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Leadership and Spirituality
What role does spirituality play in leadership? It makes the leader whole and fill the hole in the whole of the organization
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Forgiveness as a Business Tool

Forgiveness as a Business Tool | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

The knee-jerk reaction of too many people in leadership positions when they feel wronged is righteous indignation and the urge for revenge. But one factor that sets truly transformational leaders apart from the run-of-the-mill is the ability to forgive - to let feelings of anger, resentment and blame fall away and become something constructive.


Via AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is backbone component of servant-leadership and the doctoral program I am in.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 8, 2013 12:14 PM

Excellent scoop!  Thanks for the suggestion Kenneth!

Kenneth Mikkelsen's comment, July 8, 2013 3:17 PM
You're welcome, Al. Manfred Kets de Vries is a real capacity. I would recommend his book: "Putting leaders on the couch" - Video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cggpSvc014
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enjoy a moment of calm

enjoy a moment of calm | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
a digital relaxation experience

Via Dr. Amy Fuller
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It was good.

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Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, July 8, 2013 2:14 PM

Calm.com offers beautiful live digital scenes which you can choose from and a 2 minute guided meditation to set your mind, body and soul at ease. It has a great app for your smart phone to do on the go. 

This 2 minute mediation could be a great resource in those moments when we become emotionally highjacked and so full of negative emotion that it feels like we can't even breathe. 

There is a great app for smartphones. 

May you be at ease and calm. Amy Fuller Phd

http://www.scoop.it/t/calm 

www.amyfullerphd.com 

Jennifer Hoffmaster Christian's curator insight, July 9, 2013 11:27 AM

LOVE this! What a great way to destress and do a little self-care!

Pat Slade's curator insight, July 14, 2013 8:14 AM

Relaxation exercise that is easily accessible.

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5 Simple Tips to Meditate Like a Monk

5 Simple Tips to Meditate Like a Monk | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Day after day, you sit on the cushion, but every time you commit to sit your thoughts pull you away.

Via TechinBiz
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This is always helpful.

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Resilience for Our Students and Ourselves

Resilience for Our Students and Ourselves | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Our current leadership challenge lies in our capacity to be resilient ourselves, and to develop resilient students and systems.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The people who need the most in this area are classroom teachers.

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Daydream Believer: 5 Steps for Living Up to Our True Potential.

Daydream Believer: 5 Steps for Living Up to Our True Potential. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Daydream Believer: 5 Steps for Living Up to Your True Potential.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

(Re)define success. What is important is not always a number or material and can be hard to measure it. I know it when I see it though.

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The Hard Case for Soft Skills

The Hard Case for Soft Skills | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
I'm often asked about ways to influence others in the value of emotional intelligence within cultures that value high IQ.In a highly technical or scientific work setting, I like to introduce
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If you wait, you often respond rather than react.

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Listening to Your Ego, or Your True Self?

Listening to Your Ego, or Your True Self? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
For most people, ego becomes an issue only when someone has too much of it and is considered egotistical - and even then, a big ego is often equated with drive and success. The situation is very
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to be quiet sometimes and just be so we can listen and hear our inner teacher.

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Let's Reach Success

Let's Reach Success | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
(by Lidiya)

Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Live in the moment is the key point. Be present.

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, June 21, 2013 4:37 PM

Very nice post about how to live a life in happiness and full enjoyment of each moment.

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The Leader's Intellectual Health

The Leader's Intellectual Health | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Intellectual health flows from deep curiosity, an adaptive mindset & paradoxical thinking, helping leaders to create dialogue & insight for intelligent change.

Via donhornsby, ThinDifference, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Health is holistic.

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David Hain's curator insight, June 21, 2013 9:53 AM

Very good - reminds me of the work by Rooke and Torbert on stages of adult development.

Luís Cochofel's curator insight, June 22, 2013 12:35 PM

Stay curious; LEAD YOURSELF first!; your ability to be a Leader lies on your attitude.

 

Don Cloud's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:38 AM

Intellectual growth stems from lifelong learning seated in deep curiousity, and adaptive/growth mindset, and paradoxical thinking.

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How to Get From Distraction to Satisfaction

How to Get From Distraction to Satisfaction | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Multitasking can leave us feeling disoriented at the end of the day. What’s worse, this frenetic shifting between two or more things can rob us of a sense of satisfaction.Jeremy Hunter, PhD,

Via AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to be present and feel grounded in our work and lives.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:01 AM

This is totally relevant in so many ways...  


From the article:


Recollect


Mindfulness is one approach to shift away from distraction. One of the things that we work with in the course is to simply build in a moment – one minute, two minutes – where you just stop and let your attention come back to where you are. It doesn't look weird in the office. You’re simply stopping, pausing, taking a breath, and letting your attention recollect into the here-and-now. That’s a relatively easy way to regain your focus.

John Michel's curator insight, June 21, 2013 1:06 PM

Multitasking can leave us feeling disoriented at the end of the day. What’s worse, this frenetic shifting between two or more things can rob us of a sense of satisfaction.

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The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz

The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

At the heart of servant-leadership is mindfulness which includes being comfortable with the discomfort of solitude.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 13, 2013 2:23 PM

After reading this speech once, I realize these are the words I would have read to my past self in high school and again during my first days in college, and then again at the end of college at graduation. I would try to read them to my children at their different points in life (in person or as a digital avatar). There are powerful messages in this lecture delivered at West Point. He talks about leadership and what it means to be a leader, but he also explains how leadership and isolation play off of each other. He talks about how true leadership can be lonely and isolating, but also how loneliness and isolation can help you to become a better leader, a better thinker, a better human being. These include the abilities of a true leader: The ability to speak your mind even when you know what you are sharing is not held by the majority of those you are addressing; the ability to think critically, skeptically, and to adjust your perspectives to test and validate (or invalidate) a position, a solution, and even the questions asked of a problem, is valuable and rare. Maybe it's valuable because it's so rare. Or maybe it's so valuable because it isn't often appreciated at the time, like a work of great art or an invention that can't be commercialized. My favorite point was when he said, “So it’s perfectly natural to have doubts, or questions, or even just difficulties. The question is, what do you do with them? Do you suppress them, do you distract yourself from them, do you pretend they don’t exist? Or do you confront them directly, honestly, courageously? If you decide to do so, you will find that the answers to these dilemmas are not to be found on Twitter or Comedy Central or even in The New York Times. They can only be found within—without distractions, without peer pressure, in solitude.”

 

I don't agree that there is no leadership in many areas, many departments. I don't know how the author/speaker has come to those conclusions, considering his experiences and intelligence. Usually, people think they are being profound when they say there are no leaders, no poets, no great artists, etc. It's actually a sign that they lack imagination or real experience leading or creating. It's like saying we need to end poverty or hunger; saying it as if no body is trying to achieve these goals. Meanwhile, there are organizations plugging away, resisting, innovating, reaching, and achieving these goals...but at lower levels, lower numbers, temporarily. But he is not that guy. So, I value his speech and his ultimate points and reasoning and advice, but disagree on some points.

 

But leadership has changed, which is often unappreciated often. The “boss” is becoming ineffective. How do people realize that 21st century learning rejects lecturing and “top down” command structure and the “sage on the stage” but think leaders should still lecture and command from up-high? What is leadership in a world of complexity? Authority has changed. Hierarchies are collapsing, becoming lattices and noded-networks. Power and warfare include informality (informal power) and unorthodoxy (innovative).  Temporary teams focus on short term projects and objectives.

The more informed, intelligent, and experienced commentator should explain how leadership has changed. But that’s not what complainers do. They don’t talk about complexity, complications, and wicked problems. They sound like apologists. They appear weak and confused and bureaucratic. The eyes of the audience will go glassy. But what do we know about leadership from Star Trek? Was Captain Kirk a better leader than Jean Luc Picard? How do you evaluate Mission Impossible of today? I wonder if people still want Clint Eastwood types. In the Game of Thrones, we are introduced to different kinds of leaders and different kinds of heroes. I wonder who is best, most heroic, and more effective at leading.

We say we want better problem solving, and say that this comes from thinking critically, communicating and collaborating. And we know solutions result best from all of this with reflection and more critical thinking. But what about time? How much time is given and how much time must be taken? 

 

The lecturer redeems himself by saying this: “I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is always someone else’s; it’s always what I’ve already heard about the subject, always the conventional wisdom. It’s only by concentrating, sticking to the question, being patient, letting all the parts of my mind come into play, that I arrive at an original idea. By giving my brain a chance to make associations, draw connections, take me by surprise. And often even that idea doesn’t turn out to be very good. I need time to think about it, too, to make mistakes and recognize them, to make false starts and correct them, to outlast my impulses, to defeat my desire to declare the job done and move on to the next thing.”

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 14, 2013 9:02 AM

We need quiet time to meditate, contemplate, or pray. It does not make a difference what we call it. We need it.

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Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it? - SmartCompany.com.au

Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it? - SmartCompany.com.au | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence is a huge part of leadership, but how should we measure it?
SmartCompany.com.au
Currently neuroscience has become the dominant theme in emotional intelligence.

Via Wise Leader™, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Will we be able to measure it? Or will it be something that we recognize as the quality of organizations improves?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 17, 2013 3:16 PM

Great question to ponder.  Your thoughts?

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'70% Disengagement' - 3 Ways To Engage Those Who Aren't

'70% Disengagement' - 3 Ways To Engage Those Who Aren't | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
When leaders are committed and actively working to connect, inspire and embolden – they raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organisation contributes to all its stakeholders.

Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is build trust.

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The Sense of Play

The Sense of Play | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

The sense of play is a sense in every sense of the word. It is a sense, like sight is a sense, like hearing, like touch. If we tried to make a list of all the things we play and play with, the list...


Via Dr. Amy Fuller
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting site worth following which is what I have done.

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15 Ways to Stay Human. ~ Jennifer White & Bryonie Wise

15 Ways to Stay Human. ~ Jennifer White & Bryonie Wise | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
It often seems that many people out there have forgotten what a huge impact small acts of kindness have.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Some good ideas were included.

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Some might think that curriculum is sacred

Some might think that curriculum is sacred | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings July 6, 2013 Some might think that curriculum is sacred I took a couple of days hiatus last week due to getting back to graduate school and trying to dodge raindrops doing yard work ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A great post which ties into some ideas about the world we live in. Is curriculum important today? Or is it the skills, habits, atttudes, and practices of being a leaner that mean more? I think the latter.

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Listening to Your Ego, or Your True Self?

Listening to Your Ego, or Your True Self? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
For most people, ego becomes an issue only when someone has too much of it and is considered egotistical - and even then, a big ego is often equated with drive and success. The situation is very
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mindful living and being aware of who we are is essential.

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Infographic: Meditation in Schools Across America

Infographic: Meditation in Schools Across America | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Infographic: Maili Holiman





What do you think about this Schools That Work story? We'd love to hear from you!
Tweet your answer to @edutopia, comment below, or email us.

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am convinced and have been we need mindful education for our children.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 5, 2013 6:25 PM

This makes so much sense, and not just for students. I don't understand why more places aren't on board.

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How to Evaluate Your Own Emotional Intelligence

How to Evaluate Your Own Emotional Intelligence | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
‘What you need now is emotional intelligence,’ was what China’s new president told a graduating class last month at their top tech school.Now Bloomberg’s Businessweek tells us
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need this as we go into each day. Children need to be learning and using in their learning.

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Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, July 8, 2013 8:20 PM

Daniel Goleman, a guru or emotional intelligence, provides questions for self-reflection.  I've read his book on Emotional intelligence and he reports emotional intelligence, or what some of us call "soft skills," as the main indicator of success in the workplace. 

 

According to these 10 questions, intended for self-reflection, emotional intellegence includes self-awareness, acknowledgement of personal limitations and strengths, emotional regulation, adaptation to change, negotiation, empathy, persuasion, ability to focus and being a team player. 

 

And the good news: emotional intelligence competencies can be upgraded.

Dr. Amy Fuller

www.AmyFullerPhD.com

Jennifer Hoffmaster Christian's curator insight, July 9, 2013 4:38 PM

A great emotional intelligence checklist to see areas of strengths and areas that can grow.

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Using silence as your strategic edge

Using silence as your strategic edge | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
  Nature teaches us how silence allows all voices to come forth naturally and in their own time.

 


Via F. Thunus, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I attended Wisdom 2.0 which is an unconference and this was a key message for leadership. It is part of every wisdom tradition.

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F. Thunus's curator insight, July 3, 2013 12:58 AM

add your insight...

David Hain's curator insight, July 3, 2013 3:07 AM

The power of silence is immense.

donhornsby's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:07 AM

If you’ve noticed that your words aren’t landing and your voice isn’t being heard, begin to use silence in these ways.

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Talking to Others: How to Be Empathetic & Effective

Talking to Others: How to Be Empathetic & Effective | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
There is a delicate balance to strike between empathy and effectiveness in interpersonal communication.

 

Interpersonal communication — you know, talking with others — can be a tough nut to crack sometimes. Whether it be between family, colleagues or just plain socially, there is a delicate balance to strike between empathy and effectiveness.

 

Empathy begins with listening, of course, so it’s no wonder that many of us prefer talking! It extends to finding the right way to “connect back” with what a person said, especially if you disagree or are even offended. 

By LISA A. MILES


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Did we ever notice the words response and responsiblity share a common root. To respond and be responsible one has to step back, be less expert and more beginner mind oriented, and listen deeply.

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John Michel's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:11 PM

Interpersonal communication — you know, talking with others — can be a tough nut to crack sometimes. Whether it be between family, colleagues or just plain socially, there is a delicate balance to strike between empathy and effectiveness.

David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 2013 3:56 AM

If you don't listen well, you're probably not making consistently good choices...

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Why Everything You Know About Yourself Is Wrong

Why Everything You Know About Yourself Is Wrong | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
While we all casually refer to our self, no one knows quite what that self is. Nothing is so close at hand yet hard to grasp as selfhood.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The question "Who Am I" is an essential one to human growth.

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How to (Finally) Stand Up for Yourself. ~ Kat Fowler

How to (Finally) Stand Up for Yourself. ~ Kat Fowler | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
How to (Finally) Stand Up for Yourself. ~ Kat Fowler
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If I won' stand up for me, who will?

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The Power of Perspective

The Power of Perspective | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
“What we think about ourselves becomes the truth for us." — Louise Hay

Via Laurie Buchanan, PhD
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And, that is negative and positive.

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The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz

The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need quiet time to meditate, contemplate, or pray. It does not make a difference what we call it. We need it.

more...
Sharrock's curator insight, June 13, 2013 2:23 PM

After reading this speech once, I realize these are the words I would have read to my past self in high school and again during my first days in college, and then again at the end of college at graduation. I would try to read them to my children at their different points in life (in person or as a digital avatar). There are powerful messages in this lecture delivered at West Point. He talks about leadership and what it means to be a leader, but he also explains how leadership and isolation play off of each other. He talks about how true leadership can be lonely and isolating, but also how loneliness and isolation can help you to become a better leader, a better thinker, a better human being. These include the abilities of a true leader: The ability to speak your mind even when you know what you are sharing is not held by the majority of those you are addressing; the ability to think critically, skeptically, and to adjust your perspectives to test and validate (or invalidate) a position, a solution, and even the questions asked of a problem, is valuable and rare. Maybe it's valuable because it's so rare. Or maybe it's so valuable because it isn't often appreciated at the time, like a work of great art or an invention that can't be commercialized. My favorite point was when he said, “So it’s perfectly natural to have doubts, or questions, or even just difficulties. The question is, what do you do with them? Do you suppress them, do you distract yourself from them, do you pretend they don’t exist? Or do you confront them directly, honestly, courageously? If you decide to do so, you will find that the answers to these dilemmas are not to be found on Twitter or Comedy Central or even in The New York Times. They can only be found within—without distractions, without peer pressure, in solitude.”

 

I don't agree that there is no leadership in many areas, many departments. I don't know how the author/speaker has come to those conclusions, considering his experiences and intelligence. Usually, people think they are being profound when they say there are no leaders, no poets, no great artists, etc. It's actually a sign that they lack imagination or real experience leading or creating. It's like saying we need to end poverty or hunger; saying it as if no body is trying to achieve these goals. Meanwhile, there are organizations plugging away, resisting, innovating, reaching, and achieving these goals...but at lower levels, lower numbers, temporarily. But he is not that guy. So, I value his speech and his ultimate points and reasoning and advice, but disagree on some points.

 

But leadership has changed, which is often unappreciated often. The “boss” is becoming ineffective. How do people realize that 21st century learning rejects lecturing and “top down” command structure and the “sage on the stage” but think leaders should still lecture and command from up-high? What is leadership in a world of complexity? Authority has changed. Hierarchies are collapsing, becoming lattices and noded-networks. Power and warfare include informality (informal power) and unorthodoxy (innovative).  Temporary teams focus on short term projects and objectives.

The more informed, intelligent, and experienced commentator should explain how leadership has changed. But that’s not what complainers do. They don’t talk about complexity, complications, and wicked problems. They sound like apologists. They appear weak and confused and bureaucratic. The eyes of the audience will go glassy. But what do we know about leadership from Star Trek? Was Captain Kirk a better leader than Jean Luc Picard? How do you evaluate Mission Impossible of today? I wonder if people still want Clint Eastwood types. In the Game of Thrones, we are introduced to different kinds of leaders and different kinds of heroes. I wonder who is best, most heroic, and more effective at leading.

We say we want better problem solving, and say that this comes from thinking critically, communicating and collaborating. And we know solutions result best from all of this with reflection and more critical thinking. But what about time? How much time is given and how much time must be taken? 

 

The lecturer redeems himself by saying this: “I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is always someone else’s; it’s always what I’ve already heard about the subject, always the conventional wisdom. It’s only by concentrating, sticking to the question, being patient, letting all the parts of my mind come into play, that I arrive at an original idea. By giving my brain a chance to make associations, draw connections, take me by surprise. And often even that idea doesn’t turn out to be very good. I need time to think about it, too, to make mistakes and recognize them, to make false starts and correct them, to outlast my impulses, to defeat my desire to declare the job done and move on to the next thing.”

 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 18, 2013 8:49 AM

At the heart of servant-leadership is mindfulness which includes being comfortable with the discomfort of solitude.