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26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates | Social Media Examiner

26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates | Social Media Examiner | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

Are you struggling to find ideas for posts on Twitter, Facebook and Google+?


Do you need to come up with additional social media updates?


Even seasoned social media marketers can find it difficult to keep up with the demand for fresh content.In this article you’ll discover 26 (A to Z style) prompts to help you deliver a never-ending supply of social media updates....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 30, 11:10 AM

Content marketing gets easier these 26 tips Social Media Examiner.

Laura Saavedra's curator insight, August 31, 2:40 PM

I like this one!

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Innovation Excellence | Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Education

Innovation Excellence | Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Education | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

Don Wettrick is on a mission: revolutionizing the world of #education by #training the next generation of innovators.


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Apple reportedly plans to unveil the iWatch alongside the iPhone 6 on September 9

Apple reportedly plans to unveil the iWatch alongside the iPhone 6 on September 9 | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
APPLE will now reportedly unveil its long-awaited smartwatch alongside of two new iPhone 6 models on September 9.

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8 Qualities That Make Great Bosses Unforgettable

8 Qualities That Make Great Bosses Unforgettable | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
I remember all of my bosses. Some were bad. Most were good.But only one was, in the best possible way, truly memorable.Unforgettable bosses possess qualities that may not show up on paper but always

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11 Overused Terms in Modern Marketing That Need to be Retired

11 Overused Terms in Modern Marketing That Need to be Retired | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

You really need to stop using these phrases.

 

Some are blatantly self-inflating, some are too vague for their own good, and others just sound downright disgusting.x

 

We’re all familiar with those wrung out, miserably overused industry terms that have been leeched of their original potency.

 

They’re the ones repeatedly (and often inaccurately) applied to such a broad variety of subjects and situations that they’ve taken on undesirable connotations as a result.

 

And they’re the words I’m now promoting replacements for in an effort to abolish their exhausting reign over modern marketing discourse....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 28, 4:51 AM

Marketing malaprops begone!

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Meet the Company Google just bought to Design its Future

Meet the Company Google just bought to Design its Future | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
Today, Google announced it's taking a big step into its future: By buying Gecko Design, an 18-year-old product design and mechanical engineering studio, to be part of Google X. What could Google want with a smaller engineering company like Gecko? Its ability to build real-world products, that's what.

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Sílvia Dias's curator insight, August 23, 5:06 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

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7 ways to Write a Killer Press Release

7 ways to Write a Killer Press Release | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
When you write a press release you're working for the journalists, not for the company that you're trying to promote.

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Progressive training's curator insight, August 19, 3:44 AM

7 ways to Write a Killer Press Release

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The Collaborative Economy APIs Mean Changes to Commerce | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

The Collaborative Economy APIs Mean Changes to Commerce | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

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Study of 2.6 Billion Shares Reveals Which Platforms and Publishers Dominate Social

Study of 2.6 Billion Shares Reveals Which Platforms and Publishers Dominate Social | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

The number of shares an article receives has become ubiquitous in online content; widgets that show shares, tweets, pins, and +1s appear front and center on nearly every post you read (or, in this case, just to the left of this paragraph).

 

Just how many times does content get shared? Where do people prefer to share it? And are some publishers more effective than others at generating highly shared content? These questions are crucial to content marketers looking to understand the key components of a viral marketing success, and our recent research collaboration with BuzzSumo is here to give you some answers....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 21, 11:41 PM

Kelsey Libert shares valuable insight into what makes content most shareable.

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10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq

10 free tools for creating infographics | Creative Bloq | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

...The only problem is, infographics that look like they were simple to make are often anything but. Creating something beautiful and instantly understandable in Photoshop is often beyond the limits that time allows. Which is why it's occasionally useful to use a quick and dirty infographics tool to speed up the process.


We've selected our favourites here. They're all free, or offer free versions. Let us know which ones you get on best with...


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JBass Learning's curator insight, August 21, 6:50 PM

Some really useful looking tools 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 22, 4:26 AM

I know nothing about this but it looks like a good starting point...:-)))

Luis Cano's curator insight, August 23, 4:02 PM

Herramientas de Infograficas ...

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How Design Thinking Transformed Airbnb from a Failing Startup to a Billion Dollar Business

How Design Thinking Transformed Airbnb from a Failing Startup to a Billion Dollar Business | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
In 2009, Airbnb was close to going bust. Like so many startups, they had launched but barely anyone noticed. The company’s revenue was flatlined at $200 per week.

 Split between three young founders living in San Francisco, this meant near indefinite losses on zero growth. As everyone knows, venture investors look for companies that show hockey stick graphs, and according to co-founder Joe Gebbia, his company had a horizontal drumstick graph. The team was forced to max out their credit cards.

It's Okay to Do Things That Don’t Scale

At the time, Airbnb was part of Y Combinator. One afternoon, the team was poring over their search results for New York City listings with Paul Graham, trying to figure out what wasn’t working, why they weren’t growing. After spending time on the site using the product, Gebbia had a realization. “We noticed a pattern. There's some similarity between all these 40 listings. The similarity is that the photos sucked. The photos were not great photos. People were using their camera phones or using their images from classified sites.  It actually wasn't a surprise that people weren't booking rooms because you couldn't even really see what it is that you were paying for.”

Graham tossed out a completely non-scalable and non-technical solution to the problem: travel to New York, rent a camera, spend some time with customers listing properties, and replace the amateur photography with beautiful high-resolution pictures. The three-man team grabbed the next flight to New York and upgraded all the amateur photos to beautiful images. There wasn’t any data to back this decision originally. They just went and did it. A week later, the results were in: improving the pictures doubled the weekly revenue to $400 per week. This was the first financial improvement that the company had seen in over eight months. They knew they were onto something.

This was the turning point for the company. Gebbia shared that the team initially believed that everything they did had to be ‘scalable.’ It was only when they gave themselves permission to experiment with non-scalable changes to the business that they climbed out of what they called the ‘trough of sorrow.’

“We had this Silicon Valley mentality that you had to solve problems in a scalable way because that's the beauty of code. Right? You can write one line of code that can solve a problem for one customer, 10,000 or 10 million. For the first year of the business, we sat behind our computer screens trying to code our way through problems. We believed this was the dogma of how you're supposed to solve problems in Silicon Valley. It wasn't until our first session with Paul Graham at Y Combinator where we basically… the first time someone gave us permission to do things that don't scale, and it was in that moment, and I'll never forget it because it changed the trajectory of the business”


Why Designers Need to ‘Become the Patient’ to Build Better Products

Gebbia’s experience with upgrading photographs proved that code alone can’t solve every problem that customers have. While computers are powerful, there’s only so much that software alone can achieve. Silicon Valley entrepreneurs tend to become comfortable in their roles as keyboard jockeys. However, going out to meet customers in the real world is almost always the best way to wrangle their problems and come up with clever solutions. 

Gebbia went on to share how an early design school experience also shaped his thinking about customer development, “If we were working on a medical device, we would go out into the world. We would go talk with all of the stakeholders, all of the users of that product, doctors, nurses, patients and then we would have that epiphany moment where we would lay down in the bed in the hospital. We'd have the device applied to us, and we would sit there and feel exactly what it felt like to be the patient, and it was in that moment where you start to go aha, that's really uncomfortable. There's probably a better way to do this.” This experience pushed Gebbia to make ‘being a patient’ a core value of their design team.

The desire to always be the patient is immediately felt by all new team members. “Everybody takes a trip in their first or second week in the company and then they document it. We have some structured questions that they answer and then they actually share back to the entire company. It's incredibly important that everyone in the company knows that we believe in this so much, we're going to pay for you to go take a trip on your first week.”

Let People Be Pirates


While Airbnb is data driven, they don’t let data push them around. Instead of developing reactively to metrics, the team often starts with a creative hypothesis, implements a change, reviews how it impacts the business and then repeats that process.

Gebbia shares, "I'm not sure how useful data is if you don't have meaningful scale to test it against. It may be misleading. The way that we do things is that if we have an idea for something, we now kind of build it into the culture of this idea that it is okay to do something that doesn't scale. You go be a pirate, venture into the world and get a little test nugget, and come back and tell us the story that you found."


Individual team members at Airbnb make small bets on new features, and then measure if there’s a meaningful return on the bet.  If there’s a payoff, they send more pirates in that direction. This structure encourages employees to take measured, productive risks on behalf of the company that can lead to the development of major new features. It allows Airbnb to move quickly and continually find new opportunities.

“We’re trying to create an environment where people can see a glimmer of something and basically throw dynamite on it and blow it up to become something bigger than anyone could have ever imagined.”

Everyone Learns to Ship On Day One

As part of the onboarding process at Airbnb, the company encourages new employees to ship new features on their first day at the company. It earns them their sea legs and shows that great ideas can come from anywhere. This approach yields results in unexpected ways. For example, one Airbnb designer was assigned what seemed like the small task of reevaluating the “star” function. In the original Airbnb product, users could ‘star’ properties to add them to a wish list — a basic feature. Gebbia recounts the story:

“Our new designer comes back and says I have it. I go what do you mean you have it? You only spent the day on it. He goes, well, I think the stars are the kinds of things you see in utility-driven experiences. He explained our service is so aspirational. Why don't we tap into that? He goes I'm going to change that to a heart. I go, wow, okay. It's interesting, and we can ship it so we did. When we ship it, we put code in it so we can track it and see how behavior changed.”

Sure enough, the simple change from a star to a heart increased engagement by over 30%. In short, let people be pirates, ship stuff and try new things.

Parting Words

When you’re building product at a startup you’re always moving a million miles an hour. It’s tough. You need to ship. Gebbia tries to balance this reality with the need to think in new ways by constantly pushing his team to think bigger. He notes, “Anytime somebody comes to me with something, my first instinct when I look at it is to think bigger. That's my instinctual piece of advice. Think bigger. Whatever it is, blow it out of proportion and see where that takes you. Come back to me when you've thought about that times 100. Show me what that looks like."



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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 8, 7:25 AM

This is very significant. Never lose touch with your client. Look at things differently, from many angles, and try to see through the eyes of your client.

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Marketplace Startups Are Eating Entire Industries

Marc Andreessen famously said a few years ago that “software is eating the world.” While that very well may be true, it is now quite commonplace for marketplace companies to eat entire industries. What is a marketplace company? It’s a platform that connects buyers and sellers of a specific product or service. These companies tend to challenge the status quo of an industry, sometimes finding great success as well as controversy.

Take Airbnb for example. Before the advent of the short term stay Stalwart, limited options existed in the market for both buyers and sellers. If you traveled you had to stay at a hotel or call a friend. If you wanted to lease your place, you had to. Despite generating controversy over the years due to renter security and legal liabilities, Airbnb has created an entirely new market and is now challenging the entire hotel industry.

Marketplace companies have numerous unfair advantages. By directing existing market demand to new sources of supply, like individuals’ homes in the Airbnb example above, platforms undercut traditional incumbents in regards to pricing and unique experiences. Customers love them because often these services are on-demand and provide a delightful experience. Investors like them because they are easily scalable despite controversies and are asset-light businesses.

The category is growing. Marketplace startups are finding users and starting to attract investor attention. Bill Gurley from Benchmark said he likes the opportunity to appeal to millennials on mobile and Aileen Lee from Cowboy said she likes the social proof these marketplaces provide as an embedded network effect. Here are some of the more innovative “industry eaters” out there right now.

Homejoy

Founded by Adora and Aaron Cheung in 2012, Homejoy works to make cleaning services available to a broader audience. Through their quick and easy to use platform, a customer can hire a certified cleaner at an affordable price, providing the customer with more free time in their day and creating thousands of job opportunities for cleaners. Before Homejoy, one had to take the time to look for, interview, and hire a cleaner while paying a high cost for the service. Homejoy’s marketplace function displaces traditional home cleaning.

When it was founded in 2012, the company only served the San Francisco Bay Area. Today, it serves over 30 cities in the United States and Canada and continues to grow. Investors include Google GOOGL -0.91% Ventures and Y Combinator and the company has received about $40 Million in total investments. Customers rave about how easy it is to use the platform, the professionalism of the cleaners, and the low cost. “The price is really great compared to most of the services out there,” says Amanda Bloom a customer of the service in San Francisco. “And I love that I can take care of all of my appointment booking online.” It’s no wonder people are excited about this company’s future.

Traction

Launching out of Y Combinator, Traction makes it possible for companies to outsource their marketing team. This new marketplace connects brands and advertisers with media buyers, social media experts, content marketers, and bloggers who can run and execute digital marketing campaigns and distribute content. Founders hope to disrupt the traditional agency model by providing on-demand marketing services from some of the world’s best digital marketers.

Because of its function, Traction’s ability to gain, well, traction has been significant. Brands like Sony , Kraft, Danone and CBS have all signed up for it after just a few months of business.  This has allowed the company to grow at 80 percent month over month.

The current marketing landscape is full of inefficiencies,” says Traction CEO and Founder Ken Zi Wang. “By focusing on metrics only, we give brands a leg up.” Customers seem to agree. “I have worked with a good deal of startups including Y Combinator companies before but I have never seen a company as effective at acquiring fortune 100 companies as customers. This is clearly attributable to them solving a deep pain point in today’s marketing world,” said Lou Paik Marketing Manager for Danone.

Instacart

San Francisco-based Instacart is a grocery delivery service that can deliver orders in as little as an hour. Founded in 2012, the company provides a platform through which customers can specify everything about their order, from where they want their groceries to be bought to how ripe they want their produce. Instacart then connects customers to shoppers who purchase and deliver the groceries. Their fastest delivery took only 12 minutes! The company is disrupting grocery stores’ home delivery service, which tends to be slower and less customizable, as you can’t get certain foods from certain stores.

Since 2012, the company has grown very fast and now serves 11 of the largest urban areas in the United States. The team plans to have that number up to 15 cities by the end of 2015. The company has raised approximately $55 Million from investors including Andreessen Horowitz, Khosla Ventures, and Y Combinator. These investments have come on top of huge growth in the company’s revenue, which has gone up 15x since September 2013. “The main reason I love Instacart is that it’s super convenient,” says Stacy Fried, a Boston customer. “The only grocery stores in our area that deliver are Whole Foods, Costco, and Safeway.”

Many marketplace companies are growing at a breakneck pace right now. The companies in this article are just a sample of what’s out there. Despite regulatory hurdles for some firms in the marketplace arena, it’s likely that more of these platforms will find success in the way of more users and investment. As technology progresses, we can expect more industries to be “eaten” by companies in this category.



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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 13, 7:59 AM

What industry will you take on?

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8 Ways to Use Google Analytics to Measure the Success of Your Content Marketing | Orbit Media Studios

8 Ways to Use Google Analytics to Measure the Success of Your Content Marketing | Orbit Media Studios | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

In the world of content, too many marketers burden themselves with the “more is better” mentality. Create as much content as possible and that’s how the world (and Google) will find you.

 

On the other hand, what if you could create better content, more often?In order to help guide you, here are 8 different ways to use Google Analytics to help you not only ask the right questions, but also navigate through the various reports to find the answers. For the most part, these are in order of easiest to hardest as far as GA-savviness....


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Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, August 14, 11:01 AM

8 Ways to Use Google Analytics to Measure the Success of Your Content Marketing

Jakarta Web Developer's curator insight, August 14, 11:02 AM

8 Ways to Use Google Analytics to Measure the Success of Your Content Marketing

Miami Marketing Tools's curator insight, August 14, 4:50 PM

Very interesting article about how to use Google analytics to meassure how well your online content is doing. 

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Face Recognition Payment App Unveiled in China

Face Recognition Payment App Unveiled in China | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
Face-recognition software could change the face of shopping say academics

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Matt Archer's curator insight, August 31, 8:21 PM

Is your face going to be the new credit card of the future?  When you think of the impact that the google glass type product is likely to have on the world, this becomes something worth keeping an eye on.

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How the Internet Saved Handmade Goods | Harvard Business Review

How the Internet Saved Handmade Goods | Harvard Business Review | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

A recent article in The Economist, citing the work of Ryan Raffaelli at Harvard Business School, points to what it calls a “paradox” in the aftermath of disruptive innovation.


Some old technologies, after being rendered obsolete by better and cheaper alternatives (indeed even after whole industries based on them have been decimated), manage to “re-emerge” to the point that they sustain healthy businesses. Think mechanical Swiss watches, now enjoying strong sales. Or fountain pens, or vinyl records. Or small-batch, handmade goods — from vermouth to chocolate to pickles.


We could add our own favorite example: pinball. In our HBR article “Big Bang Disruption”, we describe the devastation of arcade pinball machines wrought in only a few years by Sony’s PlayStation home video console. From a historic high in 1993 of 130,000 machines sold, sales fell over 90% in the next five years. By the end of the decade, only one producer—Stern Pinball—was left making new machines, and with arcades closing daily, it looked as if it, too, would soon be facing game over....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, September 1, 3:33 AM

The Internet. The same technologies that destroyed them brought them back.

OXY GREY's curator insight, September 1, 4:25 AM

Quand Internet réinvente ce qu'il avait annihilé il y a quelques années ou comment Internet a relancé l'industrie artisanale du "fait-main"

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This LA Billionaire Is Reinventing Your Health Care

This LA Billionaire Is Reinventing Your Health Care | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
SANTA MONICA, Calif. –- You have been diagnosed with lung cancer.

There is a bewildering array of drugs, and combinations of drugs, that may shrink the tumor and prolong your life. Or they could make matters worse and give you terrible side ...

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Why Silicon Valley Will Continue to Rule the Tech Economy

Why Silicon Valley Will Continue to Rule the Tech Economy | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Michael S. Malone says that human talent and research and design labs are arriving to dominate the new era of devices.

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Here's One Way Apple's Smartwatch could be Better than anything Else

Here's One Way Apple's Smartwatch could be Better than anything Else | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
This could be a game changer.

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50 Of Best Apple’s Siri, Microsoft’s Cortana & Google Now Voice Commands

50 Of Best Apple’s Siri, Microsoft’s Cortana & Google Now Voice Commands | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
The concept of personal assistants has been around for a long, long time, and they indeed make one’s job a lot easier by sharing a hefty amount of your workload, maintaining schedules, prioritizing stuff, keeping track of projects and whatnot. With advancements in technology, a lot of that responsibility has shifted to our smartphones, further supported by the fact that not everyone can afford (or is entitled to) a personal assistant. Apple took the concept to the virtual world with its implementation of Siri, followed closely by Google Now and now, Microsoft’s Cortana for Windows Phone, with the latter being the highlight these days.

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deannabrown's curator insight, August 25, 2:05 PM

We love when tech helps us 'HANDS FREE"

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15 Super Smart Google Search Tricks

15 Super Smart Google Search Tricks | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

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Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, August 21, 10:43 AM

Love lifehack!

Jim White's curator insight, August 21, 12:23 PM

More great business tools.

GestionBarrette's curator insight, August 22, 6:46 AM

Usefull for any manager, ...  anyone using a computer in fact.  

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Stop Reading and Start Learning: How to Absorb Information Better

Stop Reading and Start Learning: How to Absorb Information Better | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

There is no shortage of material that needs to be read in business including marketing copy, business plans, contracts legal documents and of course business books. I love to read but not all business reading is particularly entertaining or well written. And some of the most important stuff is dense, dry and dreadful no matter how much achieving success requires you read it.


So when my inbox is full of necessary reading that I know will put me to sleep, I have to make a special effort to power through it. First, I set aside time with no distractions. No phone, email or TV to draw my focus. Then I find a place with lots of natural light. Lastly I turn on mellow music that I know well so I can get into rhythmic groove. Before you know it the stack is gone and I feel better for having been productive.


Here are more ways to tackle that tough material from my Inc. colleagues.


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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 21, 6:35 PM

Business is full of dry boring material that needs your attention. Here Inc. columnists share ways to get through the drudgery.

Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, August 22, 12:20 AM

Deja de leer y comienza a aprender!.

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Age and Gender Matter in Viral Marketing

Age and Gender Matter in Viral Marketing | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

To gain better insight into what makes people share content online, Fractl studied the emotions associated with viral marketing campaigns, plotting the ones that are most commonly associated with viral content on Robert Plutchik’s comprehensive Wheel of Emotions:


CuriosityAmazementInterestAstonishmentUncertainty


Then, we looked more closely to see how certain demographics respond to different types of content.


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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 20, 6:59 PM

Nearly every digital marketer has a goal of creating a viral campaign. Getting mass exposure for high-quality content provides huge value to clients, but it’s not always easy to pull off; it takes an understanding of the complexity of human emotion and how it plays into consuming and sharing content online.

Kay Summers's curator insight, August 21, 4:21 AM

Capturing Attention can be hard

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Google Glass' new features let you switch chat methods on a whim

Google Glass' new features let you switch chat methods on a whim | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it
Some of Google's rapid-fire Glass updates have been more useful than others, but its latest is something you're likely to appreciate -- especially if you're a socialite.

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Google Ventures Enters European Venture Capital Market | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Google Ventures Enters European Venture Capital Market | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

The recently-announced advent of Google Ventures Europe is set to bring extra resources to the European innovation ecosystem but the firm will need to address the European market as a whole if it wants to make the most of the opportunities available.

The EY barometer reported that in 2013 venture capital investments in the United States amounted to $33 billion, compared with $7.4 billion in Europe. While this figure represented a 19% rise in the volume of European deals versus 2012, the ‘Old Continent’ is clearly lagging well behind. Now the recent announcement that Google Ventures, a venture capital firm belonging to Google which was launched in 2009, is coming to Europe and will open an office in London, could have a significant impact on the innovation ecosystem in Europe, but it remains to be seen whether the new entrant will be able to take advantage of opportunities across the continent.

New player in the European ecosystem

Bernard-Louis Roques, General Partner at Paris-based Truffle Capital, an independent European private equity firm originally set up to invest in spin-offs from companies active in, among other fields, the Information Technologies sector, believes that the arrival of Google Ventures Europe will have a positive impact since “there’s certainly a shortage of finance, so companies go and look for it abroad or sell off the business. It’s encouraging that Google thinks Europe has a strong role to play in the innovation ecosystem.” Google Ventures has no ambitions to come in and shake up the venture capital business in Europe, but intends to invest in companies that offer new innovation opportunities. In the company’s official Press Release, Google Ventures cites the examples of successful European startups such as SoundCloud, an online audio distribution platform based in Berlin, and digital music service Spotify, which demonstrate the ″enormous potential″ of Europe’s startup scene.  Meanwhile Roques sees Google’s strategy as “a way of having a presence in the native European ecosystem and being perceived as a local player.”

Only UK or the wider Europe to benefit?

Google Ventures Europe will begin with startup capital of $100 million, which seems rather a limited budget if Google is planning to seek investments across Europe as a whole. In fact Google Ventures is going to open its European office in East London close to the UK’s ‘Silicon Roundabout’. The Truffle Capital director points out that many US investment funds that are interested in Europe very often go to the UK, where there are both strong geographical links with the US and a highly favourable tax regime. As far as Bernard-Louis Roques is concerned it would not really make sense to set up an office in Paris as there would be no tax advantages. Nevertheless the fear must be that as Google Ventures Europe will be based in London, the company might neglect the rest of the continent.



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Security App Lookout Attracts $150 Million in Venture Capital

Security App Lookout Attracts $150 Million in Venture Capital | Leadership and Talent Development | Scoop.it

Lookout, a seven-year-old mobile security company in San Francisco, is riding a wave of concern over cyberthreats, with 50 million people using its security app.

Now, the company has raised a fresh haul of venture capital from some major financial firms.

Lookout announced on Wednesday that it had attracted $150 million from investors led by T. Rowe Price Associates. Other investors include Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley Investment Management, the Wellington Management Company and Bezos Expeditions, the personal investment fund of Jeffrey P. Bezos of Amazon.

A number of previous investors in the company – including the venture capital firms Andreessen Horowitz, Accel Partners, Khosla Ventures, Index Ventures and Mithril Capital Management, which was founded by Peter Thiel – also participated.

The presence of T. Rowe Price and Morgan Stanley Investment Management, two firms that serve wealthy individuals, could indicate that Lookout is at a mature stage. Young technology companies, when they are gearing up for an initial public offering, like to accept investments from such firms because they are seen as long-term investors that will not immediately sell shares in an I.P.O.

“These are very long-term, patient investors who are here to help us in building a multidecade franchise,” said John Hering, the co-founder and executive chairman of Lookout, who until recently was the chief executive.

Lookout hired its current chief executive, Jim Dolce, in March. Mr. Dolce, a Silicon Valley veteran, previously founded four technology companies, including one that was acquired by Juniper Networks and another that was bought by Akamai Technologies.

Mr. Dolce said that while Lookout had made inroads with individuals and some small businesses, he now hoped to convince large companies to sign up and put their employees on the service, especially given that more companies allow employees to use their own mobile devices for business.

The new capital will help the company develop new products and expand its sales team, as it tries to crack the large business market, Mr. Dolce said.

“This financing, especially given its size, is a testament to what we’re doing here,” he said.

For venture capitalists, Lookout has several promising sectors of growth. Its software is delivered over the cloud on a subscription basis, providing a predictable stream of revenue. It is also focused on mobile devices, which many technology experts see as the future of computing.

Most important, it appeals to consumers and companies worried about malware, viruses and other threats. The app says it can block malicious websites as well as check which other apps are using a consumer’s private information. And it includes a service to help consumers recover a lost or stolen phone.

In the United States, Lookout has partnered with AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint, which offer the service to their customers. It also works with major mobile companies in Germany, France and Britain.

With the latest financing, Lookout has raised a combined $280 million. Allen & Company was the adviser on the latest financing round.

 

 

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Via Marc Kneepkens
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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 16, 9:48 AM

Security problems are huge, the money invested proves that.