Leadership, Toxic...
Follow
Find
4.7K views | +6 today
Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking
Here are three subjects that continue to fascinate: Leadership (in general), Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking.
Curated by george_reed
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by george_reed from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are very different skills. Yet most of the time, we expect corporate executives to wow us with their detail-oriented approach to management and then suddenly metamorphose into visionary leaders the moment they’re promoted. It doesn’t usually work out, says Annmarie Neal, the author of the forthcoming Leading from the Edge (ASTD Press, 2013). “A leader is somebody who sees opportunity and puts change in motion. A manager is somebody who follows that leader and sees how to structure things to create value for the company,” she says. “I’ve found that the best leaders weren’t really good managers. Yes, they understood the discipline, but they weren’t the best accountant, or the best technical person, or the best brand manager. They can do it, but they have a way of [thinking about the issues] at another level.”


Via John Michel, Bobby Dillard, Ivon Prefontaine
more...
John Michel's curator insight, November 9, 2013 12:31 PM

 A leader is somebody who sees opportunity and puts change in motion. A manager is somebody who follows that leader and sees how to structure things to create value for the company.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 9, 2013 7:55 PM

Leadership is about risks, vulnerability, and authenticity.

Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, November 11, 2013 9:56 AM

Truth bespoken.

Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Why Chronic Stress Messes With Your Health

Why Chronic Stress Messes With Your Health | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
A new study provides a better understanding of why chronic stress leads to high levels of inflammation in the body.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Military's top officer stresses character, trust, faith to cadets - Air Force Link

Military's top officer stresses character, trust, faith to cadets - Air Force Link | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Military's top officer stresses character, trust, faith to cadets Air Force Link "It'll be up to you as leaders to take imprecise information and organizations that don't fit exactly right, and weapon systems not designed for every possible...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Do We Really Know How Much We’re Subjected to Workplace Stress?

Do We Really Know How Much We’re Subjected to Workplace Stress? | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
According to the scientists, stress kills.
Stress affects our brain chemistry and our neurological system and makes us gain weight in all the wrong places, like around the belly.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

10 Qualities Every Leader of The Future Needs to Have

10 Qualities Every Leader of The Future Needs to Have | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Aggressive, result-driven leaders have long been considered the best entrepreneurs. But collaboration and communication are proving to be far more valuable...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

On Leadership and The Attitudes for Success

On Leadership and The Attitudes for Success | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Attitudes are the very essence of a person’s relative success or failure on a human relationship basis. In most cases, someone with a bad attitude will struggle much harder for success at almost every level than someone with a good attitude.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Why Is Resilience So Hard?

Why Is Resilience So Hard? | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Resilience has long been touted as an essential capability for bouncing back from leadership setbacks. Earlier this year, Rosabeth Moss Kanter advanced the conversation with an excellent article on the topic.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

When the Boss Is a Bully

When the Boss Is a Bully | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Bully bosses thrive in small companies. Here's how to handle them.
george_reed's insight:

Be very careful when confronting a bully. If they are truly toxic they will attempt to destroy you. Confronting them like a bully on the playground may not be the best advice. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Why We Need More Women Leaders

Why We Need More Women Leaders | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Would it be a better world if women had 50% of the power and leadership?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by george_reed from leadership 3.0
Scoop.it!

Why organizations fail - Fortune Management

Why organizations fail - Fortune Management | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
We have hired and promoted generations of managers with robust analytical skills and poor social skills, and we don’t seem to think that matters.

Via Professor Jill Jameson, Jose Luis Yañez
more...
Professor Jill Jameson's curator insight, October 23, 2013 6:23 PM

Agree  with this article that there is a continuing problem with the lack of organisational recognition of the importance of social skills. 

Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

The Leadership Quarterly | Vol 24, Iss 5, Pgs 625-796, (October, 2013) | ScienceDirect.com

The online version of The Leadership Quarterly at ScienceDirect.com, the world's leading platform for high quality peer-reviewed full-text journals.
george_reed's insight:

A great deal of good behavioral science work on the topic of leadership appears in The Leadership Quarterly.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by george_reed from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

Why employee development is important

Why employee development is important | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it

It’s hard to think of an important aspect of management more neglected than development planning: helping your employees shape the future direction of their careers.  Yet for a variety of reasons, this valuable activity is often ignored… or handled as a bureaucratic exercise… or an afterthought.  Companies pay a high price: the loss of top young talent.


I know when I was in management I didn’t spend as much time as I should have on the development of my own employees.  I did spend some time, but in retrospect I wasn’t as consistent and thorough as I should have been.  And I’m sure it would have been helpful over the years if my own managers had spent more time with me.

These long-held but general impressions were confirmed recently when I happened across a Harvard Business Review study from last July.   The article, “Why Top Young Managers Are in a Nonstop Job Hunt” by Monika Hamori, Jie Cao and Burak Koyuncu, described a study based on analysis of international databases of over 1,200 young high achievers, and concluded that many of the best and the brightest are not receiving the career development support they desire.  The article stated:

“Dissatisfaction with some employee-development efforts appears to fuel many early exits.  We asked young managers what their employers do to help them grow in their jobs and what they’d like their employers to do, and found some large gaps.  Workers reported that companies generally satisfy their needs for on-the-job development and that they value these opportunities, which include high-visibility positions and significant increases in responsibility.   But they’re not getting much in the way of formal development, such as training, mentoring and coaching – things they also value highly.”

Why is employee development a chronic problem, and why should it not be?  Based on several decades of my own management experience, following are three reasons why development planning is often ignored… and three  reasons why that’s a costly mistake.

Why is development planning frequently ignored?

1)  We tend to focus most on the here and now.   So many businesses are in a constant frenetic state of upheaval, reorganizations and trying to do more with less.   In this environment, managers naturally tend to be most focused on essential day-to-day operations and less interested in longer-term activities perceived as having less certain payback.

2) Some bureaucratic exercises are done but not acted upon.  When I was in corporate management, we spent a fair amount of time trying to fit employees into nearly incomprehensible matrices with too many descriptive boxes (“Intergalactic Star,” Diamond Amid Coal,” “Wolverine Tendencies,” “Wicked Lot of Problems” and so on – my own fanciful categories).  The problem was, the exercises were so confusing and time-consuming that we were satisfied just to complete them, and seldom did much constructive with the data.

3) There’s just no time for it.  This is (as those younger than I often put it) the “lamest” excuse of all.  There’s always time for important activities.  If you believe that development planning is a valuable managerial function,  just make it a priority and carve out the minutes and hours for it.

Why development planning makes good business sense.

1) People care if you take a genuine interest in their future.   Emphasis here on “genuine.”   Development planning should be something a manager takes a real personal interest in – not an HR-driven mandate.  (Note: I am a strong believer in the value a good solid HR organization brings to a company.  But I’m also opposed to making the simple needlessly complex.)

2) It helps builds loyalty, and loyalty increases productivity.  The logical corollary to point #1.  Taking an honest interest in someone builds loyalty.  Loyal employees are more engaged.  Engaged employees are more productive.

3) Good talented people naturally want to advance, and appreciate meaningful support in the process.  As the HBR study showed, capable ambitious young employees want training, mentoring and coaching.   They want to gain skills.  They want to become more versatile and valuable to an organization.  Many years ago my company invested heavily in my MBA, and it always meant a great deal to me.   Who doesn’t appreciate thoughtful support that helps you advance your own career?   But the flip side is, if one company doesn’t provide it, enterprising employees will go elsewhere for it.

One final thought: Development planning doesn’t have to be elaborate or costly.  At its core it’s mostly a matter of good managers taking the person-to-person time to understand their employees… recognizing their skills and needs… and guiding them to fill in the gaps.   If it’s done well, the payoff can be substantial in terms of long-term loyalty.   If it’s not, the costs can be substantial in terms of long-term talent.


Via Vilma Bonilla, Ivon Prefontaine
more...
Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, October 25, 2013 10:38 AM

"The study concluded that many of the best and brightest are not receiving the career development support they desire."

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 25, 2013 1:22 PM

This is a good article with some indepth consideration.

Rescooped by george_reed from Wise Leadership
Scoop.it!

Does power make you mean?

Does power make you mean? | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Research suggests that a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power. So promotions really do make us mean.

 

In one of the first studies to make this claim, scientists now say a default brain mechanism may cause us to lose empathy when we gain power...

 

Obhi and his team found feelings of increased powerfulness shut down our mirroring system -- and potentially our empathy -- through a default mechanism in our brains.

 

Liza Aziz-Zadeh, assistant professor at the University of Southern California, studies empathy from a neuroscience perspective and says the findings are interesting. "People who activate their mirroring system more, also score higher on empathy."

 

By Susanne Gargiulo, CNN


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain, Wise Leader™
more...
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:29 AM

Very interesting.  I especially like the following section:

 

"What we have found is that when people get power and move up, but don't understand how to relate, don't communicate well, and appear insensitive, cold, and authoritarian -- that ultimately derails their careers," he says.

 

This comes at an enormous cost in time, money, and morale to companies, he adds.

 

 

"In practical terms, this type of research may eventually be used and put together with training programs like mindfulness training and educational workshops for executives to deal with power better," says Obhi, but adds that we are only just beginning to understand the effects of power.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:08 PM

This is an interesting study. What about those who begin with little or no empathy?

Monique Nillessen's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:01 AM

Hopefully this study is wrong! So when you go up in the rankings, please practice empathy, to keep the standards up.

Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

13 Signs You're a Workplace Bully

13 Signs You're a Workplace Bully | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
The recent bullying case involving two Miami Dolphins football players makes it a good time to revisit bullying--or the potential for it--in your workplace.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

To All You Horrible Bosses Out There: Thanks For Inspiring Me to Move On

To All You Horrible Bosses Out There: Thanks For Inspiring Me to Move On | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
It was a simple list — a tribute to those who I adore because they helped me become the person I am today.
I thought about Kevin who honed my words early in my writing career. I thought about Al who shared life-lessons and wisdom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Creativity Through Abuse? It’s Simply the Dark Side of Leadership

Creativity Through Abuse? It’s Simply the Dark Side of Leadership | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
I came across this article from Pacific Standard magazine the other day and thought it was discussion worthy – and certainly a little controversial.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

How Do You Find and Keep Great People? Make Them Feel Special

How Do You Find and Keep Great People? Make Them Feel Special | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
The secret to employee retention is not to try and reinvent the wheel, but emulate the practices used by organizations that have been very successful at keeping their staff.
Two such organizations are Marriott Hotels and Southwest Airlines.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

The Value and Challenge of Complexity Science - AllAfrica.com

The Value and Challenge of Complexity Science - AllAfrica.com | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
The Value and Challenge of Complexity Science AllAfrica.com The book makes the case for more careful and consistent application of the same kind of scientific thinking that explained how embryos grow and galaxies die: complex adaptive systems...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons Introverts Make Better Leaders

5 Reasons Introverts Make Better Leaders | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Research shows that approximately 50 to 55 percent of American males are introverts. For females, that number is 47 to 55 percent.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Why Do Lindsay Lohan and Mel Gibson Misbehave?

Why Do Lindsay Lohan and Mel Gibson Misbehave? | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Why celebrities believe they are above the law.
george_reed's insight:

Not just rich kids. There is plendy of "exception-making" in the minds of those in positions of great power and responsibility who also sometimes thing they are beyond the reach of the rules. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

What Keeps Women Down? Gender and Leadership

What Keeps Women Down? Gender and Leadership | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Women face a double standard and a double bind.
george_reed's insight:

The good news, the situation is improving.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

How to Pick Your Battles at Work

How to Pick Your Battles at Work | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
You hate that people consistently show up to meetings late. You find your company’s maternity policy woefully inadequate. You think the company’s IT system is out of date.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Systems Blindness: The Illusion of Understanding

Systems Blindness: The Illusion of Understanding | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Here was the dilemma and opportunity for a major national retailer: its magazine buyers were reporting that close to 65 percent of all the magazines printed in the United States were never sold. This
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

How to Have an Awesome Work Career

How to Have an Awesome Work Career | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
4 steps to an awesome career.
george_reed's insight:

I always enjoy reading the observations and musings of Ron Riggio. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by george_reed
Scoop.it!

Center for Public Leadership - National Leadership Index

Center for Public Leadership - National Leadership Index | Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking | Scoop.it
Center for Public Leadership
george_reed's insight:

The US military is the sector that the American public has the most confidence in. Congress and Wall Street are at the bottom of the list. 

more...
No comment yet.