Leadership and Spirituality
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Leadership and Spirituality
What role does spirituality play in leadership? It makes the leader whole and fill the hole in the whole of the organization
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Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it? - SmartCompany.com.au

Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it? - SmartCompany.com.au | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it?
SmartCompany.com.au
Currently neuroscience has become the dominant theme in emotional intelligence.

Via Wise Leader™, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Will we be able to measure it? Or will it be something that we recognize as the quality of organizations improves?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 17, 2013 3:16 PM

Great question to ponder.  Your thoughts?

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'70% Disengagement' - 3 Ways To Engage Those Who Aren't

'70% Disengagement' - 3 Ways To Engage Those Who Aren't | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
When leaders are committed and actively working to connect, inspire and embolden – they raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organisation contributes to all its stakeholders.

Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is build trust.

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10 Ways You're Killing Your Credibility

10 Ways You're Killing Your Credibility | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Credibility is everything in the business world. It's hard to build but easy to destroy. And your success depends on it.

Via Steve Black, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I experience dishonesty in many forms on a daily basis. It is like people think we do not know. The question is: why are they dishonest?

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John Michel's curator insight, June 14, 2013 5:31 AM

Credibility is a powerful thing, not just because it has so much impact on your future, but also because you have so much control over it. With rare exception, it's more or less in your hands. And here are the biggest pitfalls you need to avoid.

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16 Harsh Truths That Will Make You Stronger, Smarter & More Powerful

16 Harsh Truths That Will Make You Stronger, Smarter & More Powerful | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Life, as we all know, is a series of games of many forms. It is a game of will, a game of speed and a game of wit as well. One thing is for sure, neither of these are in any way simple to understand or overcome. If only we were informed of this abundance of compromising situations earlier.

Throughout our young lives we have always been sheltered by school, lied to by our older peers and were always told that if we do x y and z that everything will just work out with no resistance whatsoever.

Of course, as we get older and graduate from college, we soon realize that the real world bears some harsh truths that some of us are no necessarily ready for. The real world is a cold place that can crumble a person and break them down within seconds.

It’s there to work against you, not with you. Still, it is ultimately up to you as to how you handle this clash of wills and how to make sure you and only you are in charge of what happens to you. Accepting these harsh truths and formulating a game plan to adapt to them and end up on top will greatly assist you in your ability to roll with all the punches life throws at you, we assure you that much.


Via The Learning Factor, Tom Hood
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to know these truths to learn resiliency.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, June 14, 2013 7:32 AM

Great advice for young professionals (and even us seasoned profesisonals), it is really about taking responsibility and thinking about adding more valus than you cost evey day!

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Restorative Yoga: Supported Seated Twist - Power of Positivity - Positive News, Inspiration, Wellness, Spirituality

Restorative Yoga: Supported Seated Twist - Power of Positivity - Positive News, Inspiration, Wellness, Spirituality | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Restorative yoga is a beautiful style of yoga that’s both powerful and gentle. It’s a practice of passively BEing, rather than actively DOing. Deeply...

Via Laurie Buchanan, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Yoga has helped immensely.

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Where Does Identity Come From?: Scientific American

Where Does Identity Come From?: Scientific American | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
A fascinating new neuroscience experiment probes an ancient philosophical question—and hints that you might want to get out more

Via FastTFriend, Swati Lahiri M.Ed (Curriculum Design)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Who we are is hard to measure and research, but it is important to seek the questions, if not the answers.

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FastTFriend's curator insight, June 1, 2013 10:40 AM

Regardless of these specifics, this experiment is a potent reminder that our lives are a work in progress. If we’re indeed living out a kind of tape, then it seems to be one in which the tracks can be tweaked as they’re read, even if they’re rather deep. As your brain is shaped by the choices you make, there is room for chance and noise – room for you to be unique.

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Reflections on Teaching: Learning from our Stories | Faculty Focus

Reflections on Teaching: Learning from our Stories | Faculty Focus | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

By Maryellen Weimer

 

"Here's a great story. A graduate student is attending a lecture being given by one of her intellectual heroes, the Brazilian educator and theorist Paulo Freire. She takes notes furiously, trying to capture as many of his words as possible. Seeing that she is keenly interested in what Freire had to say, his translator asks if she would like to meet him. Of course! She is introduced and he begins by inquiring about her work. Then he graciously agrees to respond to a set of questions she and her colleagues hoped they would get the chance to ask him. She is impressed beyond belief, but time prevents her from asking one last, difficult question. They meet accidently once more at the event and he wonders if she asked all her questions? No, there is one more. "Given your work, we want to know 'where is the hope'?" Without hesitating he moves toward her, takes her face in his hands, looks into her eyes, and replies, "You tell them, 'you are the hope, because theory needs to be reinvented, not replicated ... it is a guide. We make history as we move through it and that is the hope."


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Theory needs to be reinvented (or reimagined) not replicated.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:27 AM

This story introduces a review of a book titled "What Our Stories Teach Us: A Guide to Critical Reflection for College Faculty". It is a heartfelt review and seems like a wonderful book. And I certainly like the story Weimer selected to write about.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 12, 2013 10:04 AM

the difference between a theory and a new theory!

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Brain Can Be Trained in Compassion | Neuroscience News

Brain Can Be Trained in Compassion | Neuroscience News | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Using neuroimaging technology, researchers note increased activity in areas of the brain associated with empathy in subjects who underwent compassion training.

Via Dionne, Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Definitely worth reading and following up on the research.

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If You Keep Going For Perfection, You May Never Take Any Action! | SmartChic

If You Keep Going For Perfection, You May Never Take Any Action! | SmartChic | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Keep Going For Perfection, You May Never Take Any Action

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to set realistic goals in life and understand there are times we cannot achieve them. Realistic includes resiliency.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 8, 2013 5:56 AM

A fine article to reflect upon this weekend.

 

(From the article): So I hope my story shows you, if you keep striving for ‘perfection’ it may lead to inaction!  So keep these things in mind:

Strive for excellence, not for perfection. *No one is perfect!Realize you will make mistakes.  Make adjustments along the way.No more waiting. No more hesitating. Take action today!
Anne-Laure Delpech's curator insight, June 8, 2013 6:26 AM

intéressant pour chacun de nous. 

Carolyn Williams's curator insight, June 8, 2013 3:31 PM

I do! ;)  

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Fear Consumes, Joy Builds Capacity | I was thinking…

Fear Consumes, Joy Builds Capacity | I was thinking… | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Via Chris Wejr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Children need to know adults are there for them and to help them.

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Chris Wejr's curator insight, June 7, 2013 9:33 AM
Looking at children's through the lens of inquiry... Asking questions and seeking to understand.
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Empathy Without Boundaries - New York Times (blog)

Empathy Without Boundaries - New York Times (blog) | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Empathy Without Boundaries
New York Times (blog)
Jean McFee Raichle, 94, is a remarkably cheerful woman. She lives in an assisted living center in Seattle staffed by aides who are warm and nurturing.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need more empathy in our daily llves.

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:28 PM

Emotional contagion is problematic.  

 

"“If we are calm, we can bring people with dementia to a calm place,” he said. “And if we are anxious, we can amp people up.”"


Staying calm is vital.  

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The Third Decade of Emotional Intelligence - Six Seconds

The Third Decade of Emotional Intelligence - Six Seconds | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence was discovered in the 1990s. The value was proven in the 2000s. What will happen in this third decade with the science and practice of emotional intelligence?

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I still do not see much happening. Educators seem to be relying on quick fix and faddish approaches.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 6, 2013 4:22 PM

Six seconds, three decades, infinite possibilities...

John Michel's curator insight, June 6, 2013 5:41 PM

More proof of the power of EQ in our lives.

Pavel Barta's comment, June 7, 2013 5:07 AM
I worked at higher education in the past and now I am a full time MBA student - well ranked business school - but let me tell you. We still have a long way to go! ... lots of talk, but very little happening on the ground. So lets do something about it :-)
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The View Inside Me

The View Inside Me - Inside Edge for Entrepreneurs. The blog for high performance entrepreneurs by Marc Winn.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When someone writes about trust, and I read a recent article on it by someone I worked with, and treats it as a cognitive exercise this is problematic.

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The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz

The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need quiet time to meditate, contemplate, or pray. It does not make a difference what we call it. We need it.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 13, 2013 2:23 PM

After reading this speech once, I realize these are the words I would have read to my past self in high school and again during my first days in college, and then again at the end of college at graduation. I would try to read them to my children at their different points in life (in person or as a digital avatar). There are powerful messages in this lecture delivered at West Point. He talks about leadership and what it means to be a leader, but he also explains how leadership and isolation play off of each other. He talks about how true leadership can be lonely and isolating, but also how loneliness and isolation can help you to become a better leader, a better thinker, a better human being. These include the abilities of a true leader: The ability to speak your mind even when you know what you are sharing is not held by the majority of those you are addressing; the ability to think critically, skeptically, and to adjust your perspectives to test and validate (or invalidate) a position, a solution, and even the questions asked of a problem, is valuable and rare. Maybe it's valuable because it's so rare. Or maybe it's so valuable because it isn't often appreciated at the time, like a work of great art or an invention that can't be commercialized. My favorite point was when he said, “So it’s perfectly natural to have doubts, or questions, or even just difficulties. The question is, what do you do with them? Do you suppress them, do you distract yourself from them, do you pretend they don’t exist? Or do you confront them directly, honestly, courageously? If you decide to do so, you will find that the answers to these dilemmas are not to be found on Twitter or Comedy Central or even in The New York Times. They can only be found within—without distractions, without peer pressure, in solitude.”

 

I don't agree that there is no leadership in many areas, many departments. I don't know how the author/speaker has come to those conclusions, considering his experiences and intelligence. Usually, people think they are being profound when they say there are no leaders, no poets, no great artists, etc. It's actually a sign that they lack imagination or real experience leading or creating. It's like saying we need to end poverty or hunger; saying it as if no body is trying to achieve these goals. Meanwhile, there are organizations plugging away, resisting, innovating, reaching, and achieving these goals...but at lower levels, lower numbers, temporarily. But he is not that guy. So, I value his speech and his ultimate points and reasoning and advice, but disagree on some points.

 

But leadership has changed, which is often unappreciated often. The “boss” is becoming ineffective. How do people realize that 21st century learning rejects lecturing and “top down” command structure and the “sage on the stage” but think leaders should still lecture and command from up-high? What is leadership in a world of complexity? Authority has changed. Hierarchies are collapsing, becoming lattices and noded-networks. Power and warfare include informality (informal power) and unorthodoxy (innovative).  Temporary teams focus on short term projects and objectives.

The more informed, intelligent, and experienced commentator should explain how leadership has changed. But that’s not what complainers do. They don’t talk about complexity, complications, and wicked problems. They sound like apologists. They appear weak and confused and bureaucratic. The eyes of the audience will go glassy. But what do we know about leadership from Star Trek? Was Captain Kirk a better leader than Jean Luc Picard? How do you evaluate Mission Impossible of today? I wonder if people still want Clint Eastwood types. In the Game of Thrones, we are introduced to different kinds of leaders and different kinds of heroes. I wonder who is best, most heroic, and more effective at leading.

We say we want better problem solving, and say that this comes from thinking critically, communicating and collaborating. And we know solutions result best from all of this with reflection and more critical thinking. But what about time? How much time is given and how much time must be taken? 

 

The lecturer redeems himself by saying this: “I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is always someone else’s; it’s always what I’ve already heard about the subject, always the conventional wisdom. It’s only by concentrating, sticking to the question, being patient, letting all the parts of my mind come into play, that I arrive at an original idea. By giving my brain a chance to make associations, draw connections, take me by surprise. And often even that idea doesn’t turn out to be very good. I need time to think about it, too, to make mistakes and recognize them, to make false starts and correct them, to outlast my impulses, to defeat my desire to declare the job done and move on to the next thing.”

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 18, 2013 8:49 AM

At the heart of servant-leadership is mindfulness which includes being comfortable with the discomfort of solitude.

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Hey Leaders: People Are People

Hey Leaders: People Are People | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
It’s important to see that people are people. Sounds like an easy concept, doesn’t it? But it’s not! On Leadership And Empathy Viewing people as people means that we understand that others have fee...

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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We manage things and lead people

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John Lasschuit ®™'s comment, June 14, 2013 11:14 AM
You're welcom
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Beyond The Paycheck: What We Wish For

Beyond The Paycheck: What We Wish For | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Plenty of studies show that pay increases only serve as a short-term performance motivator. Certainly salary is important; every company should strive to compensate its employees fairly, but ...


Via Thomas Gelmi, Jose Luis Yañez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Significant autonomy is a key for many people. Many studies reveal that the unhappiest place is work for many people. Take less money and gain more freedom.

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Can you be dreaming, imagining, thinking, pondering and reflecting all in a few minutes?

Can you be dreaming, imagining, thinking, pondering and reflecting all in a few minutes? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings June 13, 2013 Can you be dreaming, imagining, thinking, pondering and reflecting all in a few minutes? I drove to south east Georgia for a trip over four years ago to take my oral ex...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I was not sure where to put this article. It is a powerful testament to the lifeo of teachers in the classroom.

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The Number One Job Skill in 2020

The Number One Job Skill in 2020 | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
What's the crucial career strength that employers everywhere are seeking -- even though hardly anyone is talking about it? A great way to find out is by studying this list of fast-growing occupations
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need real conversation where we are fully present and listen deeply. It sounds like mindfulness.

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Saying "I am sorry" is not only a matter of translation

Saying "I am sorry" is not only a matter of translation | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
While reading this article on how difficult it is to say: “I am sorry” in different cultures, it struck me that things which appear to be so simple on the surface can have a tremendous impact. This...

Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is difficult to say I am sorry beyond a superficial level. Really being sorry needs an action behind it. Have you ever asked for forgiveness? That is even harder.

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Jenny Ebermann's comment, June 12, 2013 10:27 AM
I could not agree more! Thanks for reading, Jenny
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How Happiness Directly Impacts Your Success

How Happiness Directly Impacts Your Success | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Feeling unhappy? Learn how increasing your happiness is within your power, and how doing so directly influences your success.

 

Recently a client shared with me the riveting TED Talk by the world’s leading positive psychology expert and bestselling author Shawn Achor on The Happy Secret to Better Work.  

His TED talk is one of the most popular of all time with over 4 million views, and he has a new lecture airing on PBS called “The Happiness Advantage.”

When my client told me about the talk, I questioned whether there would be anything new that I hadn’t already heard about happiness in my training as a therapist, but wow, was I wrong.

I asked Shawn what I wanted to know about happiness and success. Here are his answers...


Via Ariana Amorim, Katherine Bryant, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Happiness is important to being productive and successful.

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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, June 10, 2013 8:07 AM

From this article:

"Happiness fuels success, not the other way around. When we are positive, our brains become more engaged, creative, motivated, energetic, resilient, and productive at work."


"In the end, happiness is not the belief that we don’t need to change.  It is the belief that we can."


There are five key steps that we can take each day to increase our experience of happiness: 


1)      Bring gratitude to mind – Write down three NEW things that you are grateful for each day

2)      Journal – About a positive experience you’ve had recently for 2 minutes once a day

3)      Exercise –  Engage in 15 minutes of mindful cardio activity

4)      Meditate – Watch your breath go in and out for 2 minutes a day and

5)      Engage in a random, conscious act of kindness –  Write a 2-minute positive email thanking a friend or colleague, or compliment someone you admire on social media.

 

Do these steps for 21 days, and you will begin to see a lasting shift in your mindset towards more positivity.


AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 10, 2013 8:24 AM

Great list of areas to focus on in this article, realistic and relevant. 

Katherine Bryant's curator insight, June 11, 2013 6:35 AM

I love this research and used it recently as the basis of a workshop for which the a feedback was amazing! 

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Carrying Over Laozi

Carrying Over Laozi | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
The translation of Daodejing proceeds apace. Dear Wenlong works harder than ever to help me understand the simultaneous complexity and simplicity of Laozi. The term "to translate" literally mean to...

Via Keith Wayne Brown
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A deeper look at the Dao.

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Teaching Kids Peacemaking Skills

Teaching Kids Peacemaking Skills | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Peace First is working to create a kinder, gentler tomorrow by teaching our kids right today.

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The four points are spot on. What we need are opportunities to authentically bring them to life.

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John Michel's curator insight, June 7, 2013 3:54 PM

From dance lessons to SAT prep, we think about everything our kids need in their toolboxes for success. Let's make a similar commitment to instilling and modeling the basic building blocks of peacemaking. There's nothing simpler—and nothing more important.

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Mind Is A Verb, Not A Noun

Mind Is A Verb, Not A Noun | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
When talking about our minds, we have a tendency to take complicated processes and treat them as simplified things. For example, we say we want "happiness" or "confidence" or "motivation" but how do we know when we really have them?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting way of understanding mind.

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3 Causes for Judging People (and How to Accept Yourself)

3 Causes for Judging People (and How to Accept Yourself) | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Each encounter with someone else offers you the gift of greater self-awareness by illustrating what you do and don’t accept about yourself.

Via Mary Meduna, PhD
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The three causes are pretty interesting.

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How to Save Someone's Emotional Life | Six Seconds

How to Save Someone's Emotional Life | Six Seconds | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
How do you save an emotional life? When do you step in? How do you step in? What do you do? What do you say?

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is hard work. We tend to want to counsel or talk and judge at a time people need deep listening and a non-judgemental approach.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 6, 2013 4:24 PM

Powerful post! 

John Michel's curator insight, June 6, 2013 5:43 PM

Intervening to save someone’s emotional life isn’t easy. And it is almost impossible when we don’t know what to do. The hard part is speaking up—without offending—about observations.  How to deliver a message without insult requires the utmost of tact—and a careful balancing of words and actions, in order to reduce social distance and solidify communication.