Leadership and Networks
649 views | +0 today
Leadership and Networks
What kind of leadership is needed in effective, innovative networks?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

The New Science of Leadership: An Interview with Margaret Wheatley

The New Science of Leadership: An Interview with Margaret Wheatley | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
The website of journalist Scott London

Via Pam John Laflamme, june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Always important insights from Meg Wheatley.

more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:22 PM

I enjoy reading Meg Wheatley's work. It challenges me to think about the way many organizations are run. I don't think much has changed in education since she wrote the original book about new science of leadership and organization.

Howard Silverman's comment, February 24, 2014 7:45 AM
Thx for the link. I wrote about the interview here: http://www.solvingforpattern.org/2014/02/24/design-for-organizational-learning-us-military/
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

Via june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

It is essential that network leadership development learn from constructionism and the maker movement about "tinkering, exploring building, inventing" as they weave networks and help people self-organize.

more...
june holley's curator insight, February 22, 2014 7:11 PM

It is essential that network leadership development learn from constructionism and the maker movement about "tinkering, exploring building, inventing" as they weave networks and help people self-organize.

Peg Gillard's curator insight, February 22, 2014 8:11 PM

More of this in education might begin a long overdue transformation. 

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Assessment
Scoop.it!

Emerging Concepts and Forms of Integral Leadership: Embodying a Radically New Development Paradigm | Integral Leadership Review

Emerging Concepts and Forms of Integral Leadership: Embodying a Radically New Development Paradigm | Integral Leadership Review | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it

A must read on leadership!


Via june holley, Claire Reinelt
more...
june holley's curator insight, February 21, 2014 9:38 AM

A must read on leadership. Lots in here.


 Recent leadership literature reflects this emergence by pointing to new leadership concepts and forms:

  • Shared/distributed/rotating/collective leadership – which acknowledges lateral or peer influence and engages in consultation and coordinated action.
  • Leadership as a relational process rather than a position – emphasizing interpersonal influence, dialogue and mutuality.
  • Complexity leadership – including quantum entanglement, “chaordic” principles, as well as simultaneous top-down, bottom-up, diagonal, and circular change processes.
  • Partnering across organizational and/or sectoral boundaries – such as in open innovation and balanced cross-sector alliances for sustainable development.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 21, 2014 1:36 PM

There are interesting and wide-ranging references i.e. Ron Heifetz and Joseph Campbell. That makes this intriguing.

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

Wave Rider: Leadership for High Performance in a Self-Organizing World: Harrison Owen: 9781576756171: Amazon.com: Books

Wave Rider: Leadership for High Performance in a Self-Organizing World

Product by Brand: Berrett-Koehler Publishers ~ Harrison Owen (author) More about this product
List Price: $24.95
Price: $23.22
You Save: $1.73 (7%)
Wave Rider: Leadership for High Performance in a Self-Organizing World [Harrison Owen] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Via june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Classic on network leadership.

more...
june holley's curator insight, February 22, 2014 7:26 PM

A classic on network leadership by the creator of the open space concept.

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Self-organizing and Systems Mapping
Scoop.it!

Network Society Catalyzes Social Movements

Network Society Catalyzes Social Movements | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Read about how network society, the interactions between technology and people, has brought people together to create major social movements.

Via Cathryn Wellner, Patricia Thompson, Liz Rykert, june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

I just got a copy and will summarize soon.

more...
Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:24 AM

Thanks Pat Thompson for finding this gem. Interesting to see integration of movements and networks.

june holley's curator insight, February 23, 2014 1:22 PM

Looking forward to reading this.

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

Socialogy: An Interview With Eugene Kim

Socialogy: An Interview With Eugene Kim | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it

I met Eugene at least five years ago when he was working at Blue Oxen, a social consultancy, and we’ve remain aware of each other’s work without ever actually working together. So I am remedying that in this minimal way, with an interview.


About Eugene Kim





Eugene is the co-founder of Groupaya, and his bio there is great, so I pulled a few bits of it:




Eugene hates the idea of putting people into boxes, which is good, because we can’t put him in one. he has worked as a writer and an editor, a researcher and an analyst, and a programmer and a manager. In 2002, he decided to bring all of these skills and interests to bear on his true passion: collaboration for social good. 


He believes that groups are smarter than individuals and that tools should serve people, not the other way around. When Eugene speaks, people listen. Sometimes he shares an insight, more often he raises an essential question, always he helps groups get clear.




The Interview


Stowe Boyd: I read your recent post, The Real Importance of Networks: Understanding Power. You wrote, ‘Networks are special because they are a lens that help us better understand power.’ And your presentation is that organizations exist to make the latent power of the people in the organization greater than linear.


Organizational structure is a shortcut. The problem is that shortcuts don’t always prove to be a good idea. - Eugene Kim


Eugene Kim: That’s the theory behind organizational structure at least. Ideally, in any group, you want the right hierarchies to emerge. For example, if I’m out in the woods with no food or water, I want to defer to the person in the group who has the best survival skills. And, if it turns out that that person proves time and again to be the best suited for making decisions, it makes sense to give that person some kind of formal authority — perhaps in the form of a leadership title — so that you’re not having to figure out the best person for every situation.


In other words, organizational structure is a shortcut. The problem is that shortcuts don’t always prove to be a good idea. The group promotes the person who was good at surviving in the forest into some kind of leadership role, but suddenly, you’re not in the forest anymore, you’re in New York City. Is that person still right for that role? And if not, how do you get the right person into that job?


Max Weber said that all organizational forms are destined to become more and more bureaucratic. Structure begets rigidity. A network-oriented mindset helps you fight that rigidity. In today’s world, that’s not only desirable, it’s necessary.


SB: You make the power relationship seem like a meritocratic decision of the group. And the legitimacy of a business elite has to be based on productivity, at face value. However, there is a great deal of oligarchic control in organizations, where those who are founders, owners, or more senior are in charge, but the conventional rationale for them having leadership roles is less about performance justifying their positions than the naturalness of hierarchy and people’s desire to be told what to do. I constantly encounter people that say things like ‘There we will always have hiearchy’ without actually trying to prove it.


EK: Most people’s experiences with organizations are with a certain kind of hierarchy, and so when it comes to creating our organizations, the natural thing to do is to default to what you already know, even if those experiences are wretched. It’s habit, and it’s human.


Max Weber said that all organizational forms are destined to become more and more bureaucratic. Structure begets rigidity. A network-oriented mindset helps you fight that rigidity. In today’s world, that’s not only desirable, it’s necessary. - Eugene Kim


I was always curious about why Wikipedia is so bureaucratic under the surface. Again, Weber says that it’s inevitable for all groups, but it didn’t make sense to me with Wikipedia. This is a community of people who live and breathe networks and self-organization, and who frankly are a bit counter-culture.


When I led the Wikimedia strategy process in 2010, I made it a side project to try to figure this out. After talking with a lot of folks, I came up with the following hypothesis. Most people who edit Wikipedia are in their teens and 20s. Many of them have only had experience being in one kind of institution — schools. When the community started experiencing the challenges of scale, they naturally dug into their own experiences for the solution rather than starting with base principles. Voila! Bureaucracy!


Starting from base principles is really hard. It requires a tremendous amount of discipline and a comfort level with uncertainty. But if you truly care about creating high-performance groups — and not everyone does — it’s necessary.


SB: I have said for years, ‘I am made greater by the sum of my connections and so are my connections’. A slightly different take on your formulation about the purpose of organizations is that each individual opts to connect to others to have the opportunity to cooperate with them, and through those networks advance their personal agenda. So, this power may be accumulation of the personal aspirations of the individuals, rather than a property of the disembodied organization.


EK: Wow, we’re really getting into some deep philosophical stuff here! I don’t know what the purpose of organizations are. I’ve already cited Max Weber, so I’m starting to get out of my comfort zone.


Here’s what I believe. I believe that individuals want to feel alive in everything that they do. Most of us do not feel alive. Self-help is a $11 billion industry, on par with the movie industry. We spend at least half of our waking lives at work, mostly in organizations. Most people feel like zombies while they’re at work. That’s not a good thing.


When you feel connected to other people, you feel alive. When you feel like you’re part of something bigger that makes you yourself feel bigger, stronger, more powerful, you feel alive.


When you’re not able to bring your whole self to work, when you’re part of something that’s constantly getting in your way rather than making you more powerful, that’s when you start to feel like a zombie. That’s the cost of rigidity.


SB: I completely agree with that sentiment. I once said,




Whatever else social business comes to be, it has to be based on how people operate when they feel most free, most creative, most engaged, and most needed. We have to build a way of working where the people doing the work matter as much as the work being done.


Whatever else, social business must be that.




In each Socialogy interview, the third questions relates to the concept that we are not applying the newest findings from science in the business setting, like cognitive science, anthropology, or neuroeconomics. What fields do you think are most relevant — and underutilized — in business?


Whatever else social business comes to be, it has to be based on how people operate when they feel most free, most creative, most engaged, and most needed. We have to build a way of working where the people doing the work matter as much as the work being done. - Stowe Boyd


EK: Sports, music — fields where we have clear models of high-performance groups. Business has long found sports to be a kindred spirit, yet two of the most important aspects of sports (and music) have yet to see widespread adoption in the business world. I’m talking about coaching and practice.


All of the top teams and the top athletes in the world have coaches. Same goes for musicians. What’s the percentage in the business world?


And how about practice? I know you’ll appreciate this, because of your background in martial arts. In sports and in music, you spend 90 percent of your time practicing and maybe 10 percent of your time performing. In business, the numbers are reversed. We pay lip service to the importance of certain fundamentals, like listening, but how often do we practice those things intentionally in safe spaces with feedback? You can practice listening — musicians do this constantly.


SB: Yes, I agree about high performance, but in areas outside of sports and martial arts a high performers share the characteristic of creating loose connections with lots of potential cooperators. And then when some new threat or opportunity comes along they rapidly compose networks and pull them into an ad hoc advisory or working group to figure out what to do. I guess that’s a kind of practice, too.


Eugene, thanks for your time.


EK: Not only is it a practice, it’s something that can be practiced. Why must we wait for high-stakes situations and then try to do these things cold, especially if those things feel unnatural? We need to be creating more safe opportunities to practice these so that it doesn’t feel so uncomfortable when the stakes are high.


In many ways, the Internet has been that space. I believe we’re experiencing a shift right now, because the first generation to grow up with widespread connectivity is now part of the workforce, and they’ve had many years to practice this kind of behavior. This is a good thing.


Stowe, thanks for having me! Always enjoy our conversations!


This post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. I’ve been compensated to contribute to this program, but the opinions expressed in this post are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.


Via june holley
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

Action Learning Workshops | The Center for Excellence in Public Leadership (CEPL) | The George Washington University

Action Learning Workshops | The Center for Excellence in Public Leadership (CEPL) | The George Washington University | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Art of Hosting
Scoop.it!

Accentuate the Positive with Appreciative Inquiry

Accentuate the Positive with Appreciative Inquiry | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Sara Orem current focus is on the development and use of positive methods including Appreciative Inquiry in coaching and group processes.

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

Is 'cultural fit' a cop out? In general, yes.

Is 'cultural fit' a cop out? In general, yes. | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
It has become a common practice to preach and practice the dogma of cultural fit. The premise is that in order for a company to be successful, individuals have to share values and behaviors to meld into an effective workforce. Therefore, it  would seem to be good policy to identify what those values and behaviors…

Via june holley
more...
june holley's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:27 AM

"

  • The new way of work is based on connectives — loose and shifting networks of highly autonomous cooperators — rather than collectives — tight and static hierarchic teams where people work in narrowly-defined roles.
Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

What is Transformation? | Social Transformation Project

What is Transformation? | Social Transformation Project | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

“Transformation is profound, fundamental change, altering the very nature of something. Transformational change is both radical and sustainable. Something that is transformed can never go back to exactly what it was before.”

– excerpt from What is Transformation?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

Applying Social Network Analysis to Online Communications Networks | Leadership Learning Community

Applying Social Network Analysis to Online Communications Networks | Leadership Learning Community | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Art of Hosting
Scoop.it!

Why leadership-development programs fail

Why leadership-development programs fail | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Sidestepping four common mistakes can help companies develop stronger and more capable leaders, save time and money, and boost morale. A McKinsey Quarterly article.

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Culture Change
Scoop.it!

Manifesto | Disrupt Magazine.

Manifesto | Disrupt Magazine. | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it

Via Liz Rykert
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Lots of things here to add to our ideas about network leadership.

more...
Liz Rykert's curator insight, January 21, 2014 9:44 AM

Great set of simple rules from the people at Disrupt Magazine http://disruptmgzn.com/ . Feels like a great set of simple rules to shift culture (which often started by dirstrupting or creatively destrying certain practices or behaviours). 

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

Collaborative Resilience: Moving Through Crisis to Opportunity: Bruce Evan Goldstein: 9780262516457: Amazon.com: Books

Collaborative Resilience: Moving Through Crisis to Opportunity

~ More about this product
List Price: $29.00
Price: $23.20
You Save: $5.80 (20%)
Collaborative Resilience: Moving Through Crisis to Opportunity [Bruce Evan Goldstein] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Crisis--whether natural disaster, technological failure, economic collapse, or shocking acts of violence--can offer opportunities for collaboration

Via june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Excellent information about network leadership and collaboration. 

more...
june holley's curator insight, February 21, 2014 8:53 AM

Lots of excellent material in here. Esp in intro and conclusion

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Culture Change
Scoop.it!

Understanding the Future of Work: 8 Traits of Collaborative Leadership ... - Business 2 Community

Understanding the Future of Work: 8 Traits of Collaborative Leadership ... - Business 2 Community | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it

With the collaborative economy pushing businesses into the next phase of social business, executives must learn how to motivate, encourage and lead employees [and customers too] in a way that adds value to everyone involved in the collaborative work environment. Employees and customers are collaborating on products, services and content more than ever before. In preparation for the collaborative economy, consider what role do executives play in fostering a collaborative environment when employees and customers can receive what they need from each other?

 


Via jean lievens, Kevin Jones, june holley, Liz Rykert
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Nice chart!

more...
Rikke Bräuner's curator insight, December 6, 2013 5:31 AM

Easy to illustrate, more difficult to live. Start with yourself and support diverse team members in collaborating, sharing info, believing in own ideas and come forward with them, participate and feel responsible in brainstorming and taking on team responsibility and be willing to change how they work. Discuss with your teams how they individually can come forward in these areas in their own individual way.

Monica Ambrosini's curator insight, December 6, 2013 1:13 PM

Despite a bit too simple it's a concise and effective snapshot..

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 19, 2014 1:14 PM

Effective collaboration is about handling the tension that emerges from integrating personal and collective. It is about positive uses of power and its flow through the collective and each person.

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Civic Food Networks
Scoop.it!

7 keys to guiding an open network

7 keys to guiding an open network | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Since the railroads introduced them in the 1870’s, hierarchical organizations have dominated our economic landscape. They have shaped our thinking and behavior. Now that is changing. Open, loosely ...

Via Lisa Trocchia
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

OpenStudy: Study Together

OpenStudy: Study Together | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
Ask. Answer. Understand. Get real-time study help. Join the world's largest study group.

Via june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

The importune of network leaders learning to structure study groups for learning.

more...
Liz Rykert's comment, February 23, 2014 9:26 AM
Like this insight about how Network leaders need to be constantly learning. Having a way to help people learn both what is happening within/across the network and beyond key.
Liz Rykert's comment, February 23, 2014 9:26 AM
Have you found some specific elements or attributes people should focus on?
june holley's comment, February 23, 2014 12:35 PM
And the big challenge is how people have time to facilitate learning - not quite at the place where everyone knows and is committed to co-leading. And then how does what a study group learns get fed back into the larger network.
Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

What’s in Your Leadership Development Toolbox?

What’s in Your Leadership Development Toolbox? | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
  The practice of leadership development has evolved considerably. Years ago, the focus was on the individual: up-and-coming executives attended classro
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

GREAT CHART ON MANY DIFFERENT KINDS OF LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from networks and network weaving
Scoop.it!

RSA - ChangeMakers


Via june holley
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Identifying changemakers and supporting them.

more...
june holley's curator insight, February 14, 2014 8:15 PM

The full report on the RSA Changemakers project - all about identifying positive change makers and their networks.

Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

Promoting and assessing value creation in communities and networks: a conceptual framework | Better Evaluation

Promoting and assessing value creation in communities and networks: a conceptual framework | Better Evaluation | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
more...
Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:32 AM

I am always looking for better ways to measure things like networks that can sometimes be difficult to get right - this looks useful.

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

How to Self-Assemble and Sustain a Self-Organising Team

How to Self-Assemble and Sustain a Self-Organising Team | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
A report on recent commentary by Mike Cohn, Thomas Cagley and others on the topic of team self-assembly and sustaining successful self-organising teams.

Via june holley
more...
june holley's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:00 AM

Tons of great information here: "team formation is a critical factor for the sustained success of a self-organizing team"

Rescooped by Leadership Learning Community from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
"Critical Thinking" may sound like an obnoxious buzzword from liberal arts schools, but it's actually a useful skill. Critical thinking just means absorbing important information and using that to form a decision or opinion of your own--rather than just spouting off what you hear others say. This doesn't always come naturally to us, but luckily, it's something you can train yourself to do better.


Critical thinking doesn't end. The more knowledge you cultivate, the better you'll become at thinking about it. It's navel gazing in that you're constantly thinking about thinking, but the end result is a brain that automatically forms better arguments, focused ideas, and creative solutions to problems.



Via Gust MEES, Beth Kanter, june holley
more...
Brent MacKinnon's curator insight, February 9, 2014 8:18 AM

A very practical description with examples of ways to become better in your critical thinking. A good primer for sense making as part of the PKM framework.

Terry Doherty's curator insight, February 15, 2014 8:00 PM

"Navel gazing." I haven't heard that term in ages ... and don't do it near enough.

 

Todd Bratcher's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:46 PM

Critical thinking means to ask questions that need to be asked. it involves finding the significance in every piece of information you come across and formulating opinions and plans of action. You have to ask the tough questions and the best one to start with is "Why?" Critical thinking is about being curious and allowing your sense of curiosity to follow the "why".Often times following the why will lead to finding the truths and finding lies. Critical thinking is also about honing in ones BS detector. Take time to analyze information before accepting it's credibility.

Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

How is network leadership different from organizational leadership and why is understanding this difference important? | Leadership Learning Community

How is network leadership different from organizational leadership and why is understanding this difference important? | Leadership Learning Community | Leadership and Networks | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leadership Learning Community
Scoop.it!

Resilience: Why Things Bounce Back: Andrew Zolli, Ann Marie Healy: 9781451683813: Amazon.com: Books

Resilience: Why Things Bounce Back

Product by Brand: Simon Schuster ~ Ann Marie Healy (author) More about this product
List Price: $16.00
Price: $12.48
You Save: $3.52 (22%)
Resilience: Why Things Bounce Back [Andrew Zolli, Ann Marie Healy] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. What causes one system to break down and another to rebound? Are we merely subject to the whim of forces beyond our control?
Leadership Learning Community's insight:

Lots here for network leaders. Highly recommend.

more...
No comment yet.