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Rescooped by SusanThorn from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Study Shows Patients Searching for Health info While in Waiting Room

Study Shows Patients Searching for Health info While in Waiting Room | Leadership | Scoop.it

In another sign of the changing times, a new CDMiConnect report says that patients are using their mobile devices in waiting rooms and, to a lesser extent, exam rooms, more and more to search the Internet for information about the particular health problem that brought them to the waiting room in the first place.

3000 patients, all 18 years of age or older, were surveyed for the report, named “The Patients First Reports: In-Office Mobile Device Use.” Deb Deaver, agency president for CDMiConnect, said that these 3000 patients had over 200 different health conditions and were surveyed in order to “understand the impact of healthcare at our fingertips and uncover how it has influenced the roles we play in each other’s lives.”

What they found, according to managing partner Deana Peck, was “so surprising that we decided to go ahead and publish our findings.”

For instance, the average patient spends about 20 minutes in a doctor’s waiting room (which, frankly, isn’t so surprising) and, during that time, one in five is using their mobile device to search for health information or, as researchers put it, “[turning those] 20 minutes of tedium into a productive prelude to an active doctor discussion.”

What they also found was that healthcare marketers have an incredible opportunity to leverage this time in order to open a dialogue between patients and their particular healthcare provider, as well as provide valuable content that caters to their particular healthcare needs.

Elliott Tyler, managing partner of CDMiConnect, says that “The majority [of patients] were looking for information specifically around their appointment.“ Tyler added that “They want to know ‘what do these symptoms mean’ and are searching for that confidence so they can engage their doctor about it.”

Interestingly this “search for confidence” is the very foundation for nearly all advertising and marketing. Consumers are always searching for information that will support their motivations and desires, no matter what it is that they happen to be doing, and give them the confidence they want/need to proceed.

Tyler confirmed that “The common theme was patients feeling prepared and confident to have that discussion with their doctor.” He said that, in order for agencies to capitalize on this waiting time, they need to think about information that patients are searching for and then focus their strategy on making that information accessible through related content.

He gave an example about someone “using their phone in an exam room, and during their previous appointment, the doctor said he wanted to put them on product X,” continuing by saying that “And so the patient takes out her phone and looks up the side effects, which sound awful to her, and then during the appointment asks what else she could try.”

Talk about keeping a doctor on his or her toes.

From casual users searching for a little bit of information to help them “sound educated” when speaking to their medical doctor, to “power users” who dig deep into Internet content to learn everything possible about their healthcare situation, this new and improved information availability is changing the way healthcare providers communicate with their patients.

And it’s also changing the way marketers create their healthcare related content.


Via Philippe Marchal, dbtmobile
SusanThorn's insight:

Healthcare is evolving. Smart healthcare organizations evolve with it! 

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Rescooped by SusanThorn from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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Study: Health care firms embracing the cloud

Study: Health care firms embracing the cloud | Leadership | Scoop.it

As much as 83 percent of the US health care industry utilizes cloud computing infrastructure to manage data, according to a new study. The report, compiled by HIMSS Analytics, suggests that companies in data-critical sectors of the economy are leveraging the cloud in order to handle the vast troves of information that they deal in.

The survey covered more than 150 businesses that focus on medical practicing, hospital data management and health care systems facilitation. Notably, just 6 percent of those who participated said that they would never actively consider adopting cloud infrastructure as a means to facilitate data. Roughly three-quarters of those who took part in the survey said private cloud solutions are becoming an increasingly more positive solution to their data needs.

"Cloud services have been long praised as a tool to reduce operating expenses for health care organizations. The data presented in our inaugural survey demonstrates the health care industry's eagerness to leverage this resource," Lorren Pettit, a VP of market research for HIMSS, said in a statement.

As well, the report suggested that some challenges remain when it comes to integrating the healthcare system with the cloud. Pettit added that future surveys will look at some of these specific issues, offering companies in the space ideas on how the cloud can be leveraged to solve data-related concerns.

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Via HealthlinkNY, Bart Collet, dbtmobile
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Art Jones's curator insight, June 27, 2014 1:08 PM

Once upon a time the majority of businesses were concerned about security of their data within cloud based platforms, seems those days are far behind us. #TheFutureofHealthcare

Rescooped by SusanThorn from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
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5 memorable moments that shaped health care tec...

5 memorable moments that shaped health care tec... | Leadership | Scoop.it

2013 was a remarkable year for digital health. Health technology was one of the hottest sectors in Silicon Valley in 2013, with investors pouring $1.5 billion into the space by the end of the third quarter.


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mHealth App Growth Nearly Double Overall Mobile Market

mHealth App Growth Nearly Double Overall Mobile Market | Leadership | Scoop.it

Consumer use of mobile health and fitness apps in the first half of 2014 is almost double that of the mobile platform market in general, according to mobile analytics and optimization vendor Flurry.

"We have studied the usage of over 6,800 iPhone and iPad apps listed in the health and fitness category on Flurry’s platform and we have seen a 62 percent increase in usage of health and fitness apps over the past six months," Flurry CEO Simon Khalaf writes in a blog post. "This compares to 33 percent increase in usage, measured in sessions, for the mobile app industry in general. Growth in health and fitness is 87 percent faster than the industry, which is itself growing at an astounding rate."

Khalaf says the trend was a stark turnaround from 2013, in which general mobile app use grew by 115 percent, while health and fitness app use increased by only 49 percent.

The company's analysis found two factors encouraging the rapid groth of mobile health and fitness apps: the ability of smartphones to replace discrete devices as the hardware platform for the apps, and the integration of the apps--such as MapMyFitness--with social networking platforms.

The audience segment leading the mobile health app charge, according to Khalaf, was mothers aged 25-54 who are sports fans and who also lead healthy lifestyles.

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Via dbtmobile
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Mobil apps for a mobil society. 

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Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows | Medicine | Sci-News.com

Obesity is Inflammatory Disease, Rat Study Shows | Medicine | Sci-News.com | Leadership | Scoop.it
Scientists have found abnormal amounts of an inflammatory protein called PAR2 in the fat tissues of overweight and obese rats and humans.

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