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10 Strategies To Reach The 21st Century Reader

10 Strategies To Reach The 21st Century Reader | Leadership in Education | Scoop.it
10 Strategies To Reach The 21st Century Reader by Terry Heick (Below are a few paragraphs of content–if you’re just here for the strategies, skim to the bottom.) Like thinking, reading in the 21st century...
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Why We're Learning about Coding in 6th Grade Writing Class | MiddleWeb

Why We're Learning about Coding in 6th Grade Writing Class | MiddleWeb | Leadership in Education | Scoop.it
If ELA students don't learn the basics of reading and writing computer code, asks Kevin Hodgson, how can we be sure they will grow up to be creators of ideas.
CJ Cammack's insight:

@jseroadrunners @MJHSBullpups 

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Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL | Leadership in Education | Scoop.it

At the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we've been keeping a list of the many types of "_____- based learning" we've run across over the years:

Case-based learningChallenge-based learningCommunity-based learningDesign-based learningGame-based learningInquiry-based learningLand-based learningPassion-based learningPlace-based learningProblem-based learningProficiency-based learningService-based learningStudio-based learningTeam-based learningWork-based learning. . . and our new fave . . .Zombie-based learning (look it up!)Let's Try to Sort This Out

The term "project learning" derives from the work of John Dewey and dates back to William Kilpatrick, who first used the term in 1918. At BIE, we see project-based learning as a broad category which, as long as there is an extended "project" at the heart of it, could take several forms or be a combination of:

Designing and/or creating a tangible product, performance or eventSolving a real-world problem (may be simulated or fully authentic)Investigating a topic or issue to develop an answer to an open-ended question

So according to our "big tent" model of PBL, some of the newer "X-BLs" -- problem-, challenge- and design-based -- are basically modern versions of the same concept. They feature, to varying degrees, all of BIE's 8 Essential Elements of PBL, although each has its own distinct flavor. (And by the way, each of these three, along with project-based learning, falls under the general category of inquiry-based learning -- which also includes research papers, scientific investigations, Socratic Seminars or other text-based discussions, etc. The other X-BLs might involve some inquiry, too, but now we're getting into the weeds . . .)

Other X-BLs are so named because they use a specific context for learning, such as a particular place or type of activity. They may contain projects within them, or have some of the 8 Essential Elements, but not necessarily. For example, within a community- or service-based learning experience, students may plan and conduct a project that improves their local community or helps the people in it, but they may also do other activities that are not part of a project. Conversely, students may learn content and skills via a game-based or work-based program that does not involve anything like what we would call a PBL-style project.

Problem-Based Learning vs. Project-Based Learning

Because they have the same acronym, we get a lot of questions about the similarities and differences between the two PBLs. We even had questions ourselves -- some years ago we created units for high school economics and government that we called "problem-based." But we later changed the name to "Project-Based Economics" and "Project-Based Government" to eliminate confusion about which PBL it was.

We decided to call problem-based learning a subset of project-based learning -- that is, one of the ways a teacher could frame a project is "to solve a problem." But problem-BL does have its own history and set of typically-followed procedures, which are more formally observed than in other types of projects. The use of case studies and simulations as "problems" dates back to medical schools in the 1960s, and problem-BL is still more often seen in the post-secondary world than in K-12, where project-BL is more common.

Problem-based learning typically follow prescribed steps:

Presentation of an "ill-structured" (open-ended, "messy") problemProblem definition or formulation (the problem statement)Generation of a "knowledge inventory" (a list of "what we know about the problem" and "what we need to know")Generation of possible solutionsFormulation of learning issues for self-directed and coached learningSharing of findings and solutions

If you're a project-BL teacher, this probably looks pretty familiar, even though the process goes by different names. Other than the framing and the more formalized steps in problem-BL, there's really not much conceptual difference between the two PBLs -- it’s more a question of style and scope:


Via Gordon Dahlby
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Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, January 10, 2014 12:23 PM

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I would have reversed the venn nature.  Problem-based is the superset...i.e. Problem to be solved.  Project is the subset.

Victoria Brandon's curator insight, January 18, 2014 4:48 PM

Project Based Learning allows students to learn how to become problem solvers. 

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The EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic | e-Learning ...

The EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic | e-Learning ... | Leadership in Education | Scoop.it
The Must-Have EdTech Cheat Sheet for Teachers Infographic.
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