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Economic Treadmill: Why We Are Destined to Burn Out

Economic Treadmill: Why We Are Destined to Burn Out | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

The amount of stress we endure is increasing because of our focus on efficiency. Stress is caused by uncertainty, more specifically, by doubts in our ability to handle something. As machines and computers handle more things that are predictable and certain, we are pressured to deal with more things that are unpredictable and uncertain. This inevitably leads to more stress. As soon as our tasks become predictable and certain, we automate them using our technology. The result of this process of streamlining is that we are increasingly called upon to use our, what I would call, irrational abilities, such as instincts, sensibilities, creativities, and interpersonal skills. These things are, by nature, unpredictable.

 

Take stock trading, for instance. When there were no computers to process the trades, the number of trades you could do in a day was limited...


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Invitación Vídeo Tour Campus UAPNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c)

Invitación Vídeo Tour Campus UAPNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Vídeo-Tour 100% GRATIS por CAMPUS UAPNL  Acompáñame DENTRO del CAMPUS y comprueba la CALIDAD de nuestros PROGRAMAS  Obtén tu CERTIFICACIÓN en PNL, fácil y
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Vídeo Tour 100% GRATUITO por el CAMPUS UAPNL. Acompáñame DENTRO del CAMPUS y comprueba la CALIDAD de nuestros PROGRAMAS: http://www.uapnl.com/invitacion-video-tour-campus-uapnl/

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Design Thinking: Select the Right Team Members and Start Facilitating

Design Thinking: Select the Right Team Members and Start Facilitating | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Some of the aims of Design Thinking's approach are to create:

greater inclusivenessbetter team cohesionhigher levels of collaboration and interactionincreased creative confidenceEveryone thinks, feels, and experiences things differently. Differences are what we need. Knowing that certain activities are not natural for everyone means that some preparation, explanation, and trust-building, before the launch, can go a long way towards preventing people from jumping ship.
Some of the obstacles the process aims to overcome:

Fear of failureIntimidationLow self esteemHierarchyCreative blocksBlind spotsSpecialisation bias

Via Edwin Rutsch
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(Empathic Leadership) Why the Empathetic Leader Is the Best Leader

(Empathic Leadership) Why the Empathetic Leader Is the Best Leader | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
It’s All About Empathy
Sinek says researching his latest book has even changed the way he conducts his own life and business. “The lesson I’m learning is that I’m useless by myself. My success hinges entirely on the people I work with—the people who enlist themselves to join me in my vision. And it’s my responsibility to see that they’re working at their best capacity.”

Empathy—the ability to recognize and share other people’s feelings—is the most important instrument in a leader’s toolbox, Sinek believes. It can be expressed in the simple words, “Is everything OK?”

It’s what effective leaders ask an employee, instead of commanding “Clean out your desk” when he or she starts slacking off. It’s what you ask a client when a once-harmonious relationship gets rocky. “I really believe in quiet confrontation,” Sinek says. “If you had a good working relationship with someone and it’s suddenly gone sour, I believe in saying something like, ‘When we started we were both so excited, and it’s become really difficult now. Are you OK? What’s changed?’

 

Shelley Levitt

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A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders

A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The prevailing logic is that leaders are responsible for results. Therefore we should evaluate leaders as follows:

Good results = good leader
Average results = average leader
Bad results = bad leader
Simple and straightforward.

But not very accurate.

Good leaders will sometimes fail.

Bad leaders do sometimes succeed.

So why does this belief persist?

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David Hain's curator insight, March 21, 6:16 AM

"One-dimensional focus produces one-dimensional leaders" ~ Scott Mabry, aka @soul2work

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 21, 2:24 PM

Balanced scorecards can be good if they are flexible enough to handle business today.  Most are not.

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How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs

How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
CCL’s study of leadership development program alumni found the degree of support from participants’ bosses for their development activities made a significant impact on several outcomes. Selfawareness, leadership capability, leadership effectiveness, and engagement were
all significantly improved when participants had the support of their bosses.

For organizations investing in the development of their people—whether individual contributors or c-suite executives—this research means that participant engagement with a leadership development program is not the only factor influencing outcomes. Maximizing the value of leadership development initiatives requires organizations and their training and development partners to constructively engage bosses as well as participants.

This has important implications for individual leadership development program design as well as broader organizational and leadership development efforts. Companies are increasingly requiring a clear return on investment from leadership development programs and looking for ways to ensure such initiatives have a sustained impact. Engaging bosses is a key ingredient in that effort.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 22, 5:38 AM

Don't just spend leadership development money on those hi-potentials. Brief,debrief and coach them! Your follow-up is crucial!

donhornsby's curator insight, March 22, 8:18 AM
The study suggests that when it comes to boss support, a little goes a long way.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 23, 11:21 AM

Title says it all because it is true.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Good News For A Change
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Taking Feedback Impersonally – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium

Taking Feedback Impersonally – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
This was first published on my mailing list The Looking Glass. Every week, I answer a reader’s question. I recently had a situation where my team was re-doing something I had worked on for a couple…

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6 TED Talks on the benefits of failure

6 TED Talks on the benefits of failure | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Failure isn’t fun, but it is an opportunity to learn, reflect and regroup. These insightful talks can help you pick yourself up after a setback and grow toward success.

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How Long Does it Actually Take to Form a New Habit? Backed by Science. 

How Long Does it Actually Take to Form a New Habit? Backed by Science.  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
How long does it really take to form a new habit? Read this article to learn the science behind habit formation and how to use it best.

Via Ariana Amorim, Bobby Dillard
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How Long Does it Actually Take to Form a New Habit? Backed by Science.
 
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donhornsby's curator insight, March 8, 9:47 AM
At the end of the day, how long it takes to form a particular habit doesn't really matter that much. Whether it takes 50 days or 500 days, you have to put in the work either way. The only way to get to Day 500 is to start with Day 1. So forget about the number and focus on doing the work.
 
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Habits: The Definitive Guide to Lasting Change

Habits: The Definitive Guide to Lasting Change | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it




Everything you need to know about how to create good habits and break bad habits. Discover the best habit apps, books, and services. Plus, get a FREE ebook!


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Exponential growth devours and corrupts – Signal v. Noise

Exponential growth devours and corrupts – Signal v. Noise | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
There is no higher God in Silicon Valley than growth. No sacrifice too big for its craving altar. As long as you keep your curve exponential, all your sins will be forgotten at the exit.
It’s through this exponential lens that eating the world becomes not just a motto for software at large, but a mission for every aspiring unicorn and their business model. “Going viral” suddenly takes on a shockingly honest and surprisingly literal meaning.
The goal of the virus is to spread as fast as it can and corrupt as many other cells as possible. How on earth did such a debauched zest become the highest calling for a whole generation of entrepreneurs?
Through systemic incentives, that’s how. And no incentive is currently stronger than that of THE POTENTIAL.

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Exponential growth devours and corrupts – Signal v. Noise
 
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David Hain's curator insight, March 1, 5:29 AM

Well thought through rant against the God of growth, and a plea for a more ethical alternative!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 1, 5:46 PM

This is very true.  We have seen it a number of times but it can also cause supporter to destroy it because the viral growth slows.

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10 Keys To Memorable Brand Storytelling 

10 Keys To Memorable Brand Storytelling  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
When crafting your brand stories remember these ten keys for greatest impact.

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Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from A Change in Perspective
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Your Brain Has A “Shuffle” Button--Here’s How To Use It

Your Brain Has A “Shuffle” Button--Here’s How To Use It | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Having breakthrough ideas means priming your brain with lots of raw material for it to rummage through at random.

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Your Brain Has A “Shuffle” Button--Here’s How To Use It
 
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Grit: A Complete Guide on How to Be More Mentally Tough

Grit: A Complete Guide on How to Be More Mentally Tough | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
What is grit and how do you develop it? Here's how to prove to yourself that you have the guts to get in the ring and do battle with life.

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Don't try to change someone's mind, do this insteadDon't try to change someone's mind, do this instead

Don't try to change someone's mind, do this insteadDon't try to change someone's mind, do this instead | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
If you want to change someone’s mind about something, facts may not help you. So what do you do if changing minds or culture is important for your business?

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The Neuroscience of Trust

The Neuroscience of Trust | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Management behaviors that foster employee engagement

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MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry MintzbergMBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg

MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry MintzbergMBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Business schools have become enormously successful, in some respects deservedly so. They do a great deal of significant research (Harvard now especially so). In universities, they are centers of interdisciplinary work, bringing together psychologists, sociologists, economists, historians, mathematicians, and others. And their MBA programs do well in training for the business functions, such as finance and marketing, if not for management. So why do they persist in promoting this education for management, which, according to mounting evidence, produces so much mismanagement?

The answer is unfortunately obvious: with so many of their graduates getting to the “top”, why change? But there is another answer that is also becoming obvious: because at this top, too many of their graduates are corrupting the economy.7


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David Hain's curator insight, March 20, 6:41 AM

Henry Minzberg on a crusade against Business Schools and the Holy Grail of the MBA!

Steve Bax's curator insight, March 21, 6:47 AM
Fascinating. Makes for very concerning reading. 
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7 Mindset Shifts That Will Challenge HR Leaders

7 Mindset Shifts That Will Challenge HR Leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Human resource leaders in Asia need to make 7 critical mindset shifts in the coming decade if they are to adapt to a rapidly changing business environment, according to a new report from CCL and the Singapore Human Resources Institute.

Although based on insights from companies in Asia, many conclusions in CHRO 3.0: Preparing to Lead the Future HR Function in Asia will likely apply to HR leaders around the world. Many of the trends that Asian firms face — the rise of new types of enterprises, the growing role of technology, and a fast-changing competitive environment — are like faced by companies all over the world as well.


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David Hain's curator insight, March 22, 5:27 AM

A prescription for HR health the world over - be a doctor, not a helper! Plus other good advice... 

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Being Lazy Is the Key to Success, According to the Best-Selling Author of 'Moneyball'

Do you think of yourself as lazy? If so, do you think that's a good thing? It just might be the key to success. That's according to Michael Lewis, author of the bestsellers Moneyball, The Big Short, and many more.

Lewis was a keynote speaker at the 2017 Insight Summit put on by online survey company Qualtrics. In a candid interview with Qualtrics CEO Ryan Smith, Lewis explained why laziness never seemed like a bad thing in his mind, and how it's helped him succeed.

"I grew up in New Orleans, where no one did anything," he said. "It's an endlessly charming and delightful place, but the idea that your worth was connected to things you did in the world was an alien idea." In fact, Lewis recalled, his father had him convinced that there was a Lewis family crest with this motto: "Do as little as possible, and that unwillingly, because it is better to receive a slight reprimand than perform an arduous task." That turned out to be untrue, but the idea that leisure was to be cherished and that being constantly busy was not necessarily a good thing stuck with the younger Lewis.

Embracing laziness has helped him be successful because he focuses his efforts only where it really matters, he explained. Here's how that can create a real advantage:
You're OK with doing nothing.

When was the last time you felt comfortable doing nothing? Not for an hour or a day, but in general, with no immediate projects at hand? Lewis said he has no problem with inactivity if nothing worthwhile has captured his attention. If he believed that being industrious was important, he said, "I'd be panicked at the question 'What are you working on?' if I wasn't working on anything."

Have you ever taken on a project just so you wouldn't be inactive, just to keep things going? How many better opportunities have you missed because that project made you too busy to pursue them? Being willing to be inactive or less active means you'll be available when something truly worthy of your best effort comes along. It also means you'll have the time and space to go looking for those really worthwhile projects. If you're busy being busy, you'll miss them.

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Being Lazy Is the Key to Success, According to the Best-Selling Author of 'Moneyball'
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 24, 12:21 PM

A counter intuitive idea that may be attractive, but not necessarily beneficial in the "real world."  Lewis's book "Moneyball" is a good read with plenty of fascinating ideas offered for improving your life and business relationships.  Whether creative laziness is for you is something only you can work out.  Perhaps it would be better to find a job that offers challenges, rewards, and fulfillment rather than just waiting for something to come along.


Russell Roberts


Hawaii Intelligence Digest

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Five tips for becoming a better public storyteller

Five tips for becoming a better public storyteller | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The STAGE System is a method of speech craft I created that puts your personal stamp on every presentation you give. It’s an acronym for style, truth, art, group, and energy and it serves as a checklist for every speech you give, whether it’s your first or your 500th. The STAGE System gives you a chance to pause and ask yourself who you want to be on stage. If you are naturally funny, how can you incorporate some humor into your talk? If you went through a life-changing experience, how can you tie that into your subject? If you love interacting with the audience, how can you make that a big part of your speech? By using the STAGE System as your guide, you build your talk so you are in your element and really shining on stage.

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How to Calculate the Value of a Good Manager vs Bad Manager 

How to Calculate the Value of a Good Manager vs Bad Manager  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The value of a good manager vs bad manager can be hard to put a number to. We show you how to calculate the value of a good manager vs bad manager.

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New Study Finds Most Leaders Unprepared to Meet the Demands of Digital Disruption 

New Study Finds Most Leaders Unprepared to Meet the Demands of Digital Disruption  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
A new report, Redefining Leadership for a Digital Age, presents findings from a global survey of more than 1,000 executives across 20 different sectors.

In turbulent times, leaders are caught in a technology-change vortex that is drawing in whole industries and creating disruption on an unprecedented scale. An eye-watering 92% of leaders said they are feeling the effects of digital disruption, with one-third rating the impact of digital disruption on their companies as "very significant."

Despite the quickening pace of digital innovation, less than 15% of leaders said that they were "very prepared" to meet the demands of a digitally-disrupted business environment. The majority of participants (almost 80%) indicated that they were "starting preparations" or were "fairly prepared" to tackle digital disruption.

The research further reveals:

Less than 20% of respondents indicated that digital technologies such as analytics, mobile and social media are fully integrated into their organisations
30% of respondents either rarely or only occasionally use digital tools and technologies
In light of the clear understanding of the importance of digitisation, the report outlines the following "HAVE" competencies as the most important success criteria for leaders facing a landscape characterized by digital disruption:


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New Study Finds Most Leaders Unprepared to Meet the Demands of Digital Disruption
 
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David Hain's curator insight, March 7, 7:46 AM

We're getting disrupted like it or not - and most of us appear not to! Some tactics to get on board here...

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She's Being Called the Next Albert Einstein

She's Being Called the Next Albert Einstein | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
A 22-year-old Ph.D. candidate wants to understand the way quantum gravity works. And Jeff Bezos wants to hire her.
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She's Being Called the Next Albert Einstein
 
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The way we work doesn’t work, anymore – Work Futures

The way we work doesn’t work, anymore – Work Futures | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Gallup has released its 2017 State of the American Workplace, and the first words, from Jim Clifton, Gallup’s Chair and CEO, takes a very strong stand:
The very practice of management no longer works.
The old ways — annual reviews, forced rankings, outdated competencies — no longer achieve the intended results.
He goes on to make a list of recommendations that seem more of a grab bag than a well-focused manifesto, but I can’t disagree at all with the core insight: the way we work doesn’t work, anymore.

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The way we work doesn’t work, anymore – Work Futures
 
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David Hain's curator insight, March 3, 4:52 AM

Massive Gallup survey suggests our prevailing systems and values are fractured beyond repair. Thought-provoking read!

Ian Berry's curator insight, March 7, 1:22 AM
True. I personally declared control management dead in 1991. Glad the idea is becoming mainstream. Emphasis on meaningful work and career development also crucial
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Don’t Be Surprised When Your Employees Quit – Resources for Humans – Medium 

Don’t Be Surprised When Your Employees Quit – Resources for Humans – Medium  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
I recently wrote a post about the financial cost companies incur from losing talented employees. My hope was to illuminate in concrete terms just how expensive it is to lose good employees. In this…

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Motivation: The Scientific Guide on How to Get and Stay Motivated 

Motivation: The Scientific Guide on How to Get and Stay Motivated  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
This comprehensive guide covers the science of motivation and delivers useful motivation tips so you can learn how to motivate yourself and others.

Via Ariana Amorim, Bobby Dillard
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The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action 

The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Are you taking action or are you simply in motion? Read this article to discover the common mistake smart people make (and how to avoid it).

Via Ariana Amorim, Bobby Dillard
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The Mistake Smart People Make: Being In Motion vs. Taking Action
 
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