly and adapting as the information changed.

While an extreme example of leadership in a crisis situation, the Fukushima story illustrates that leadership matters and can be a great advantage for an organisation.

Sally Brownbill's insight:

This article demonstrates how leaders are currently face escalating challenges in a world characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) using the example of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

 

The article discusses the most effective ways to develop leaders in order to solve problems in this type of environment. Particularly interesting, is the emphasis on action learning as a powerful tool to help leaders look at issues differently and build competencies to improve performance and solve real-world issues.

 

Emerging World

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Sally Brownbill's comment, September 22, 2016 5:52 AM
Thank you for sharing Yves
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To Step Up as a Leader, You Need to Step Out

To Step Up as a Leader, You Need to Step Out | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Most professionals aspiring to positions of greater responsibility have little time to map out a strategy for reaching their long-term career goals. But what made executives successful in the past does not guarantee their success in the future. In this article, Herminia Ibarra the author of Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader discusses how executives can step up their leadership potential.

 

The thoughtful approach consists of three core elements: making your day-to-day work more strategic; diversifying your network; and transforming your leadership style and identity. It may take some time until these activities become habits, but once the changes become internalized, your identity as a leader will be clear.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

In this article (available from IESE Publishing), Herminia Ibarra provides a practical, helpful framework to help leaders develop while they are on the job.  

 

Stepping out into a newer, greater leadership role is a journey and not an event but individuals need help to be able to support that transition over time and this framework will help them to help themselves. 

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What Does It Take to Develop Globally Competent Leaders?

What Does It Take to Develop Globally Competent Leaders? | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Most companies recognize the importance of training top leaders in global competence skills, according to a recent survey of more than 300 HR professionals by US Business School, UNC Kenen-Flagler and the Human Capital Institute.

 

Many companies, however, are unsatisfied with their leaders’ and potential leaders’ skills in this area and a variety of methods can help build multicultural sensitivity and other global capabilities.  

 

Asked to list the most effective methods for developing global competence, the respondents offered the following:

  • Projects with team members from multiple countries (89.1%)
  • Expatriate assignments (88.2%)
  • Short-term international assignments (85.9%)
  • Global stretch assignments (85.9%)
  • 360 multi-rater global competency assessment (85.8%)
  • Formal action learning projects (84.6%)
Matthew Farmer's insight:

This study concludes that to be effective global leadership development should be deliberate and experiential. Three of the top 5 growth areas are fully immersive - Service Learning in Diverse Settings, Formal Action Learning Projects and Global Stretch Assignments.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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The Urgent Need To Develop Global Leaders For Company Growth

The Urgent Need To Develop Global Leaders For Company Growth | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

In my recent research on developing global leadership, I came across an interesting paper by the consultancy ZengerFolkman, written up in Forbes magazine.

.

One of their key proposals is that global leadership development begins too late in people's careers.  However they also notes that there is a lack of formal structure about developing global leadership and propose a simple model:

 

"A global leadership development program must take place within the context of the company’s long-term strategy. Once that strategy is defined, then the organization needs to take several steps. Here’s one model to consider:

1. Create a new mindset and awareness among the senior leadership team

2. Establish a new culture and context that will support the creation of global leaders

3. Identify the unique capabilities required of a global leader for your organization

4. Begin developing future global leaders early in their careers

5. Utilize the most proven development techniques

6. Devise ways to better identify global leadership potential"

 

Matthew Farmer's insight:

If you want to be effective at developing global leadership, begin it earlier in people's careers and provide a structure around their global leadership experiences.

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The 50 Most Powerful Questions Leaders Can Ask

The 50 Most Powerful Questions Leaders Can Ask | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

According to Mike Myatt, "The best leaders don’t engage in monologues; they stimulate conversations. They understand conversations are not competitions to be won, but opportunities to enrich, inspire, challenge, illuminate and learn. So, what makes for great dialogue? Great questions."

 

His belief is that, "the most powerful question of all is the one that works within the context of the situation at hand. The question must be appropriate to the person(s) being addressed, the timing must be spot-on, but most importantly it must unlock the door to reveal the needed input/feedback/information."

 

In this article he lists 50 of the best questions he's come across.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

The ability to question effectively is often highly underrated but in many ways it is the single most important competency that we possess as leaders, parents and innovators.  The art of asking the right questions at the right time can have a profound effect on people - just ask a good coach or an inventor.

 

Leaders often begin their careers feeling that they need to have all of the answers.  In truth, the sooner they realise that they don't (and shouldn't feel they have to) and instead begin to ask questions and admit they don't know, the more effective they become as people leaders.

 

This article provides a list of useful questions to ask and reading through the list is stimulating - trying to understand why these questions are powerful is particularly interesting.  But most of all leaders need to learn how to ask the right questions so that choosing the right questions is a skill that comes naturally.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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Scooped by Sally Brownbill
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The Best Leaders Are Constant Learners

The Best Leaders Are Constant Learners | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

As we attempt to transition into a networked creative economy, we need leaders who promote learning and who master fast, relevant, and autonomous learning themselves. There is no other way to address the wicked problems facing us. If work is learning and learning is the work, then leadership should be all about enabling learning. In a recent Deloitte study, Global Human Capital Trends 2015, 85% of the respondents cited learning as being either important or very important. Yet, according to the study, more companies than ever report they are unprepared to address this challenge.

Sally Brownbill's insight:

This post was one in a series of perspectives by presenters and participants in the 7th Global Drucker Forum. The post suggests that Leaders that stay on top of society’s changes do so by being receptive and able to learn. Sustaining a competitive advantage through people that know how to build relationships, seek information, make sense of observations and share ideas.

 

An interesting post that considers how leaders can hope to manage complexity and get comfortable with living in a state of continually becoming in an ever-changing world.

 

Emerging World

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Scooped by Becky Willmoth
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Collective Leadership: A Competitive Advantage

Collective Leadership: A Competitive Advantage | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it
Most organizations focus on developing individual leaders, ignoring the collective effectiveness (how leaders show up together to lead the organization) of the leadership system.
Becky Willmoth's insight:

The article discusses the importance of collective leadership, arguing that individual leadership effectiveness is necessary, but insufficient, for extraordinary business performance. Instead collective effectiveness determines the success of an organisation.

 

It’s great to see that collaboration amongst leaders is being debated and interesting to consider leaders’ collective ability to work together as a limiting factor in the success of an organisation.

 

Emerging World

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Building Better Support Systems for Intrapreneurs

Building Better Support Systems for Intrapreneurs | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Most companies claim to support entrepreneurial behavior — but their employees are not so sure. The research speaks volumes: Only 20% of employees in an Accenture study said their managers encourage entrepreneurial ideas. Another survey showed that 70% of successful entrepreneurs developed their big idea while working at an established organization and then left to commercialize it on their own.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

In today’s VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous) economy intrapreneurship is gaining popularity as a way of sustaining competitive advantage. This HRB article highlights that it is not only individuals within an organisation who must be encouraged to find their inner entrepreneur, but the culture of organisations must also evolve so allow innovations to then flourish. The author suggests four key components can help create an organisational culture that is flexible enough to enable creativity and build momentum yet firm enough to keep intrapreneurs on track:

 

  1. Make it easy to conduct the first experiment - encourage the creation of a prototype to test with just one customer.
  2. Add structure to unstructured time – provide a structure and time to develop relevant side projects.
  3. Support, don’t control – empower individuals to make some of the big decisions on their own by encouraging them to ‘fall in love with the problem not the solution, take risks and regroup based on learning.
  4. Value ‘Return on Intelligence’- Look at learning as part of the return to create a corporate culture that doesn’t fear failure.

 

Emerging World

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Rescooped by Matthew Farmer from Leadership
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How to Avoid the Biggest Mistake Leaders Make

How to Avoid the Biggest Mistake Leaders Make | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Over 1,400 people were presented a list of common leadership mistakes and were asked to select the top five. Two of them stood out clearly from the rest: Not providing appropriate feedback was chosen by 82%, with failing to listen or involve others a close second, chosen by 81%. 


Via Anne Leong
Matthew Farmer's insight:

Very interesting to see the importance of good listening and effective feedback in day to day leadership situations.

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Rescooped by Emerging World from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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The Most Important Leadership Competencies, According to Leaders Around the World

The Most Important Leadership Competencies, According to Leaders Around the World | Leadership Development for a Globalized Era | Scoop.it

Sunnie Giles is engaging a piece of leadership research recently completed the first round of a study of 195 leaders in 15 countries over 30 global organizations with the question what makes an effective leader?

 

Participants were asked to choose the 15 most important leadership competencies from a list of 74. These are grouped into five major themes that suggest a set of priorities for leaders and leadership development programs. "While some may not surprise you", Sunnie says "they’re all difficult to master, in part because improving them requires acting against our nature."


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Emerging World's insight:

It's interesting to compare what current global leaders think is important compared with what 'followers' think is important and what we think will be important in the future. I think there are probably some big differences - at least in relative importance..

 

One thing I find fascinating is that high moral and ethical standards is so high and yet few companies have programs that seek to develop 'responsible' leadership.  Is this just because it is assumed as innate or too politically charged to deal with?

 

What I like about this piece is how Sunnie explores what's happening under the headline statements and references neuroscience in her explanation of why particular behaviours are important and also why many are actually quite difficult.

 

www.emergingworld.com

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The OHS Professional 's curator insight, March 17, 2016 3:55 AM

Leadership – When it comes to leadership one may think that a leader is one who tell others what to do and makes things happen, this may be true to an extent but what makes a great leader? These values here are what makes a great leader a leader leads at the front and empowers others to feel good about what they do. Encourages and mentors’ the future. ‘Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it's amazing what they can accomplish.’ This is the making of a great leader and this is what inspires me.

Steve Bax's curator insight, March 18, 2016 3:53 AM
Interesting scoop by  Bonnie Hohhof here.