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It’s the 80 percent that counts | Aspire-CS

It’s the 80 percent that counts | Aspire-CS | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

t has been said that we remember 80% of the feelings in a conversation but only 20% of what was actually said. It doesn’t matter whether the conversation was uplifting or a downer, we seem to be wired to remember well what we felt.

 

As a leader, you’re being watched closely and although your words are important, it’s how you say them (the emotion behind them) that will be recalled and make the biggest impact on others.

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Leadership Advice
Leadership and Management Advice for Executives in Small to Mid-Size Organizations
Curated by Bob Corlett
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How to Regularly Achieve the Impossible - Lessons Learned from the SEED Foundation

How to Regularly Achieve the Impossible - Lessons Learned from the SEED Foundation | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
We can all learn from the rare organizations that have figured out how to regularly achieve the impossible — without burning out their team or setting people up to fail.
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In Performance Management, the Bell Curve is a Dangerous Myth

In Performance Management, the Bell Curve is a Dangerous Myth | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

There is a long standing belief in business that people performance follows the Bell Curve (also called the Normal Distribution). This belief has been embedded in many business practices: performance appraisals, compensation models, and even how we get graded in school. (Remember "grading by the curve?") 


Research shows that this statistical model, while easy to understand, does not accurately reflect the way people performAs a result, HR departments and business leaders inadvertently create agonizing problems with employee performance and happiness.


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Cheaters ... Win? Why Systems to Prevent Deception Don’t Work - Knowledge@Wharton

Cheaters ... Win? Why Systems to Prevent Deception Don’t Work - Knowledge@Wharton | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Guilt and remorse are poor safeguards against cheating. In fact, according to recent Wharton research, people get a high from breaking the rules that has nothing to do with the tangible reward they are trying to attain.
Bob Corlett's insight:

Fascinating >>  “Control systems to ensure people are working the correct number of hours, or doing the work they’re supposed to do instead of surfing the Internet – these may have the reverse effect. People perceive them as a challenge to overcome."

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What Bosses Should Never Ask Employees to Do

What Bosses Should Never Ask Employees to Do | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Bob Corlett's insight:

Jeff Haden highlights the incredibly common ways that good people subtly abuse the power of being a boss.  

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Your Least Engaged Employees Might Be Your Top Performers

Your Least Engaged Employees Might Be Your Top Performers | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
New research points to a horrifying possibility: your low performers may be the ones who love their jobs the most.
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Leadership Conversations - Knowledge@Wharton

Leadership Conversations -  Knowledge@Wharton | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

"...a key challenge to an employee rising up the organizational ranks is to find the proper balance between managment and leadership. 


Management is intrinsically result-oriented. Managers develop work schedules, set goals and delegate responsibility. They are there to answer questions and to assist employees in completing their tasks. Their orientation is tactical and geared to solving problems...


Leadership, on the other hand, is more process-oriented. Just as important as meeting deadlines is how the group gets there. If a bottom-line goal is achieved without involving and developing the entire team, the organization will not be prepared to meet future challenges and changing circumstances.


.... A connected and aligned team is one that is constantly learning, and thus better able to adapt to unforeseen changes. While managers are more likely to be answering questions, a great leader routinely asks them. Their orientation is strategic rather than tactical, with an emphasis not so much on solving problems as on generating possibilities.

Bob Corlett's insight:

I like this useful distinction of asking questions versus answering them.

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Sometimes Negative Feedback is Best

Sometimes Negative Feedback is Best | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Positive feedback is better for novices. Negative, for experts.
Bob Corlett's insight:

Feedback is not one-size-fits-all simplistic. Research reveals what type of feedback works best for what kinds of people. 

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Management Is (Still) Not Leadership

Management Is (Still) Not Leadership | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
After years of debate, people still confuse these ideas - at their peril.
Bob Corlett's insight:

This is a good brief piece on a critical distinction that is often overlooked. Leadership vs Management is not an either/or choice. Both are necessary.

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How Leaders Make Work Much Less Fun - Forbes

How Leaders Make Work Much Less Fun - Forbes | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Too many executives don't realize that their organizations are anti-motivation sinkholes. But you can see it and stop it.
Bob Corlett's insight:

The research is in, to deeply engage your best people, they need to be able to make progress in meaningful work. Simple to say, hard to do. 

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John Michel's curator insight, January 18, 2013 12:01 AM

A multi-year research project involving hundreds of companies discovered that of all the events that can deeply engage people in their jobs, the single most important is making progress in meaningful work

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John E. Michel is a widely recognized expert in culture, strategy & individual and organizational change. An accomplished unconventional leader and proven status quo buster, he has successfully led several multi-billion dollar transformation efforts and his award-winning work has been featured in a wide variety of articles and journals, including the Harvard Business Review. You are encouraged to learn more about John at his website, www.MedicoreMe.com

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11 Books Every Young Leader Must Read

11 Books Every Young Leader Must Read | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

This is not a bad reading list for new leaders, but the comments are the real gold, lots of great recommendations in there. 

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The Top 5 Reasons Your Decisions Fail You - Forbes

The Top 5 Reasons Your Decisions Fail You - Forbes | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
What makes bad decisions, and how can you avoid them? Learn the 5 top reasons decisions fail you, and the lessons they teach you about effective decision making.
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Forgive and Remember: How a Good Boss Responds to Mistakes

Forgive and Remember: How a Good Boss Responds to Mistakes | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

Failure is inevitable, so the key to success is to be good at learning from it. The ability to capitalize on hard-won experience is a hallmark of the greatest organizations — the ones that are most adept at turning knowledge into action, that are best at developing and implementing creative ideas, that engage in evidence-based (rather than faith- or fear-based) management, and that are populated with the best bosses.

 

Failure instructs. In fact, there is no learning without failure — and this includes failing at dangerous things like surgery and flying planes. Discovery of the moves that work well is always accompanied by discovery of moves that don't.

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Struggling Against the Invisible Bureaucracy of Organizational Culture | Leader's Beacon

Struggling Against the Invisible Bureaucracy of Organizational Culture | Leader's Beacon | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

Most managers struggle against the flow of overly complex structures and systems and are often frustrated by an invisible force that undermines their attempts to affect positive change. Their instincts tell them that the organization’s culture and people are preventing them from getting the results they want, but “culture” remains one of the least understood aspects of organizational life. Organizational culture often acts like an Invisible Bureaucracy™ that frustrates and undermines effective business performance

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Parkinson's Law

Parkinson's Law | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

"It is a commonplace observation that work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion. "

Bob Corlett's insight:

A brilliantly written and timeless essay on how administrative tasks, left unchecked, will continue to grow at a predictable rate. (written in 1955)

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The ‘Moneyball’ Approach to Hiring CEOs - Knowledge@Wharton

The ‘Moneyball’ Approach to Hiring CEOs - Knowledge@Wharton | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Instead of throwing money at “superstars,” companies should use quantifiable measures to pick the right CEO, according to recent Wharton research.
Bob Corlett's insight:

This article is pure gold, with so many valuable points.. Among them: 

The argument for phone interviews:

“The biggest shortcoming of executive recruitment, the researchers say, is the failure to apply “Meehl’s Rule:” Never meet a job candidate until you decide to make them an offer. The late Paul E. Meehl, a psychologist from the University of Minnesota, advised using relevant, quantifiable factors to judge candidates. Instead, height, body build, gender, accent and looks often get considered"


The argument for getting an award (as an employee) vs not believing it when hiring:

“The authors cite a study showing that CEOs who won awards in the press saw a marked increase in pay, while similar CEOs (runners- up for the awards) saw little increase. Three years later, there was a large gulf between what the winners and non-winners earned. However, the stocks of the firms controlled by the “superstars” actually underperformed compared to those of the firms run by the non-winners.”

 

Looking at job performance in context:

“Executives ... are often held personally responsible for the success or failure of the organizations they represent without consideration of external factors, such as the state of the economy. They point to a study in which CEOs of oil companies that performed strongly were compensated well, despite evidence that the profits resulted from fluctuations in the price of crude oil.”

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The Four Secrets to Employee Engagement

The Four Secrets to Employee Engagement | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

Recently, Bain & Company, in conjunction with Netsurvey, analyzed responses from 200,000 employees across 40 companies in 60 countries and found several troubling trends:


  • Engagement scores decline with employee tenure, meaning that employees with the deepest knowledge of the company typically are the least engaged.
  • Engagement scores decline as you go down the org chart, so highly engaged senior executives are likely to underestimate the discontent on the front lines.
  • Engagement levels are lowest among sales and service employees, who have the most interactions with customers.


Yet some companies manage to buck these trends, here's how


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Smart Leaders Have Protégés

Smart Leaders Have Protégés | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Build your empire, one talented young person at a time.
Bob Corlett's insight:

"Sponsorship is about taking calculated risks. Why do it? Because...no one person can maintain both breadth and depth of knowledge across fields and functions. But she can put together a posse whose expertise is a quick IM away."


In a nutshell, why this is great advice for all leaders looking to build a stronger organization.

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Why Your Company's Worst Performers Are Happy As Clams | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

Why Your Company's Worst Performers Are Happy As Clams | Fast Company | Business + Innovation | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
It seems paradoxical but the worse performing a worker the happier they are. Here's how to figure out where they're hiding and give your organization'...
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Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK - Forbes

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK - Forbes | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are very different skills. Yet most of the time, we expect corporate executives to wow us with their detail-oriented approach to management and then suddenly metamorphose into visionary leaders the moment they’re promoted. It doesn’t usually work out, says Annmarie Neal, the author of the forthcoming Leading from the Edge (ASTD Press, 2013).


A leader is somebody who sees opportunity and puts change in motion. A manager is somebody who follows that leader and sees how to structure things to create value for the company,” she says. “I’ve found that the best leaders weren’t really good managers.

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donhornsby's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:33 AM

(From the article): In a study she conducted when she was a top executive at a Fortune 500 firm, she discovered that “people who were out of the box, pushing the edge, thinking in terms of the horizon…got lower [performance] ratings than the people who could show crazy execution on nonsense.” It’s a huge mistake – and a missed opportunity – for corporations, she says. You have to be able to evaluate managers and leaders on the criteria that matter most for each: “You’ve got to change that system. You can’t really want a system where you say, ‘I prefer you to drive nonsense…and that matters more than the person who puts their neck on the line.’”

ManagingAmericans's comment, February 18, 2013 9:39 AM
Great insights Don. It is amazing to me how often we try and apply a preconceived box for a specific role and expect everyone to fit within that box.
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 19, 2013 4:34 AM

Well, interesting... I agree in a very limited degree... or rather not... I don't think that the B-W picture (either/or) is the adequate approach... I believe in the right proportion... In real big organizations, where the action radius of the leader is really broad and if, additionally, the strategic situation is on a very high level volatile might be that the leader-proportion is approaching the 100% but normally I don't think that Mintzberg's thoughts about the leadership/management (worth to read some of his books) has been so much the past...

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How Great Leaders Communicate

You’ve just been promoted into one of your organization’s Big Jobs. Now you’ve got an impressive office, a hefty budget and vast expectations about how you will lead dozens or even
Bob Corlett's insight:

Shrewd advice, with vivid examples and clear writing--the hallmark of a George Anders article. 

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Consider Not Setting Goals in 2013

Consider Not Setting Goals in 2013 | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it
Goals have counterproductive side effects. There's a better way to hold yourself accountable.
Bob Corlett's insight:

I have long resisted making New Year's rsolutions (or predictions). Peter Bregmans suggests that instead of identifying goals, consider identifying areas of focus. A goal defines an outcome you want to achieve; an area of focus establishes activities you want to spend your time doing. A goal is a result; an area of focus is a path. A goal points to a future you intend to reach; an area of focus settles you into the present.

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7 things leaders should learn to say

Every one of us can do with an extra dose of humility and self-awareness to remind us that we're not always the insanely great business leaders, executives, managers and workers our oversized egos tell us we are. Along those lines, here are seven phrases you should learn to say -- and mean.

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Good Fail, Bad Fail: What Made Caterpillar And Unmade Enron

Good Fail, Bad Fail: What Made Caterpillar And Unmade Enron | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

There are many background similarities between Ken Lay, former CEO of Enron, and Jim Owens, former CEO of Caterpillar Inc, but how they handled mistakes was quite different. Owens achieved numerous successes in large part by learning from his own mistakes as well as the mistakes of others, In 2001 Lay attempted to hide his mistakes and those of others and as a consequence went from the top of the charts to ending as one of the most catastrophically flawed leaders in US business history.

 

So why is it that we don't we embrace challenges and become accepting of mistakes, learning from them and ultimately growing from them? And if learning from mistakes has so much value, why is it taboo to even talk about mistakes in the context of business and leadership? The answers aren't hard to find.

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Ten Ways to Get People to Change

Ten Ways to Get People to Change | Leadership Advice | Scoop.it

How do you get leaders, employees, customers — and even yourself — to change behaviors? Executives can change strategy, products and processes until they're blue in the face, but real change doesn't take hold until people actually change what they do.

Here is a good list of 10 approaches that seem to work

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3 Ways To Make Everyone Around You Smarter

Leaders accept and act on the paradox of power: you become more powerful when you give your own power away. Long before empowerment was written into the popular vocabulary, exemplary leaders understood how important it was for their constituents to feel strong, capable, and efficacious. Constituents who feel weak, incompetent, and insignificant will consistently underperform; they want to flee the organization and are ripe for disenchantment, even revolution.

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