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Empathy: The Missing Link to Solving the World's Most Pressing Problems

Empathy: The Missing Link to Solving the World's Most Pressing Problems | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

But never has empathy been so important. We live in an unprecedented era of accelerated and unpredictable change. I completely agree with Rifkin that "the empathic evolution of the human race and the profound ways it has shaped our development... will likely decide our fate as a species."

 

I wonder whether I can single out the development of empathy as the most important issue that underscores all other issues in the World Economic Forum's Survey on the Global Agenda? I would love to hear global leaders discuss that topic! And now, how to reframe my assignment to my Columbia MBAs?

Pamela Hartigan

Director of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Saїd Business School, University of Oxford


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Empathy is important. It begins at home and ripples from there.

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Scott Span, MSOD's curator insight, July 11, 2013 1:47 PM

Underestimated.

ThinDifference's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:25 AM

"Empathy conjures up active engagement -- the willingness of an observer to become part of another's experience, to share the feeling of that experience."

God Is.'s curator insight, July 13, 2013 11:16 AM

What would Jesus do?

Leadership and Spirituality
What role does spirituality play in leadership? It makes the leader whole and fill the hole in the whole of the organization
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Waylon with Krishna Das: A fun, yet Serious Man with a Voice that Could Move Mountains to Dance.

Waylon with Krishna Das: A fun, yet Serious Man with a Voice that Could Move Mountains to Dance. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Waylon chats with Krishna Das, the cowboy of kirtan, on service as joy.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Chanting does put a person in the moment.

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Classroom Yoga Helps Improve Behavior Of Kids With Autism

Classroom Yoga Helps Improve Behavior Of Kids With Autism | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Kids with autism who did a yoga routine at school every morning for 17 minutes behaved better, researchers at New York University found.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Personally, I think it goes beyond children with autism. We should be using yoga and other meditative practices for all children and teachers.

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Non-Judging, Non-Striving and the Pillars of Mindfulness Practice

Non-Judging, Non-Striving and the Pillars of Mindfulness Practice | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Twelve of us sit in a circle at the third session of the mindfulness-based stress reduction course (MBSR) offered at the hospital. The program was developed 35

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A good summary of what mindfulness can be about.It is about making life better and contributing to the world. It is not just about improving corporate bottom lines.

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Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's curator insight, April 14, 11:03 AM

All geniuses of the world practice Mindfulness in some manner. Maybe that is why they could meet geniuses.status.

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Don't Step on Me, Meditation in The Midst of Change

Don't Step on Me, Meditation in The Midst of Change | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Meditating while in the Midst of Change swirling around is unique, filiming it is somethng else.. find out more.

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I like the picture. Chogyam Trungpa says meditation is what we do in our lives. If it means meditating on the sidewalk, what can I say?

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craig daniels's curator insight, April 9, 5:23 PM

Taylor Powell has come up with a very powerful idea to film people meditating in the middle of everyday... Check it out

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How Meditation Helps You With Difficult Emotions

How Meditation Helps You With Difficult Emotions | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

"It’s hard to imagine life without fear. Its raw power can save lives. It can also paralyze us and invade every part of our life. Taming it and directing is one of life’s greatest challenges."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meditation and mindfulness can help calm fears and address underlying reasons they exist. Several years, I was driving to a meeting I had been summoned to attend. I felt quite apprehensive, so I pulled over and asked my self what made me feel like that. It helped calm me and I went into the meeting in a better frame of mind. The reason I was apprehensive is I like to be in charge and I was not. Knowing this helped immensely and continues to be an effective understanding. Without meditation and mindfulness, I would not have gotten to this point.

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Online Therapist's curator insight, April 10, 11:06 AM

The way we can tame our fear is by turning toward the emotion and embracing it in a much larger space of conscious awareness and compassion.

Visit: http://www.counselingtherapyonline.com.

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Why I Need To Meditate, Starting Yesterday

Why I Need To Meditate, Starting Yesterday | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

"Despite the fact that I have no experience with a regular practice, I am aware of it’s benefits and as my quest to slow the train down grows, so does my commitment to incorporating meditation into my daily schedule."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some concise points made about meditating in the article i.e. keep it simple. Based on this, meditation is something that is introduceable in schools.

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Online Therapist's curator insight, April 9, 9:35 AM

Mindfulness meditation can be very effective for managing emotional stress and anxiety. Visit http://www.counselingtherapyonline.com

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In Memory of MLK, Mindful Human Extraordinaire.

In Memory of MLK, Mindful Human Extraordinaire. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Let's continue to believe in equality, in progress, and in love. Let's continue to run, walk, crawl, and think in the direction that points to what we believe to be correct livelihood—the world we work toward achieving as a human race.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sometimes mindfulness is right there in obvious examples and we overlook that quality in our heroes.

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A Moment of Mindfulness

A Moment of Mindfulness | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

"Doing something to awaken a curiosity within us. Intrigued by someone else. Wondering for that moment as to what simple thing we can do to make them happy. Our only motivation is to see the joy spread across their face."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no distinction between the giver, the receiver, and the gift. The author concluded the article with that incredible insight.  Education could be that way. When I think of pedagogy, it is an invitation into learning. Teachers invite students to enter into their learning and the acceptance is the student's choice.

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craig daniels's curator insight, April 5, 2:27 PM

When you give a gift you've stepped out of yourself for just a moment and thought about someone else... Step Out Of Yourself.

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7 Ways To Bring More Mindfulness Into Your Life Today

7 Ways To Bring More Mindfulness Into Your Life Today | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

"Mindfulness is simply a shift in the way we’re paying attention to our lives. It means that instead of drifting through the day on auto-pilot, we’re fully inhabiting, and fully awake to, each moment of our life as it unfolds."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mindful listening is a great place to begin. Listening to one's self and others transforms relationships. What would classrooms look like if we listened deeply to each and spoke with meaning?

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Ellen Diane's curator insight, April 5, 7:14 AM

a necessary thing:) thanx

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6 Ways to Let Go of Past Regrets and Live in the Present

6 Ways to Let Go of Past Regrets and Live in the Present | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

"If I had a nickel for all the hours I've spent rehashing decisions I've made in the past, I’d have to get a bigger closet for all the shoes I‘d be able to buy. When it comes to thinking about the woulda, coulda, shoulda in any past situations, I’m the Queen of Regret."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is difficult to think that something that bothers us personally is not important in the grand schemed of things, but it is true. I told students there were 6 billion (now 7 billion plus) people on Earth. It did not matter to many people what was happening in little piece of the world.

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Change leader, change thyself

Change leader, change thyself | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

Anyone who pulls the organization in new directions must look inward as well as outward.

 Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves.1

Building self-understanding and then translating it into an organizational context is easier said than done, and getting started is often the hardest part. We hope this article helps leaders who are ready to try and will intrigue those curious to learn more.


Organizations don’t change—people do

Many companies move quickly from setting their performance objectives to implementing a suite of change initiatives. Be it a new growth strategy or business-unit structure, the integration of a recent acquisition or the rollout of a new operational-improvement effort, such organizations focus on altering systems and structures and on creating new policies and processes.

To achieve collective change over time, actions like these are necessary but seldom sufficient. A new strategy will fall short of its potential if it fails to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it.

McKinsey research and client experience suggest that half of all efforts to transform organizational performance fail either because senior managers don’t act as role models for change or because people in the organization defend the status quo.2 In other words, despite the stated change goals, people on the ground tend to behave as they did before. Equally, the same McKinsey research indicates that if companies can identify and address pervasive mind-sets at the outset, they are four times more likely to succeed in organizational-change efforts than are companies that overlook this stage.
Look both inward and outward

Companies that only look outward in the process of organizational change—marginalizing individual learning and adaptation—tend to make two common mistakes.

The first is to focus solely on business outcomes. That means these companies direct their attention to what Alexander Grashow, Ronald Heifetz, and Marty Linsky call the “technical” aspects of a new solution, while failing to appreciate what they call “the adaptive work” people must do to implement it.

The second common mistake, made even by companies that recognize the need for new learning, is to focus too much on developing skills. Training that only emphasizes new behavior rarely translates into profoundly different performance outside the classroom.

In our work together with organizations undertaking leadership and cultural transformations, we’ve found that the best way to achieve an organization’s aspirations is to combine efforts that look outward with those that look inward. Linking strategic and systemic intervention to genuine self-discovery and self-development by leaders is a far better path to embracing the vision of the organization and to realizing its business goals.


What is looking inward?

Looking inward is a way to examine your own modes of operating to learn what makes you tick. Individuals have their own inner lives, populated by their beliefs, priorities, aspirations, values, and fears. These interior elements vary from one person to the next, directing people to take different actions.

Interestingly, many people aren’t aware that the choices they make are extensions of the reality that operates in their hearts and minds. Indeed, you can live your whole life without understanding the inner dynamics that drive what you do and say. Yet it’s crucial that those who seek to lead powerfully and effectively look at their internal experiences, precisely because they direct how you take action, whether you know it or not. Taking accountability as a leader today includes understanding your motivations and other inner drives.

For the purposes of this article, we focus on two dimensions of looking inward that lead to self-understanding: developing profile awareness and developing state awareness.


Profile awareness

An individual’s profile is a combination of his or her habits of thought, emotions, hopes, and behavior in various circumstances. Profile awareness is therefore a recognition of these common tendencies and the impact they have on others.

We often observe a rudimentary level of profile awareness with the executives we advise. They use labels as a shorthand to describe their profile, telling us, “I’m an overachiever” or “I’m a control freak.” Others recognize emotional patterns, like “I always fear the worst,” or limiting beliefs, such as “you can’t trust anyone.” Other executives we’ve counseled divide their identity in half. They end up with a simple liking for their “good” Dr. Jekyll side and a dislike of their “bad” Mr. Hyde.

Finding ways to describe the common internal tendencies that drive behavior is a good start. We now know, however, that successful leaders develop profile awareness at a broader and deeper level.


State awareness

State awareness, meanwhile, is the recognition of what’s driving you at the moment you take action. In common parlance, people use the phrase “state of mind” to describe this, but we’re using “state” to refer to more than the thoughts in your mind. State awareness involves the real-time perception of a wide range of inner experiences and their impact on your behavior. These include your current mind-set and beliefs, fears and hopes, desires and defenses, and impulses to take action.

State awareness is harder to master than profile awareness. While many senior executives recognize their tendency to exhibit negative behavior under pressure, they often don’t realize they’re exhibiting that behavior until well after they’ve started to do so. At that point, the damage is already done.

We believe that in the future, the best leaders will demonstrate both profile awareness and state awareness. These capacities can develop into the ability to shift one’s inner state in real time. That leads to changing behavior when you can still affect the outcome, instead of looking back later with regret. It also means not overreacting to events because they are reminiscent of something in the past or evocative of something that might occur in the future.


Close the performance gap

When learning to look inward in the process of organizational transformation, individuals accelerate the pace and depth of change dramatically. In the words of one executive we know, who has invested heavily in developing these skills, this kind of learning “expands your capacity to lead human change and deliver true impact by awakening the full leader within you.” In practical terms, individuals learn to align what they intend with what they actually say and do to influence others.

Erica Ariel Fox’s recent book, Winning from Within,5 calls this phenomenon closing your performance gap. That gap is the disparity between what people know they should say and do to behave successfully and what they actually do in the moment. The performance gap can affect anyone at any time, from the CEO to a summer intern.

This performance gap arises in individuals partly because of the profile that defines them and that they use to define themselves. In the West in particular, various assessments tell you your “type,” essentially the psychological clothing you wear to present yourself to the world.

To help managers and employees understand each other, many corporate-education tools use simplified typing systems to describe each party’s makeup. These tests often classify people relatively quickly, and in easily remembered ways: team members might be red or blue, green or yellow, for example.

There are benefits in this approach, but in our experience it does not go far enough and those using it should understand its limitations. We all possess the full range of qualities these assessments identify. We are not one thing or the other: we are all at once, to varying degrees. As renowned brain researcher Dr. Daniel Siegel explains, “we must accept our multiplicity, the fact that we can show up quite differently in our athletic, intellectual, sexual, spiritual—or many other—states. A heterogeneous collection of states is completely normal in us humans.”6 Putting the same point more poetically, Walt Whitman famously wrote, “I am large, I contain multitudes.”

To close performance gaps, and thereby build your individual leadership capacity, you need a more nuanced approach that recognizes your inner complexity. Coming to terms with your full richness is challenging. But the kinds of issues involved—which are highly personal and well beyond the scope of this short management article—include:

    What are the primary parts of my profile, and how are they balanced against each other?
    What resources and capabilities does each part of my profile possess? What strengths and liabilities do those involve?
    When do I tend to call on each member of my inner executive team? What are the benefits and costs of those choices?
    Do I draw on all of the inner sources of power available to me, or do I favor one or two most of the time?
    How can I develop the sweet spots that are currently outside of my active range?

Answering these questions starts with developing profile awareness.


Leading yourself—and the organization

Individuals can improve themselves in many ways and hence drive more effective organizational change. We focus here on a critical few that we’ve found to increase leadership capacity and to have a lasting organizational impact.

1. Develop profile awareness: Map the Big Four

While we all have myriad aspects to our inner lives, in our experience it’s best to focus your reflections on a manageable few as you seek to understand what’s driving you at different times. Fox’s Winning from Within suggests that you can move beyond labels such as “perfectionist” without drowning in unwieldy complexity, by concentrating on your Big Four, which largely govern the way individuals function every day. You can think of your Big Four as an inner leadership team, occupying an internal executive suite: the chief executive officer (CEO), or inspirational Dreamer; the chief financial officer (CFO), or analytical Thinker; the chief people officer (CPO), or emotional Lover; and the chief operating officer (COO), or practical Warrior (exhibit).

Exhibit pictured on website: http://www.mckinsey.com/Insights/Leading_in_the_21st_century/Change_leader_change_thyself?cid=other-eml-alt-mkq-mck-oth-1403

 How do these work in practice? Consider the experience of Geoff McDonough, the transformational CEO of Sobi, an emerging pioneer in the treatment of rare diseases. Many credit McDonough’s versatile leadership with successfully integrating two legacy companies and increasing market capitalization from nearly $600 million in 2011 to $3.5 billion today.

From our perspective, his leadership success owes much to his high level of profile awareness. He also displays high profile agility: his skill at calling on the right inner executive at the right time for the right purpose. In other words, he deploys each of his Big Four intentionally and effectively to harness its specific strengths and skills to meet a situation.

McDonough used his inner Dreamer’s imagination to envision the clinical and business impact of Sobi’s biological-development program in neonatology. He saw the possibility of improving the neurodevelopment of tiny, vulnerable newborns and thus of giving them a real chance at a healthy life.

His inner Thinker’s assessment took an unusual perspective at the time. Others didn’t share his evaluation of the viability of integrating one company’s 35-year legacy of biologics development (Kabi Vitrum— the combined group of Swedish pharmaceutical companies Kabi and Vitrum—which merged with Pharmacia and was later acquired, forming Biovitrum in 2001) with another’s 25-year history of commercializing treatments for rare diseases (Swedish Orphan), to lead in a rare-disease market environment with very few independent midsize companies.

Rising to a separate, if related, challenge, McDonough called on his inner Lover to build bridges between the siloed legacy companies. He focused on the people who mattered most to everyone—the patients—and promoted internal talent from both sides, demonstrating his belief that everyone, whatever his or her previous corporate affiliation, could be part of the new “one Sobi.”

Finally, bringing Sobi to its current levels of success required McDonough to tell hard truths and take some painful steps. He called on his inner Warrior to move swiftly, adding key players from the outside to the management team, restructuring the organization, and resolutely promoting an entirely new business model.

2. Develop state awareness: The work of your inner lookout

Profile awareness, as we’ve said, is only the first part of what it takes to look inward when driving organizational change. The next part is state awareness.

Leading yourself means being in tune with what’s happening on the inside, not later but right now. Think about it. People who don’t notice that they are becoming annoyed, judgmental, or defensive in the moment are not making real choices about how to behave. We all need an inner “lookout”—a part of us that notices our inner state—much as all parents are at the ready to watch for threats of harm to their young children.7

For example, a senior executive leading a large-scale transformation remarked that he would like to spend 15 minutes kicking off an important training event for change agents to signal its importance. Objectively speaking, he would probably have the opposite of the intended effect if he said how important the workshop was and then left 15 minutes into it.

What he needed at that moment was the perception of his inner lookout. That perspective would see that he was torn between wanting to endorse the program, on the one hand, and wanting to attend to something else that was also important, on the other. With that clarity, he could make a choice that was sensible and aligned: he might still speak for 15 minutes and then let people know that he wished he could stay longer but had a crucial meeting elsewhere. Equally, he might realize the negative implications of his early departure under any circumstances, decide to postpone the later meeting, and stay another couple of hours. Either way, the inner lookout’s view would lead to more effective leadership behavior.

During a period of organizational change, it’s critical that senior executives collectively adopt the lookout role for the organization as a whole. Yet they often can’t, because they’re wearing rose-tinted glasses that blur the limitations of their leadership style, mask destructive mind-sets at lower levels of the organization, and generally distort what’s going on outside the executive suite. Until we and others confronted one manager we know with the evidence, he had no idea he was interfering with, and undermining, employees through the excessively large number of e-mails he was sending on a daily basis.

Spotting misaligned perceptions requires putting the spotlight on observable behavior and getting enough data to unearth the core issues. Note that traditional satisfaction or employee-engagement surveys—and even 360-degree feedback—often fail to get to the bottom of the problem. A McKinsey diagnostic that reached deep into the workforce—aggregating the responses of 52,240 individuals at 44 companies—demonstrated perception gaps across job levels at 70 percent of the participating organizations. In about two-thirds of them, the top teams were more positive about their own leadership skills than was the rest of the organization. Odds are, in other words, that rigorous organizational introspection will be eye opening for senior leaders.

3. Translate awareness into organizational change

Those open eyes will be better able to spot obstacles to organizational change. Consider the experience of a company that became aware, during a major earnings-improvement effort, that an absence of coaching was stifling progress. On the surface, people said they did not have the time to make coaching a priority. But an investigation of the root causes showed that one reason people weren’t coaching was that they themselves had become successful despite never having been coached. In fact, coaching was associated with serious development needs and seen only as a tool for documenting and firing people. Beneath the surface, managers feared that if they coached someone, others would view that person as a poor performer.

Changing a pervasive element of corporate culture like this depends on a diverse set of interventions that will appeal to different parts of individuals and of the organization. In this case, what followed was a positive internal-communication campaign, achieved with the help of posters positioning star football players alongside their coaches and supported by commentary spelling out the impact of coaching on operating performance at other organizations. At the same time, executives put “the elephant in the room” and acknowledged the negative connotations of coaching, and these confessions helped managers understand and adapt such critical norms. In the end, the actions the executives initiated served to increase the frequency and quality of coaching, with the result that the company was able to move more rapidly toward achieving its performance goals.

4. Start with one change catalyst

While dealing with resistance and fear is often necessary, it’s rarely enough to take an organization to the next level. To go further and initiate collective change, organizations must unleash the full potential of individuals. One person or a small group of trailblazers can provide that catalyst.

For many years, it was widely believed that human beings could not run a mile in less than four minutes. Throughout the 1940s and early 1950s, many runners came close to the four-minute mark, but all fell short. On May 6th, 1954, in Oxford, England, Roger Bannister ran a mile in three minutes and 59 seconds. Only 46 days after Bannister’s historic run, John Landy broke the record again. By 1957, 16 more runners had broken through what once was thought to be an impossible barrier. Today, well over a thousand people have run a mile in less than four minutes, including high-school athletes.

Organizations behave in a similar manner. We often find widely held “four-minute mile” equivalents, like “unattainable growth goals” or “unachievable cost savings” or “unviable strategic changes.” Before the broader organization can start believing that the impossible is possible, one person or a small number of people must embrace a new perspective and set out to disprove the old way of thinking. Bannister, studying to be a doctor, had to overcome physiologists’ claims and popular assumptions that anyone who tried to run faster than 15 miles an hour would die.

Learning to lead yourself requires you to question some core assumptions too, about yourself and the way things work. Like Joseph Campbell’s famous “hero’s journey,” that often means leaving your everyday environment, or going outside your comfort zone, to experience trials and adventures.8 One global company sent its senior leaders to places as far afield as the heart of Communist China and the beaches of Normandy with a view to challenging their internal assumptions about the company’s operating model. The fresh perspectives these leaders gained helped shape their internal values and leadership behavior, allowing them to cascade the lessons through the organization upon their return.

This integration of looking both inward and outward is the most powerful formula we know for creating long-term, high-impact organizational change.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading requires looking inward, a form of meditation, which is not about economic bottom lines. Instead, it is an attempt to become a better person and contribute to making the world a better place. The challenge is that we, as individuals change, but sometimes we are the only one changing. Non-judgement is important. We move at our pace.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 3, 12:49 PM

Fresh leadership perspective matters. Both internal values and external behaviors are modeled within an organization. Creating high impact, long term,  organizational change is not easy but can be attained.

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Sakyong Mipham—Is Meditation Selfish?

Sakyong Mipham—Is Meditation Selfish? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Waylon sits down with Sakyong Mipham, Shambhala Buddhist Teacher, and talks about how meditation can help us create a more enlightened society.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

After watching the videos, the key is the last paragraph where Sakyong is working with people in the helping resolve street violence. If young people learn mindfulness and meditation, it can help them resolve issues in life.

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Thich Nhat Hanh: is mindfulness being corrupted by business and finance?

Thich Nhat Hanh: is mindfulness being corrupted by business and finance? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
The Zen master discusses his advice for Google and other tech giants on being a force for good in the world
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I leave it to a master to speak to the need to promote mindfulness that is about making the world a better place with people who mindfully contribute to that. It is not about corporate bottom lines. That might be a by-product

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Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, April 3, 2:41 AM

He finds better words than I would!

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Mindfulness Is More Than Being Focused

Mindfulness Is More Than Being Focused | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
There is a lot of misunderstanding around what mindfulness means. No doubt we all give meaning to what it means to us in our lives. But as a way of life and h…

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a very good article with a thorough explanation of mindfulness. As someone who worked on this in the latter stages of teaching, it was beneficial. The gentle curiosity and inquiry are hard work in our culture where everything is about immediacy with a sense of panic attached. Chogyam Trungpa and others say the ultimate meditation is in our daily lives rather than in the sitting meditation. The latter is practice for the real thing.

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Practiced Kindness: Day 12.

Practiced Kindness: Day 12. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
I cannot distinguish my closet from my "to go" pile, I see things that I haven't gotten to yet everywhere I look, and I feel as though I have accomplished nothing.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Panic is overrated. During my yoga practice, one thought that skimmed through was the teaching rush I left behind. Being mindful and present made a difference the last year. I think teachers would benefit from meditation and mindfulness.

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Are You Addicted to Being Busy?

Are You Addicted to Being Busy? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Why we should consider the hard truths we mask by staying busy.

 

"It seems to me that too many of us wear busyness as a badge of honor. I’m busy, therefore I’m important and valuable, therefore I’m worthy. And if I’m not busy, forget it. I don’t matter."


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of us are in some fashion. It does not have to be work-related. Think about kids who are so hyper-organized and connected to parents.

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How To Create A Workplace People Love - #Leadership

How To Create A Workplace People Love - #Leadership | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it

od Glassdoor recently announced their sixth annual Employees' Choice Awards, which uses employee ratings to determine the top 50 places to work. Here's...


Via Sandeep Gautam, John Michel, Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach, Robin Brothers
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

People do matter and feel they are heard when they go to a place they love to go to. When this happens, they trust people they work with.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 31, 7:53 PM

People matter is first and foremost. It is more than words. It is embodied in the actions that make people like coming to work and wanting to be there.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, April 1, 6:50 PM

Employee engagement and motivation are some of the biggest challenges facing organisations today. 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 3, 8:20 AM

Key to engagement and enhanced productivity...

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The Power of One Voice. ~ Stephanie Renaud

The Power of One Voice. ~ Stephanie Renaud | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
we live in an age of information. The internet has made the independent dissemination of information possible in a way that has not existed to date. We, as a people, have the power to educate ourselves, to inform ourselves and to raise our voices when the very government that we elected abuses its power, deconstructs our systems and sells our assets to the highest bidder. The problem is that so many people have been lulled both into complacency and political apathy that they have been disempowered. They feel powerless and so they behave in a powerless manner.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do live in a world of information and, at the same time, misinformation. I think many people struggle with figuring out what is accurate in the maelstrom of information. Taking time and being present in our education is important.

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What To Look For In A Mindfulness Teacher

What To Look For In A Mindfulness Teacher | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Mindfulness is all the rage now. This is wonderful, because the practices hold promise for anyone who wishes to try them. But, it's also a very delicate and vulnerable moment, because the demand for mindfulness training outreaches the availability of...

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The advice is very good. I think that mindfulness and meditation should be incorporated into schools, but this article makes it clear we need commitment to practice from the adults. It cannot be a Technique.

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4 Things We Need to Give Up to be Happy.

4 Things We Need to Give Up to be Happy. | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Two people may not see the issue in the same perspective; while I could be right in my world, so could they.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Four very broad things that will help, but are hard to accomplish.

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» The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

» The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Linda Graham, author of Bouncing Back shares with us what we can do to wire a more resilient brain.

Via John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA, David Hain, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Neuroscience is contributing considerably to a greater understanding of what mindfulness and resiliency are all about for people.

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John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, April 4, 6:18 AM

I find this stuff fascinating and here Linda offers some further insights! If you are interested in becoming more resilient as you develop your leadership, have a read!

David Hain's curator insight, April 4, 10:51 AM

Being Mr Bounce! We need to learn more about this, for ourselves, our staff and our kids.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Coaching Leaders
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24 Thought Provoking Questions You Need To Answer To Know Yourself Better

24 Thought Provoking Questions You Need To Answer To Know Yourself Better | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Voltaire, the writer, philosopher, admonishes us to judge a man by his questions rather than his answers. Here are 24 Thought Provoking Questions.

Via The BioSync Team, Ariana Amorim, mytalentbook ltd., David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These questions remind me of the Parker Palmer quote: "Who is the [person] that lives this life?" It is the last one we attend to.

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, April 1, 11:21 AM

A good start to leading a self-examined life.


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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Mindfulness and Meditation
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How Meditation Can Unlock An Artistic Universe

How Meditation Can Unlock An Artistic Universe | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Artist Lia Chavez exists somewhere in the beautiful intersection of performance art, meditation and neuroscience. Known for her durational meditative performances, intense bouts of introspection that can last up to 10 hours, she explores what she dee...

Via The BioSync Team
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meditation is a restorative space which allows time to let things settle and emerge in their. As we let go of things that we grasp at, important and creative moments reveal themselves. It would be interesting to allow teachers and students meditative times in their education.

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, April 3, 12:28 PM

Exploring the artistic mystery of inner and outer space.


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The BioSync Team's curator insight, April 3, 12:33 PM

Meditative art as a way of exploring the nature of the universe.


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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from A Change in Perspective
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The art of mindfulness: What is it and how do you do it?

The art of mindfulness: What is it and how do you do it? | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
News, style and advice for professional women through the filter of success (Looking for a way to be more attentive and fully present all aspects of your life?

Via Brenda Bentley, Emma Sue Prince, ThinDifference, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I don't think it is sitting on your desk, but the article is an easy read with straightforward description.

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Different Images of Knowledge and Perspectives of Pedagogy in Confucius and Socrates

Different Images of Knowledge and Perspectives of Pedagogy in Confucius and Socrates | Leadership and Spirituality | Scoop.it
Confucius and Socrates, two cultural icons of the East and West, both declared they did “not know.” Confucius said, “Am I indeed possessed of knowledge? I do not know.” Socrates said, “As for me, a...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting comparison of two ways of understanding knowing. Is knowing about the practical and wise use of knowledge? Or is about thinking about knowing and steering in a particular direction?

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