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Best Practice? Who Says?

Best Practice? Who Says? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
History is a funny thing. For one reason or another, it keeps repeating itself. Despite the fact that world knowledge is accelerating – it’s doubling at the rate of about once per year – many have ...
Warren Norton's insight:

The topic of 'Best Practice' has been a bugbear of mine for years.  As I see it, those using Best Practice, are following somone else.  The questions arise, "Does their BP suit our culture, style and needs?", "If we model ourselves on them will we ever be better than them?" and "What happens if they keep getting better - won't we always be following?".

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David Hain's curator insight, July 13, 2013 8:11 AM

Lot of sense here...I always think "good practice" is better, if we have to use the term.

John Michel's curator insight, July 13, 2013 9:37 AM

Despite the fact that world knowledge is accelerating – it’s doubling at the rate of about once per year – many have forgotten to put on their “thinking caps.”

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 13, 2013 1:19 PM

Best practice is best practice in one context, but not all. It provide some insight but we need to figure out what applies and what does not in a new context. Education, for example, uses the best practice principle and it is a mess.

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Change is the Rule, Not the Exception: Say goodbye to your old perceptions of change management

Change is the Rule, Not the Exception: Say goodbye to your old perceptions of change management | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Based on Change Mgmt’s track record, one could make a strong case for expunging the term Change Mgmt and replacing it with “Continuous Change”.
For many years...
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To Stay Focused, Manage Your Emotions

To Stay Focused, Manage Your Emotions | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it

A leader’s most precious resource is not their time. It’s their focused attention. Time merely passes, while focused attention makes things happen. When we’re able to gather and direct our attention toward a particular task or interaction, we can have a significant impact in a minimal amount of time. But when we’re unable to bring our attention to bear on the work at hand, all the time in the world is insufficient. So what are the implications of this for leaders?

Leaders must recognize that it’s essential to work at enhancing their ability to direct their attention and minimize unhelpful distractions, and one of the most important steps in this process is managing emotions. Psychologist Victor Johnston describes emotions as “discriminant hedonic amplifiers,” meaning that they boost various signals in our mental landscape, drawing our attention toward certain issues and events and away from others. In other words, emotions are attention magnets.
Consequently, awareness and regulation of our emotions are central to the productive use of our attention. Here are some practical steps leaders can take.

Build Capacity. We can expand our attentive capacity through a commitment to practices such as meditation, journaling, time in nature, regular physical activity, and good sleep hygiene. All of these activities support our ability to direct our focus, filter out distractions, and manage our emotions, and we can often realize their benefits with a modest investment of time. Recent research indicates that meditating for just a few minutes a day, spending just one hour a week in nature, or jotting down a few reflective notes in the evening has a noticeable impact on well-being. My experience as a coach suggests that these benefits extend to leaders’ effectiveness. The key is a consistent commitment to each daily or weekly practice.
While these activities are often enjoyable in themselves, they aren’t indulgences–they’re investments in our ability to operate at peak effectiveness. High-performing professionals often enjoy success early in their careers by virtue of their ability to forego activities like this–they cut back on sleep or go without exercise for extended periods of time. But while those sacrifices temporarily expand our capacity for throughput, they actually diminish our capacity for focused attention. And while more senior leaders like my clients continue to work hard, what allows them to add value isn’t the extra hours spent working, but rather the quality of their focused attention while they’re at work.

Plug Leaks. Attention is finite, and our ability to focus in the moment is severely limited. Because distractions can fatally undermine effective leadership, it’s critical to avoid “attention leaks.” As I wrote a few months ago, “The functions on our phones and other devices that beep, blink and thrust red numbers in our faces are designed to capture our attention and create a sense of urgency… But how often are any of these interruptions truly urgent? Almost never. Turn them off.”
Another attention-destroying practice is what we’ve come to call “multi-tasking,” an utterly misnamed concept. While insignificant tasks requiring minimal cognitive effort can be performed in parallel, the truly meaningful work through which most leaders add value–one-on-one conversations, facilitation or decision-making in meetings, and creative thought and ideation–require a much more intense level of focus. Multi-tasking in those environments inevitably results in significant inefficiencies as we switch contexts and lose focus before returning to a deeper level of thought.

Create Space. Leaders typically face intense demands on their time (in part because everyone wants their attention), and if they’re not careful they can find themselves booked nonstop for days on end. It’s important to maintain some open space in the calendar, on a weekly or even daily basis, which allows for more creative thinking and helps replenish our stores of attention.
This inevitably involves disappointing people, all of whom believe their issue is worthy of the leader’s time, but productive leaders realize that they can’t meet all of these requests and must ignore many of them. Here leaders require help from their senior team, family, and friends, and–perhaps most importantly–their executive assistants. People in these roles are uniquely positioned to help leaders protect open space on their calendars, and they’re uniquely positioned to undermine that process if they don’t understand this responsibility.

One final thought: If you’re a leader sitting in a meeting that’s not worth your focused attention, then you’re serving a theatrical function. Sometimes this makes sense. There’s a place for organizational theater. But more often the whole organization is suffering because your most precious resource is being wasted. Let the people who organized the meeting know that you’ll attend in the future when you’re needed, excuse yourself, and get on with your day. And if it’s your meeting, then you may well be wasting everyone’s time and attention–they may all be there in a theatrical function because they’re deferring to your authority. Have a candid conversation with a trusted ally, and get some feedback on the utility of your meetings.


Via Linda Holroyd
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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, February 4, 4:37 PM

Build Capacity. Plug Leaks. Create Space.

Victor Juarez's curator insight, February 4, 6:59 PM

Recomendaciones de Harvard Business Review: El recurso más preciado de un líder no es su tiempo, es su atención enfocada: dormir, hacer ejercicio y apagar el móvil como algunas claves.

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How do we deal with complexity?

How do we deal with complexity? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Is today any more volatile, uncertain, complex or ambiguous (VUCA) than previous ages? That's up for debate, but nobody denies that volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity are major chall...

Via F. Thunus
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The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader

The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Find out why it's important for leaders to understand how people feel about the freedom they have and their relationships at work.
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5 Big Changes Coming to Human Capital Management

5 Big Changes Coming to Human Capital Management | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
The way we do work is always changing. As new technology continually makes us more efficient, and evolving collaboration strategies have a noticeable impact on the dynamics within the …
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2015 Resolution - Leadership Civility

2015 Resolution - Leadership Civility | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Are you fully satisfied with the growing uncivil culture magnified through movies, TV programs and society in general? How does it affect your leadership, more specifically your serving the  needs ...
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Pocket : The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power

Pocket : The Neuroscience of Bad Habits and Why It’s Not About Will Power | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
When you find something you want to view later, put it in Pocket.
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VUCA: What Does This Mean for Future Leaders

VUCA: What Does This Mean for Future Leaders | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
VUCA creates an interesting challenge for future leaders. New challenges require new skills and abilities in how we lead. Future leaders need to adapt.
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Engage Your Team through Support and Share

Engage Your Team through Support and Share | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Team Engagement is vital to the success of any organization. There are innumerable studies demonstrating that team members are more effective when they work in fully collaboration, than as
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Rise and Fall of Leadership | The European Business Review | Empowering communications globally

Rise and Fall of Leadership | The European Business Review | Empowering communications globally | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
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12 Principles of Collaboration - westXdesign

12 Principles of Collaboration - westXdesign | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Twelve collaboration principles that successful organizations follow.
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The New Rules Of Disruption

The New Rules Of Disruption | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
The formula for disruption is not necessarily becoming smarter, but becoming more aware and creating organizations that can adapt in real time.
Warren Norton's insight:

Without some form of disruption, there would be no impetus to change.  Disruption is crucial to change.  While it sometime occurs outside of our control (economic collapse etc.), it frequently occurs in areas we do have control over.  In both cases, we need to manage the situation and guide our organisations to the new scenario.

 

How we react to disruption is key to the future success of ourselves and our organisations.

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6 Ways to Challenge Your Leadership Assumptions

6 Ways to Challenge Your Leadership Assumptions | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
A decades-old study of culture in leadership provides some insight on what underlies your beliefs about leaders and what they do.
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Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age?

Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it

Advancement in digital technologies has disrupted everything, including leadership styles.

 

Employees want more ownership rather than to follow instruction; customers want to participate in the marketing and development process; and leaders are finding that open and agile organizations are able to maneuver more effectively than organizations where all insight and direction comes from the top. In short, the autocratic Commander, whether brilliant or misguided, just won’t cut it anymore.


 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Becky Willmoth's curator insight, February 20, 6:08 AM

Within this article four leadership styles are discussed, with a place advocated for each. However in the digital age, the co-creator is the most desirable and rarest of the leadership styles described. Desirable as she or he generates more innovation, growth and profit. Rare as the capabilities required of this leader are complex and borne of authenticity and trust, with a preference for eco, rather than ego, systems.


To support the evolution of the co-creator, leadership development approaches should enable leaders to create broad and diverse networks, encourage them to bridge (or remove) boundaries, offer a space to relinquish control and the desire to create shared value. 

june holley's curator insight, February 20, 7:10 AM

Even though this is directed at businesses, it shows how we are moving to a network age where people want to be part of engaged networks. How do we shift our ideas about leadership to support this larger shift?. 

Shannon Banks's curator insight, February 22, 5:29 PM

Top-down leadership is no longer viable in the digital age. This article gives great context for technological reasons behind this shift.

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Change Management versus Change Leadership: What's the Difference? - YouTube

The large majority of organizations expect to achieve results by MANAGING change; more than 70% fall well short. The minority that learn how to LEAD their ch...
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Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Feel Safe To Take Risks

Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Feel Safe To Take Risks | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
The human ingenuity within any organisation are it's greatest competitive advantage. Yet according to the latest statistics, over half of todays workers are disengaged . When leaders are committed and actively working to engage, inspire and embolden – they unleash untapped potential and raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organization contributes to all stakeholders.
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5 Ways Leaders Build a Culture of Trust

Is your organization built on a culture of trust? Look around you; there are plenty of clues as to whether trust abounds. How quickly are decisions made? How many people do you copy (or worse, bcc)...

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, January 10, 2:13 AM

Given that 82% of workers don’t trust their boss, trust is a scarce resource in many organizations.

When it comes to creating a trusting workplace culture, the best place to start is with you. As a leader, you either believe in someone’s trustworthiness or you don’t. Leaders who try to split the difference with “trust but verify” won’t build a culture of healthy organizational trust.

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Neuroscientist warns young brains being re-wired by technology

Neuroscientist warns young brains being re-wired by technology | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
A neuroscientist warns digital technologies are reshaping human brains.
Warren Norton's insight:

If this is correct, it is scary to think what the next generation will be like.  It seems to me that they would be open to greater influence and manipulation than probably any previous generation.  We need to be  teaching people how to think for themselves and how to use critical thinking.

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Change Leadership Beliefs or You'll Change Nothing #peopleskills - Kate Nasser

Change Leadership Beliefs or You'll Change Nothing #peopleskills - Kate Nasser | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Leaders, change leadership beliefs & your spur change/growth. Start with these 3 specific beliefs from The People Skills Coach™.
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The Power of Language: Where Are Your Priorities?

The Power of Language: Where Are Your Priorities? | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Language and your use of it is one of the most powerful instruments you have to create specific outcomes. For instance, you have a certain amount of time each day, where you choose to spend it demonstrates your true priorities.
Warren Norton's insight:

The use of language is something most do not spend any time considering.  We just 'do it'.  This short piece is very insightful and should be given consideration by all.  Leaders in particular should be mindful of the language they use as the consequences can be wonderful or catastrophic.

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The Complexity and Peril of Either/Or Thinking in Systems – How to manage polarities? - Xenergie Consulting Ltd

The Complexity and Peril of Either/Or Thinking in Systems – How to manage polarities? - Xenergie Consulting Ltd | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
This article introduces the benefits of using an awareness of polarities and polarities management in tackling complex issues within an organisational coaching context.
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Criticaleye Community Update

Criticaleye Community Update | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
Criticaleye was created in 2003 with the aim of helping leaders across industry sectors, business functions and geographical locations resolve business issues through peer-to-peer debate and discussion.
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Leadership Rituals that Make Each Day Count

Leadership Rituals that Make Each Day Count | Leadership Change & the Future | Scoop.it
In the words of Napoleon Hill, it is not what you are going to do but what you are doing today that counts. You can learn everything you need to learn in order to achieve anything, but you can never change your leadership until you change your rituals. Rituals can strengthen and spotlight the
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