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Ten minutes to mindfulness

Ten minutes to mindfulness | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
A new initiative is helping people find time to de-stress in their day.

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Some straightforward suggestions are mentioned. They are easy to implement and would work easily in classrooms.

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Pacific Cove's curator insight, May 1, 5:37 PM

"When you make space for your mind, there is more room for creativity and innovation. That's probably why Google has started bringing mindfulness meditation into their workplace," says Bialylew.

#Seniors #SeniorCare

Electric Car's curator insight, May 3, 12:59 PM

Tips for making mindfulness part of daily life

"Anything can be done mindfully," says Granger, adding formal mindfulness practice will make it easier for you to bring it into everyday life.

 

Here are some tips, given by both Granger and Bialylew, which should help you start or maintain your own mindfulness practice.


1. At any point in your day, pay attention to your breath.

Simply taking five or 10 minutes out of your day to sit and do the best you can to focus your attention on your breath is a great way to exercise your meditation muscle.

"This allows you to unhook, and stop worrying about the future and the past," says Bialylew.


2. Practice while you eat.

"When we eat we are generally doing other things and we're rushing, we're not in the present, so mindful eating is about bringing awareness to the experience," says Bialylew.

She says concentrate on all the senses – the colours, the sensations of chewing and of course the flavour and smell.


3. Pay attention to "transitions".

Granger says try making a conscious effort to be present during travel or between tasks.

"These are all great opportunities for deliberately shifting gears so that we can wisely choose how we engage with the new context," says Granger.


4. Have a mindful shower.

Bialylew suggests paying attention to the sensation of the water, the temperature, as well as the sound of the water when you take a shower.


5. Turn off.

As hard as it might be to turn away from the television or computer screen or to put down your phone or iPad, Granger says it's important to switch off from technology at least once a day.

"Listen to the ordinary sounds that are present in your environment, rather than always being 'plugged in'," says Granger.



Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life/money-and-careers/ten-minutes-to-mindfulness-20140429-37ey4.html#ixzz30flk4zut

From around the web

Leadership and Spirituality
What role does spirituality play in leadership? It makes the leader whole and fill the hole in the whole of the organization
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Could mindfulness help teachers manage stress?

Could mindfulness help teachers manage stress? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

sh

Amanda Bailey explains how she teaches mindfulness skills in school to help staff and students manage stress and improve concentration

Via Maree Whiteley
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The short answer is yes. The article provides insight and links for furthering the process.

 

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, October 21, 9:10 PM

A fabulous article that will resonate with most teachers (and students)..."Mindfulness is a skill that has to be practiced regularly and over the long term to realise the most benefit. The more we bring our mind into the present in a formal or informal way then the more we can train the mind to pay attention to all aspects of our life."

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What Happens to the Brain When You Meditate (And How it Benefits You)

What Happens to the Brain When You Meditate (And How it Benefits You) | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Our mission is to educate one another, while also sharing ideas and concepts that can change the direction of our society.

Via Anne Leong, bill woodruff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meditative practices are important. Science is now catching up to what has been known intuitively for centuries.

 

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think2share's curator insight, September 19, 4:46 PM

But yes, Meditation is about so much more than shown here. 

 

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Breath: Our Best Bad*ss Friend. ~ Sarah Diedrick

Breath: Our Best Bad*ss Friend. ~ Sarah Diedrick | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Stay wrapped up in the embrace of your breath. Feel it comb through your body. Is it burning yet?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Breathing is a way to slow the body and mind down focusing on the moment we are in.

 

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Gudrun Frerichs's curator insight, September 10, 9:11 PM

For those who struggle to clear their mind - focus on your breath!

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Breathe with Me. ~ Toby Israel

Breathe with Me. ~ Toby Israel | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
I stopped trying to do everything at once, and focused on doing one thing at a time. Sometimes, that thing would be breathing.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Taking and expelling a breath is an important part of being and becoming who we are in each ensuing moment.

 

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Gudrun Frerichs's curator insight, September 10, 9:12 PM

Beautiful and simple!

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Spiritual Life is Not a Race

Spiritual Life is Not a Race | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Combine this with authentic leadership and neither is a race. We thin of School as a play to achieve presupposed outcomes as though they are a given in some singular format for each person entering classrooms. We test them and collect marks like they are possessions. David Jardine used the term whiling over the worth of what we learn; Ted Aoki spoke of lingering in learning, and John Dewey wrote about the aesthetic quality of living which takes times. What if teaching and learning are conversations? Would that not make them worth whiling, lingering, and aesthetically expressing?

 

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Earth Does Not Belong To Man Alone - Inspirational Quotations

Earth Does Not Belong To Man Alone - Inspirational Quotations | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Another and probably my last -  time lapse 3D you tube from the same Film Creator,  together with an important message from  mycologist, Paul Stamets where he discusses the important role mushrooms...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Humans are not separate and overlords of the Earth and Universe. We are part of it and embedded in deep relationships. Teaching comes from this place of being embedded.

 

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beyond a system ...

beyond a system ... | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
click the thumbnails, to enlarge ... Diamond Sutra  (7): Then Buddha asked Subhuti, "What do you think, Subhuti, has the Buddha arrived at the highest, most fulfilled, most awakened and enlightened...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Another article I scooped today proposed that leading is a rational process. This article does not refute that, but offers an explanation about that supports an intuitive aspect to teaching, learning, and leading. We integrate the rational and intuitive into our lives in ways that help us navigate life and its works.

 

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4 Other Words for Mindfulness. ~ Ruth Lera

4 Other Words for Mindfulness. ~ Ruth Lera | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Mindfulness is just a word, a word to describe a way to experience a moment. But sometimes certain words don’t work for their intended purpose and we need to f
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Noticing, welcoming, pausing, and awareness are ways to experience mindfulness.

 

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Word of the Week "Moral Compass": Meditate on this Phrase

Word of the Week "Moral Compass": Meditate on this Phrase | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

These two words used together are important – very important.  In the legal profession, we must use a moral compass because we meet people who have lost their way.  We have to make sure, at all time, that we do not head in the wrong direction also.

 

Take time to meditate about the meaning of the word “moral compass” to you.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Moral

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Values


Via Gust MEES, Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am unsure that moral compass is a device. A compass is, but thinking of morals in an instrumental way, even metaphorically, misses the point. Having said this, the article makes good points. We communicate morals through our words, actions, thoughts, etc. It is communicating that is important.

 

Teachers communicate all the time. We should consider what that means to the learning of others.

 

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Take a break

Take a break | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Enough to make kitty's hair stand on end. Enjoy!


Via Vilma Bonilla
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I think I will now.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, August 18, 3:56 PM

I can relate. ❤

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The Only Thing We Need to be Happy.

The Only Thing We Need to be Happy. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
"If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion." ~ Dalai Lama
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is about relationships. Healthy relationships are about compassion. Using compassion and inviting students into healthy relationships is critical to the relationships. I had a wonderful conversation today with two other educators about relationships and compassion.

 

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Spiritual Life is Hard

Spiritual Life is Hard | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Spiritual life and life that gives us voice can be trying and challenging. This is life in general. The good and not so good mix together and bring many lessons for learning. Spiritual life is pausing and listening for the voice from within that says we are doing OK even when times are hard.

 

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Don't stress - live in the moment! Making mindfulness work for you

Don't stress - live in the moment! Making mindfulness work for you | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Believe it or not, some people try mindfulness and find that it actually adds to their stress levels rather than helps them feel calmer and more balanced. How can this be? Like so many topics that...

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Letting go and not judging would likely reduce stress. What a wonderful approach for classrooms to be able to be without judging.

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Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity

Buddhist Economics: How to Stop Prioritizing Goods Over People and Consumption Over Creative Activity | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

What does it really mean to create wealth for people — for humanity — as opposed to money for governments and corporations?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

David Loy and Marc Anielski write on the Buddhism and economics. Other sources might be Wendell Berry and Gary Snynder who write about ecology and economics being connected.

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, October 14, 4:43 PM

Rhodes Scholar, and economic theorist E. F. Schumacher's1973 book Small Is Beautiful: Economics as if People Mattered was deemed by The Times Literary Supplement one of the 100 most important books published since WWII.


Sharing an ideological kinship with such influential minds as Tolstoy and Gandhi, Schumacher’s is a masterwork of intelligent counterculture, applying history’s deepest, most timeless wisdom to the most pressing issues of modern life in an effort to educate, elevate and enlighten.

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Study: Why Atheists Are So Disliked and Distrusted

Study: Why Atheists Are So Disliked and Distrusted | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
New research attempts to pinpoint why non-believers are widely disliked and distrusted.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting that Thomas Merton, a Trappist Monk, suggested atheists were as likely to be good Christians as Christians. Character is not only measured in what we say we believe, but in the proof offered in our actions.

 

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Sharrock's curator insight, September 15, 9:30 PM

“Atheists are stereotyped to be (among other things) cynical, skeptical, and nonconformist,” they write. “Individuals perceived to endorse conflicting values, or who fail to openly endorse group values, could threaten to undermine performance and success of the group as a whole by failing to adhere to group norms.”

 

“Although acceptance and egalitarianism are endorsed as traditional American values,” they add, “perceptions of violations to personal and group values are often seen as justification for hostile attitudes and subsequent discrimination. Such justification is reflected in the unwillingness to accept atheists as an everyday part of American society.”

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30 Life Changing Lessons to Learn from Thích Nhất Hạnh

30 Life Changing Lessons to Learn from Thích Nhất Hạnh | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
30 Life Changing Lessons to Learn from Thích Nhất Hạnh - Waking Times. September 7, 2014 By WakingTimes  Luminita Saviuc, Purpose Fairy                    When I think of Thích Nhất Hạnh, words lik...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What if teachers read this and their teaching included the ideas embedded in authentic ways. For example, never underestimate the power of a kind word, a touch, and a smile. Greeting each child as they walk in the door in an authentic way changes the world we live and teach in.

 

 

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, September 9, 5:26 AM

It sounds simple but not many people these days seem to apply the basics...

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Mindfulness Isn’t Enough: How to Live our Dharma.

Mindfulness Isn’t Enough: How to Live our Dharma. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Mindfulness isn't enough; we need compassionate action too. Mindfulness, or daily life practice, or being, must be paired with action, with compassion, or
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is an ethical practice and practices. It requires compassion and taking one's time. Sometimes when we slow down we actually go faster.

 

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How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination

How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that self-compassion improves mood, largely by helping us avoid negative rumination.


Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are often our harshest critic. Imagine what this means in School with students and teachers?

 

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Gudrun Frerichs's curator insight, September 4, 4:39 PM

it's not rocket science, it's common sense!

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Love Notes.

Love Notes. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Tyler Knott Gregson captures a poetic moment with clarity and precision, creating emotional saturation in a brevity of space, as if he developed a photograph
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article about poetry, love, and creativity.

 

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Decompressing emotions with radical acceptance

Decompressing emotions with radical acceptance | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

A common way in which we deal with unpleasant emotions is to suppress or ignore them. These are normal coping mechanisms our minds use to handle situations we don’t particularly want to deal with in the present moment. When strong emotions come into our consciousness, there is often something inside of us which says, “This is going to ruin my happiness right now and I don’t like that, so I’ll just deal with it later.” The problem with this approach is that ‘later’ never comes and these emotions get pushed further down, out of our conscious awareness.

It is a basic law of the universe that energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change form. The same law applies to our consciousness. We can suppress emotions for a very long time, and although they leave our conscious awareness, it doesn’t mean they are completely gone. This repressed emotional energy gets buried deep within the basement of our subconscious, where it sits gathering ‘emotional dust’.

This ‘dust’ is actually emotional energy that resonates with the repressed emotion. These emotions also attract like-emotions, and they do this by bringing situations into our day-to-day life which activate and feed them with similar emotional energy. In this way, suppressed emotions (which are basically energetic patterns) begin to gain more power, until an emotional pressure begins to build.

This internal pressure of repressed emotions is what many of us are afraid to look at. This gradually accumulates until the pressure becomes too great to remain hidden, and rises to the surface in a fit of rage, depression or an uncharacteristic emotional reaction. When this breakdown happens, we feel a temporary relief from the released energy. However, if we don’t work to bleed out all the accumulated energy, the pressure will, once again, begin to build until the next ‘external’ event releases more of the pressure.

When an emotional trauma occurs, there is the choice to either deal with it effectively or to turn away from it. When we choose to turn away from it, we must do something with the energy of the situation. We either 1) repress/suppress the emotions, 2) express them (i.e. saying things out of anger), or 3) distract ourselves with something else.

These debilitating forms of handling emotions lead to the reinforcement of an emotional pattern within the psyche, which can eventually take on a life of its own and begin to run our lives. When approached in this way, the process can continue indefinitely, or until a complete (often called nervous) breakdown occurs. The nervous breakdown, although traumatic, usually has a very transformative effect because a vast amount of pent-up emotion is released in a very short period of time. It is this catharsis, or ‘dark night of the soul’, that is touched upon in many world myths, religions, and shamanic traditions.

THE GOOD NEWS

The good news is that we don’t have to wait for a complete nervous breakdown to start letting these repressed emotions go. There is a way to let out this emotional pressure, no matter how deep, in a beneficial and transformative way. It requires radical self-honesty and the courage to face the fear that played a main part in suppressing the emotions in the first place.  It is not the easiest of paths, and not to be undertaken lightly, but it is one that we must take if we wish to live a truly peaceful and balanced life.
THE DECOMPRESSION PROCESS

First, it is important to create a safe environment in which the decompression process can occur.

The tools for cultivating this are simple: humility and acceptance. We can become humble to the fact that everything is fine, and the emotions we fear coming up, in reality, are not going to kill us, even though at times it may feel like it. We can also cultivate an attitude of acceptance towards all the emotions that arise and just observe them, without judgment.

Second, drop the urge to label the emotions as they arise. Ignore all thoughts about the emotion and instead focus on the sensations that occur in the body. At first, this may be difficult to do, as an emotional numbness can be present. If this is the case, focus on the intention to just feel them, and eventually it will happen.

Once the thoughts and labels about the emotions have been dropped, just sit with the feelings, without trying to change them. Notice if there is a resistance to the way the emotions feel, and just be with that. If a resistance is felt, the key is to not resist the resistance.

In the space of observing the emotions as they are occurring, free of any mental labeling, they become only energies playing out across the energetic backdrop of consciousness. Since there are no labels, it doesn’t even matter if they are there or not. You can ask the question, “What if this feeling stayed in the body forever?” Then what? Would it kill you to feel this way forever? Probably not…

THE RADICAL STEP: ACCEPTING THE EMOTIONS, AS THEY ARE

Try for just a second to experiment with the possibility of the emotion never leaving you, and being totally okay with it, without needing to change anything. Notice how this attitude feels, compared to that of resistance. It can almost feel peaceful, even in the midst of a very heavy emotion.

By dropping the mental labeling of the emotion and the resistance to feeling it, we allow the emotional energy to return into the flow of the universe, rather than keeping it bottled up inside of us. Since there is no longer a resistance to feeling the emotion, there is no longer anything keeping it from leaving; it is finally free to go.

As can be seen, there is no limit to how much you can accept what is happening, to just let it be. Fortunately, there is a limit to the energy of the emotion being let out. If we are patient enough and continue to surrender to the process, eventually the pressure of the emotion runs itself out completely, as if a fire has burned it out of us. It is this transformative fire of the decompression process that clears out all of the unpleasant feelings associated with repressed emotions. What remains is the warmth from the fire, and in it all of the lessons we were meant to learn from the experience.

 

Photo cred: mine (V.B.) and my son.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quantum physics and spirituality have a lot in common.

 

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5 Everyday Practices to Living the Good Life

5 Everyday Practices to Living the Good Life | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
  While growing up I often would ask questions about things that perplexed me and my dad often answered me with, “life doesn’t come with an instruction manual.” As a kid I would just look at him still perplexed as he would go back to reading his newspaper, as a teenager I would scowl at …

Via craig daniels
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The endless practice of being and becoming who we are is ongoing. I wonder what that means in teaching and learning?

 

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Bring the Fiery Light of Awareness With These 4 Steps. ~ Ruth Lera

Bring the Fiery Light of Awareness With These 4 Steps. ~ Ruth Lera | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Having problems might not be going anywhere for the human race anytime soon. But needing to run from them might be.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first step is quieting the mind and allowing the problem to reveal itself in the quietness. We can begin to lean in only after we recognize and name the problem.

 

The last few years I was a teaching I found realizing the problems at hand allowed me to deal with them differently. I shifted my attitude. After all, it is impossible to shift someone else's attitude.

 

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A Mindful Season | Mindful

A Mindful Season | Mindful | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
As the holiday season approaches, Janice Marturano asks us to consider the treasures in our lives and offers a short practice for reflecting on those treasures.

Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article is several months old, but makes a good case for being mindful and discovering/rediscovering our personal treasures. It is important for people to feel connected to their lives, work, and their relationships with people and in the world.

 

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, August 17, 2:04 PM

#mindful #leadership

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A Meditation for Taming the Monkey Mind

A Meditation for Taming the Monkey Mind | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
A Meditation for Taming the Monkey Mind. Many of us in this fast-paced world are plagued with an equally fast-paced mind.nbsp Our thoughts can become a whirlwind as we try to juggle the many events in our schedule along with the ongoing dialogue we have with ourselves.nbsp Many of us have been conditioned to use a judgmental

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We live in a world of paradox rather than one of binary opposites. Mindfulness does not eliminate the deep-seated belief in the binary opposites. It provides ways of understanding the way we deal with those binaries.

 

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A New Approach to Education

A New Approach to Education | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Empathy and Academic Success
The key to compassion is being predisposed to help -- and that can be learned.
 

There is an active school movement in character education and teaching ethics. But I don't think it's enough to have children just learn about ethical virtuosity, because

 

we need to embody our ethical beliefs by acting on them. This begins with empathy.


Daniel Goleman 

Author, 'Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence'

Culture of Empathy Builder Page: 
 http://bit.ly/jc7Dam


  

Peter M. Senge 
Culture of Empathy Builder Page: 

Senior Lecturer at the MIT

http://j.mp/1nsrN4v



Via Edwin Rutsch, Suvi Salo
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The key to compassion is to be willing to help the other person and make the world a better place with one's efforts. @ivon_ehd1
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Amy Melendez's curator insight, August 6, 9:14 PM

From the article:

 

Learning in general happens best in a warm, supportive atmosphere, in which there exists a feeling of safety, of being supported and cared about, of closeness and connection. In such a space children's brains more readily reach the state of optimal cognitive efficiency -- and of caring about others.

Such an atmosphere has particular importance for those children at most risk of going off track in their lives because of early experiences of deprivation, abuse, or neglect. Studies of such high-risk kids who have ended up thriving in their lives -- who are resilient -- find that usually the one person who turned their life around was a caring adult.