Leadership Change...
Follow
Find
714 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Warren Norton
onto Leadership Change & the Future
Scoop.it!

The Content You Read Shapes How You Lead: Top 10 Leadership Themes

The Content You Read Shapes How You Lead: Top 10 Leadership Themes | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
People are consuming massive amounts of content each day via their smartphones, laptops, tablets and the multiple social media platforms, blogs and publications they engage with.
Warren Norton's insight:

There are some interesting thoughts in this article. Hopefully, it will provoke some deep thinking.

more...
No comment yet.
Leadership Change & the Future
Top articles about powerful leadership & organisational and personal change
Curated by Warren Norton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

15 Ways To Drive Behavior Change

15 Ways To Drive Behavior Change | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Successful change builds on altered behavior. Therefore, your change strategy has to include a plan that helps people change their behavior.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

When Understanding "Why" Might Not Matter in Change Management

When Understanding "Why" Might Not Matter in Change Management | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Does everyone really need to understand why a change is happening in order to adopt it? Maybe not. Many models of organizational change management as
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

The Future of Management Is Teal

The Future of Management  Is Teal | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Organizations are ready for their next evolutionary step: a step toward self-management, wholeness, and a new sense of purpose.
more...
Sabrina Murphy's curator insight, January 11, 6:16 PM

With both a balance and a specific pace to find for each organization, though.

via Warren Norton

Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

5 Career Questions To Ask Yourself Instead Of, "What's My Passion?"

5 Career Questions To Ask Yourself Instead Of, "What's My Passion?" | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
There's a much more practical way to chart your career path.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Agility is today's most critical leadership competency | @Julie_WG

Agility is today's most critical leadership competency | @Julie_WG | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
A friend who coaches a girls soccer team recently shared, that after a tough loss, one of her 13-year-old players said, “Well, you know coach, you either w
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

How to sell a tale: the power of stories in marketing

How to sell a tale: the power of stories in marketing | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Brands aren't built on facts and statistics alone. Connecting with customers means understanding and deploying the power of stories in marketing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

What is Positive Leadership?

What is Positive Leadership? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
By Linda Fisher Thornton

Positive leadership is a new term that is popping up regularly in articles. What does it mean? What kind of leadership do we describe as positive?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

7 Wastes That Impact Business Growth - Blog | LeanKit

7 Wastes That Impact Business Growth - Blog | LeanKit | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Outpace your competition and help your business run leaner by eliminating these 7 wastes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

The Peer-To-Peer Bonus System

The Peer-To-Peer Bonus System | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
In a business that depends on collaboration, you should receive your bonus from your colleagues (not from your manager) with a peer-to-peer bonus system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

6 Ways to Challenge Your Leadership Assumptions

6 Ways to Challenge Your Leadership Assumptions | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
A decades-old study of culture in leadership provides some insight on what underlies your beliefs about leaders and what they do.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Warren Norton from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age?

Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it

Advancement in digital technologies has disrupted everything, including leadership styles.

 

Employees want more ownership rather than to follow instruction; customers want to participate in the marketing and development process; and leaders are finding that open and agile organizations are able to maneuver more effectively than organizations where all insight and direction comes from the top. In short, the autocratic Commander, whether brilliant or misguided, just won’t cut it anymore.


 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Becky Willmoth's curator insight, February 20, 2015 6:08 AM

Within this article four leadership styles are discussed, with a place advocated for each. However in the digital age, the co-creator is the most desirable and rarest of the leadership styles described. Desirable as she or he generates more innovation, growth and profit. Rare as the capabilities required of this leader are complex and borne of authenticity and trust, with a preference for eco, rather than ego, systems.


To support the evolution of the co-creator, leadership development approaches should enable leaders to create broad and diverse networks, encourage them to bridge (or remove) boundaries, offer a space to relinquish control and the desire to create shared value. 

june holley's curator insight, February 20, 2015 7:10 AM

Even though this is directed at businesses, it shows how we are moving to a network age where people want to be part of engaged networks. How do we shift our ideas about leadership to support this larger shift?. 

Shannon Banks's curator insight, February 22, 2015 5:29 PM

Top-down leadership is no longer viable in the digital age. This article gives great context for technological reasons behind this shift.

Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Point of view - how storytellers create truth

Point of view - how storytellers create truth | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Point of view tells us through whose eyes we see a story. No point of view, no story. This article tells you how to control point of view. My daughter was reading Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Corporate immunology: Why companies seem to reject change - CR Magazine

Corporate immunology: Why companies seem to reject change - CR Magazine | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
By Richard Crespin Companies, like all organisms, are lazy and defensive. More scientifically stated, companies try to protect the organism by responding to external stimulus with the most efficient use of energy. That is predictable, rationale, and effective. People and organizations don’t fear change. They fear loss. When something new appears in the environment – …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Agility is today's most critical leadership competency | @Julie_WG

Agility is today's most critical leadership competency | @Julie_WG | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
A friend who coaches a girls soccer team recently shared, that after a tough loss, one of her 13-year-old players said, “Well, you know coach, you either w
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

My Top Ten Business Success Tips

My Top Ten Business Success Tips | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
In this blog, John Spence shares his top ten business success tips that will help you grow your business and achieve business excellence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

50 Ways To Increase Your Productivity

50 Ways To Increase Your Productivity | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Here are 50 ways to increase your productivity and add hours to your day. 1. Take a break. You can't always be working at optimum productivity. Instead, yo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions

Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Warren Norton from employee engagement
Scoop.it!

Employees Are Responsible for Their Engagement Too - Gallup.com

Employees Are Responsible for Their Engagement Too - Gallup.com | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Employee engagement has remained stagnant over the past decade. It's time for workers to start doing something about it.

Via Scott J. Simmerman
more...
Claude Emond's curator insight, June 23, 2015 9:47 AM

It starts in your own yard, «the engagement within» !

Claude Emond's curator insight, June 23, 2015 9:47 AM

It starts in your own yard, «the engagement within» !

Cheryl Doig's curator insight, February 2, 2:29 PM

Engagement is a two way street. A key trend is in the growth of 'agency' - me being responsible for my own direction and where my life heads.

Scooped by Warren Norton
Scoop.it!

Change is the Rule, Not the Exception: Say goodbye to your old perceptions of change management

Change is the Rule, Not the Exception: Say goodbye to your old perceptions of change management | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Based on Change Mgmt’s track record, one could make a strong case for expunging the term Change Mgmt and replacing it with “Continuous Change”.
For many years...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Warren Norton from Connection
Scoop.it!

To Stay Focused, Manage Your Emotions

To Stay Focused, Manage Your Emotions | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it

A leader’s most precious resource is not their time. It’s their focused attention. Time merely passes, while focused attention makes things happen. When we’re able to gather and direct our attention toward a particular task or interaction, we can have a significant impact in a minimal amount of time. But when we’re unable to bring our attention to bear on the work at hand, all the time in the world is insufficient. So what are the implications of this for leaders?

Leaders must recognize that it’s essential to work at enhancing their ability to direct their attention and minimize unhelpful distractions, and one of the most important steps in this process is managing emotions. Psychologist Victor Johnston describes emotions as “discriminant hedonic amplifiers,” meaning that they boost various signals in our mental landscape, drawing our attention toward certain issues and events and away from others. In other words, emotions are attention magnets.
Consequently, awareness and regulation of our emotions are central to the productive use of our attention. Here are some practical steps leaders can take.

Build Capacity. We can expand our attentive capacity through a commitment to practices such as meditation, journaling, time in nature, regular physical activity, and good sleep hygiene. All of these activities support our ability to direct our focus, filter out distractions, and manage our emotions, and we can often realize their benefits with a modest investment of time. Recent research indicates that meditating for just a few minutes a day, spending just one hour a week in nature, or jotting down a few reflective notes in the evening has a noticeable impact on well-being. My experience as a coach suggests that these benefits extend to leaders’ effectiveness. The key is a consistent commitment to each daily or weekly practice.
While these activities are often enjoyable in themselves, they aren’t indulgences–they’re investments in our ability to operate at peak effectiveness. High-performing professionals often enjoy success early in their careers by virtue of their ability to forego activities like this–they cut back on sleep or go without exercise for extended periods of time. But while those sacrifices temporarily expand our capacity for throughput, they actually diminish our capacity for focused attention. And while more senior leaders like my clients continue to work hard, what allows them to add value isn’t the extra hours spent working, but rather the quality of their focused attention while they’re at work.

Plug Leaks. Attention is finite, and our ability to focus in the moment is severely limited. Because distractions can fatally undermine effective leadership, it’s critical to avoid “attention leaks.” As I wrote a few months ago, “The functions on our phones and other devices that beep, blink and thrust red numbers in our faces are designed to capture our attention and create a sense of urgency… But how often are any of these interruptions truly urgent? Almost never. Turn them off.”
Another attention-destroying practice is what we’ve come to call “multi-tasking,” an utterly misnamed concept. While insignificant tasks requiring minimal cognitive effort can be performed in parallel, the truly meaningful work through which most leaders add value–one-on-one conversations, facilitation or decision-making in meetings, and creative thought and ideation–require a much more intense level of focus. Multi-tasking in those environments inevitably results in significant inefficiencies as we switch contexts and lose focus before returning to a deeper level of thought.

Create Space. Leaders typically face intense demands on their time (in part because everyone wants their attention), and if they’re not careful they can find themselves booked nonstop for days on end. It’s important to maintain some open space in the calendar, on a weekly or even daily basis, which allows for more creative thinking and helps replenish our stores of attention.
This inevitably involves disappointing people, all of whom believe their issue is worthy of the leader’s time, but productive leaders realize that they can’t meet all of these requests and must ignore many of them. Here leaders require help from their senior team, family, and friends, and–perhaps most importantly–their executive assistants. People in these roles are uniquely positioned to help leaders protect open space on their calendars, and they’re uniquely positioned to undermine that process if they don’t understand this responsibility.

One final thought: If you’re a leader sitting in a meeting that’s not worth your focused attention, then you’re serving a theatrical function. Sometimes this makes sense. There’s a place for organizational theater. But more often the whole organization is suffering because your most precious resource is being wasted. Let the people who organized the meeting know that you’ll attend in the future when you’re needed, excuse yourself, and get on with your day. And if it’s your meeting, then you may well be wasting everyone’s time and attention–they may all be there in a theatrical function because they’re deferring to your authority. Have a candid conversation with a trusted ally, and get some feedback on the utility of your meetings.


Via Linda Holroyd
more...
Linda Holroyd's curator insight, February 4, 2015 4:37 PM

Build Capacity. Plug Leaks. Create Space.

Victor Juarez's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:59 PM

Recomendaciones de Harvard Business Review: El recurso más preciado de un líder no es su tiempo, es su atención enfocada: dormir, hacer ejercicio y apagar el móvil como algunas claves.