leadership 3.0
Follow
Find
11.3K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Business change
onto leadership 3.0
Scoop.it!

Every Leader Must Be A Change Agent Or Face Extinction

Every Leader Must Be A Change Agent Or Face Extinction | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
In a workplace infused with top down, hierarchical, departmental silos, change management is the new requirement for leadership success. With a market comprised of fickle consumers and workplaces brimming with employee identity crises, leadership success requires more patience, poise, and time-to-think – and the ability to seamlessly connect the dots of opportunity. The marketplace requirements to compete are evolving so quickly that leadership is struggling to stay ahead of the course; unsuccessful efforts to be proactive and sustain organizational readiness will come at an extremely high cost. As such, the demand for leadership that is willing and capable of tackling change management head-on – already in short supply – is at a premium. Leadership in the 21st century not only requires the ability to continuously manage crisis and change – but also the circular vision to see around, beneath and beyond the obvious in order to anticipate the unexpected before circumstances force your hand. As you embark upon your change management journey, here are ten things that will challenge your capabilities as a change agent and potentially become defining moments along your leadership success path.

Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, David Hain
more...
Lansana Gagny Sakho's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:47 PM

The marketplace requirements to compete are evolving so quickly that leadership is struggling to stay ahead of the course; unsuccessful efforts to be proactive and sustain organizational readiness will come at an extremely high cost.

Susan Taylor's curator insight, May 12, 2014 8:47 AM

The new requirement for leadership success?  Change Management.

Pamela Perry King's curator insight, May 27, 2014 1:34 PM

Does anyone have change for a "pair of dimes"?

leadership 3.0
The Leadership Resources Vault
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

Certificación Internacional en PNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c)

Certificación Internacional en PNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Certificación en PNL (Programación Neurolinguística) a nivel Internacional en los niveles Practitioner PNL, Master Practitioner PNL y Trainer PNL
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:

Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R), Online y Español. Visita --> http://uapnl.com

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Mindfull Decision Making
Scoop.it!

How Does Your Ego Impact Your Decision Making?

How Does Your Ego Impact Your Decision Making? | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Do you know of anyone who has suppressed bad news to preserve their career or reputation?Or told the boss what they wanted to hear instead of the truth?Or overlooked a red flag to preserve the sense of harmony in the workplace?Most often ego is catalogued as 'good' or 'bad', but what if it's simply about your relationship with yourself? At the heart of the matter your ego, your self-esteem, self-worth and personal sense of security, chaperons your decision-making. Does the business culture have an impact on your ego?It’s absurd to pretend that the business culture doesn’t have an

Via Philippe Vallat
more...
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 27, 3:48 AM

"...Transformational leaders have a habit of boldly going to those shadow sides, greet the skeletons, so you can get to know yourself from every angle and so you can strengthen your comfort with being in your skin..."

Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

Lo Obvio es lo Primero que se Olvida y Esto es Agua

Lo Obvio es lo Primero que se Olvida y Esto es Agua | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Lo Obvio es lo Primero que se Olvida y Esto es Agua - Reflexiones sobre Auto-Liderazgo Por José Luis Yañez [socialpoll id=2255041] Creo firmemente que
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

Leadership By Virtue: Does holacracy need leadership?

Leadership By Virtue: Does holacracy need leadership? | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The notion that holacracy is non-hierarchical proved as a nonsense.

Via David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, February 12, 7:46 AM

What;s your view about holacracy - fad, or revolutionary idea?  Or both?

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Futurable Planet: Answers from a Shifted Paradigm.
Scoop.it!

This is Water

This is "This is Water" by Patrick Buckley on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Via Anne Caspari
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:

Awesome! Must see!

more...
Anne Caspari's curator insight, February 20, 9:14 AM

nicely told story about the rat race and your ability to learn CHOOSING in order to get away from automated life; nice graphs too 

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Mindfull Decision Making
Scoop.it!

"A Powerful Lesson On Decision-Making In A Fast-Paced World"

"A Powerful Lesson On Decision-Making In A Fast-Paced World" | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

In this guest piece by David Marquet, Retired U.S. Navy Captain, David chronicles his experiences and mistakes while in command of the submarine the USS Santa Fe to reveal how you can empower your employees and colleagues to think for themselves.


Via Anne Leong, Philippe Vallat
more...
Philippe Vallat's curator insight, February 11, 11:53 AM

Quote:

"With intent-based leadership, you must take time to let others react to the situation as well.

You have to create a space for open decision by the entire team, even if that space is only a few minutes, or a few seconds, long. This is harder than in the leader-follower approach because it requires you to anticipate decisions and alert your team to the need for an upcoming one. In a top-down hierarchy, sub-ordinates don’t need to be thinking ahead because the boss will make a decision when needed."

Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

Necesitamos más Optimistas Insatisfechos

Necesitamos más Optimistas Insatisfechos | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
¿Quién cambia realmente el mundo? ¿Los optimistas? ¿Los pesimistas? El mundo lo cambian los Optimistas Insatisfechos
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
El mundo lo cambian los pesimistas

El otro día leí una frase que me hizo pensar. La frase decía algo así como: "Los pesimistas serán los que cambien el mundo, pues los optimistas están encantados con cómo está".

El mundo lo cambian los optimistas

Yo siempre he defendido más bien lo contrario, que los que cambian el mundo son los optimistas, pues los pesimistas tienden a creer que no es posible cambiarlo o que no merece la pena ni siquiera intentarlo...

El mundo lo cambian los optimistas insatisfechos

En realidad creo que se necesita un "optimismo insatisfecho" para iniciar e impulsar cambios.

Este "optimismo insatisfecho", que tiene más de un punto de encuentro con lo que llamamos "optimismo inteligente", supone una combinación de pesimismo y optimismo; combinación que varía en "porcentajes" de uno y otro y en momentos de aplicación de cada postura.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Leadership and Management
Scoop.it!

Want great employees? Set them free - Chicago Tribune

Want great employees? Set them free - Chicago Tribune | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Q. I have a new part-time hire whom I like and who is good at his job. The problem is he is acting burdened when I ask way in advance for him to work any overtime. He knew this was a condition of his job.

Via Rami Kantari
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Strategy and Leadership
Scoop.it!

How Successful People Overcome Toxic Bosses

How Successful People Overcome Toxic Bosses | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Bad bosses contaminate the workplace. Some do so obliviously, while others smugly manipulate their employees, using them as instruments of their own success. Regardless of their methods, bad bosses cause irrevocable damage to their companies and employees by hindering performance and creating unnecessary stress.The stress your boss causes is bad for your health. Multiple studies have found that working for a bad boss increases your chance of having a heart attack by as much as 50%.Even more troubling is the number of bad bosses out there. Gallup research found that 60% of government workers a

Via Chad Manske
more...
Chad Manske's curator insight, February 2, 11:35 PM

This piece typecasts the different kinds of 'bad' bosses out there and how to effectively deal with them in your work environment.

donhornsby's curator insight, February 4, 9:32 AM

(From the article): The Visionary


Her strength lies in her ideas and innovations. However, this entrepreneurial approach becomes dangerous when a plan or solution needs to be implemented, and she can’t bring herself to focus on the task at hand. When the time comes to execute her vision, she’s already off onto the next idea, and you’re left to figure things out on your own.

 

How to neutralize a visionary: To best deal with this type, reverse her train of thought. She naturally takes a broad perspective, so be quick to funnel things down into something smaller and more practical. To do so, ask a lot of specific questions that force her to rationally approach the issue and to consider potential obstacles to executing her broad ideas. Don’t refute her ideas directly, or she will feel criticized; instead, focus her attention on what it will take to realistically implement her plan. Oftentimes, your questions will diffuse her plan, and when they don’t, they’ll get her to understand—and commit to—the effort it’s going to take on her part to help make it happen.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Transformational Leadership
Scoop.it!

Why All Managers Must Be Leaders

Why All Managers Must Be Leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Anyone within an organization has the potential to become a leader, but managers must be leaders. In schools and in our organizations we have been taught and conditioned to believe that managers and leaders are two separate people which is quite a harmful assumption. As a result we have managers [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, January 29, 4:06 AM

Very much so... I would say, they are both, managers & leaders... they all need to organise, operate systems, processes + people... The proportion is of course varies wildly but those who have people reporting to them, must have both skills... Mintzberg (one of my most beloved "consultant"...) always said that...:-)))

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 29, 4:33 AM

on why being a manager should not be a dirty word and how every manager must also be a leader!

Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

A Radical, New Way to Interview Job Candidates

A Radical, New Way to Interview Job Candidates | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
What happens before an interview can be far more important than what happens during one.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

10 Tips for Leadership When You're Not the Boss

10 Tips for Leadership When You're Not the Boss | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
You don't have to wait until you're the boss to act like a leader.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Jazz of Innovation
Scoop.it!

Happiness and Your Company - Jules Peck

Happiness and Your Company - Jules Peck | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

A new vision of what it means to be prosperous and to flourish as individuals and societies is taking hold in parts of the business world. It's inspired by the coming together of disparate disciplines including positive psychology, welfare economics, hedonomics, neuroscience, and marketing.


Via Peter Verschuere
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Corporate Culture and OD
Scoop.it!

6 ways to instill a positive corporate culture

6 ways to instill a positive corporate culture | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

6 Ways to Instill a Positive Corporate Culture http://t.co/geJx1J0TKu via http://t.co/uDNqkUgujB #leadership #culture


Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, February 27, 6:49 AM

What are some of the ways an organization can cultivate a strong corporate culture?

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Five things Alice in Wonderland reveals about the brain

Five things Alice in Wonderland reveals about the brain | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Lewis Carroll’s popular tales contain some hidden truths about the human brain. David Robson takes a leap down the rabbit hole.

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, February 25, 10:11 AM

Love the neuroscientist insights of Alice in wonderland!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 25, 3:43 PM

There are links which will take some exploring in reading and reflecting upon this interesting article.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Miguel Herrera E.'s curator insight, February 26, 11:22 AM

5 revelaciones sobre el cerebro en "Alicia en el País de las Maravillas" de L. Carrol: Micropsias y macropsias, los múltiples cambios de forma,( metamorfosis), relaciones en el significado de las palabras,  memoria para anticipaciones ("recuerdos del futuro") y pensar en lo imposible. Los Boys scouts creo que afirman: "Imposible es aquello que se logra después"

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

Addressing unconscious bias | McKinsey & Company

Addressing unconscious bias | McKinsey & Company | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

Does lopsided male representation in media skew our perceptions? Geena Davis believes it does and that corporations have a critical role in driving change. 


Via Josie Gibson, David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, February 12, 7:18 AM

How androgynous is your workplace?

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Positive futures
Scoop.it!

16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn

16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

Our own brains regularly deceive us in order to make sense of the world we live in. Most of the time, it’s nothing more than an innocent effort to save face. Our brain will tell us we’re smarter and better looking than everyone else, and that any fault brought to our attention should probably be blamed on someone else. It will advocate for our convictions, pointing out any evidence that supports them and politely ignoring any that doesn’t. And it will even spare us from the mental strain of thinking beyond the stereotypes it has so conveniently crafted for us. The human brain is our best friend, and our worst enemy, and unless we keep one eye peeled, it can hijack our learning completely.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 12, 11:51 PM

In this article Saga Briggs examines some of the “traps” the brain sets for us during the course of our careers, and what we can do to avoid them. Psychologists have already done the hard work of realising there’s any hijacking going on at all; what’s left for us to do is pay attention. 



David Hain's curator insight, February 13, 12:21 PM

Understand your brain (and others) to develop real leverage in 21C jobs.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Complex systems and projects
Scoop.it!

How do we deal with complexity?

How do we deal with complexity? | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Is today any more volatile, uncertain, complex or ambiguous (VUCA) than previous ages? That's up for debate, but nobody denies that volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity are major chall...

Via F. Thunus, Philippe Vallat
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Futurewaves
Scoop.it!

The Acceleration of Acceleration: How The Future Is Arriving Far Faster Than Expected

The Acceleration of Acceleration: How The Future Is Arriving Far Faster Than Expected | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
One of the things that happens when you write books about the future is you get to watch your predictions fail. This is nothing new, of course, but what’s different this time around is the direction of those failures.

Via Trudy Raymakers
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Leadership and Management
Scoop.it!

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance - HBR

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance - HBR | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Ways to move from frustrated to energized.

Via Rami Kantari
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

The Dawn of System Leadership

The Dawn of System Leadership | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

The deep changes necessary to accelerate progress against society's most intractable problems require a unique type of leader - the system leader, a person who catalyzes collective leadership.


At no time in history have we needed such system leaders more. We face a host of systemic challenges beyond the reach of existing institutions and their hierarchical authority structures. Problems like climate change, destruction of ecosystems, growing scarcity of water, youth unemployment, and embedded poverty and inequity require unprecedented collaboration among different organizations, sectors, and even countries. Sensing this need, countless collaborative initiatives have arisen in the past decade - locally, regionally, and even globally. Yet more often than not they have floundered - in part because they failed to foster collective leadership within and across the collaborating organizations.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, January 23, 9:12 PM

There's a lot to like in this article and much to contemplate. I particularly like the 3 core capabilities of see the large system, further reflection and more generative conversations, and shifting from reactive problem-solving to co-creating the future.

Jason Leong's curator insight, January 25, 7:13 PM

"System leaders like Baldwin and Winslow understand that collective wisdom cannot be manufactured or built into a plan created in advance. And it is not likely to come from leaders who seek to “drive” their predetermined change agenda. Instead, system leaders work to create the space where people living with the problem can come together to tell the truth, think more deeply about what is really happening, explore options beyond popular thinking, and search for higher leverage changes through progressive cycles of action and reflection and learning over time. Knowing that there are no easy answers to truly complex problems, system leaders cultivate the conditions wherein collective wisdom emerges over time through a ripening process that gradually brings about new ways of thinking, acting, and being.


For those new to system leadership, creating space can seem passive or even weak. For them, strong leadership is all about executing a plan. Plans are, of course, always needed, but without openness people can miss what is emerging, like a sailor so committed to his initial course that he won’t adjust to shifts in the wind. Even more to the point, the conscious acts of creating space, of engaging people in genuine questions, and of convening around a clear intention with no hidden agenda, creates a very different type of energy from that which arises from seeking to get people committed to your plan."

Debbie Diaz-Arnold's curator insight, January 28, 4:41 AM

Becoming a systems leader: capacity building at its best.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Strategy and Leadership
Scoop.it!

Be Seen as a Leader

Be Seen as a Leader | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
A simple exercise can boost your status and influence.

Via Chad Manske
more...
Prof. Hankell's curator insight, February 3, 9:42 AM

Numerous studies show that social hierarchies develop quickly and are generally stable: People who achieve high status early tend to retain it...

Kimberley Richardson's curator insight, February 4, 8:41 AM

It's how others see you, that makes you a leader!

Eugene Fernandez's curator insight, February 7, 5:18 AM

Outlines three approaches, promotion focus, happiness and a feeling of power that help in shifting how you interact with others and thereby influence their perception of your personal power.

Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

5 Things You Must Do to Retain Millennial Workers

5 Things You Must Do to Retain Millennial Workers | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
There's a new generation hitting the workplace, and it'll take a new type of office culture to get them to stick around.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

3 Things Great Leaders Do With Their Anger

3 Things Great Leaders Do With Their Anger | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Why great leaders don't blame people, circumstances, or conditions for their anger.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

5 Non-Evil Ways To Get People To Do What You Want, From Dan Pink

5 Non-Evil Ways To Get People To Do What You Want, From Dan Pink | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Science has some answers about how to deal with difficult people. Here NYT bestselling author Dan Pink breaks down how to make people behave better.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Radical Compassion
Scoop.it!

This is a better predictor of your success than IQ or EQ

This is a better predictor of your success than IQ or EQ | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

An unsettling classroom experience near the start of his second year in the Stanford Graduate School of Business MBA Program caused a personal crisis for Shirzad Chamine and led him to the work he’s doing more than a quarter century later. The 1987 class was Interpersonal Dynamics, nicknamed “Touchy-Feely” for the way it has highly analytical students explore the softer side of business. One day, students took turns telling their classmates how each was coming across, and one after another, they told Chamine that he gave the impression of constantly and secretly judging them—even a classmate whom Chamine greatly admired. Chamine’s genial façade wasn’t fooling anyone.

 

 

Devastated by this feedback, he panicked that he had no clue how to change. Within two weeks, though, Chamine, who had grown up in a turbulent, emotionally abusive home in Iran, had a helpful insight.

 

Noticing judgmental behaviors that he thought others might be using as well in an effort to disguise insecurities, he poured out his thoughts into a five-page typed letter to first-year students. The letter touched its audience, especially the many students stressed or saddened by academic and social pressure—so much so that 26 years later, it is still in circulation among students. After receiving “tons of thank-you letters,” the 1988 graduate knew he was on to something. “That’s when I felt reassured that ‘the judge’ tends to be universal,” even if not in the extreme form he saw in himself.

 

 

After more reading and soul-searching, Chamine came to think of this judge as what he calls a “Saboteur,” one of several figurative villains that he says can reside in normal human minds. “Your mind is your best friend, but it is also your very worst enemy,” he says, calling the best-friend part your “Sage,” the voice of authenticity, calm and positive emotion. The Saboteurs—which, besides the Judge, include such instantly recognizable types as the Victim, the Avoider, the Hyper-Achiever and six others—undermine you by triggering anger, anxiety, shame, regret and other negative emotions. “Pretty much all your suffering in life is self-generated by your Saboteurs,” Chamine says.

 

 

The good news, which evangelist Chamine has been sharing through lectures, a popular book Positive Intelligence, and executive coaching, is that you can choose at any moment which voice to listen to. “That choice makes all the difference in not only how happy you are, but whether you reach your true potential,” says Chamine, who for many years ran the Coaches Training Institute, a San Rafael, Calif.-based company that trains executive coaches and life coaches.

 

 

Backed by data

 

Research in positive psychology, neuroscience and even organization science supports many of Chamine’s claims. Psychologists have long observed a human tendency to attend disproportionately to the negatives, since our ancestors’ survival was aided when they noticed threats. Brain-imaging studies have shown the seats of various emotions, suggesting that creating a positive mental state requires activating one area and quieting another. Experiments on happiness interventions have shown ways to foster optimism, compassion and other good feelings. And studies by organizational scholars have shown that happier people and teams make for more productive workers.

 

 

The finding that links happiness with productivity owes much to the work of Stanford University alumna Barbara Fredrickson, who received her PhD in psychology in 1990. Now a professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, she is best-known for her “broaden and build” theory of positive emotions. The theory explains why, given that natural selection favored negativity, evolution would have left us with positive emotions at all: Whereas negative emotions narrow our focus to handle an urgent challenge, Fredrickson argues, positive emotions broaden our options, enabling us to play, to explore, to think more creatively, and to build human connections. If negativity aids survival, positivity makes it possible to thrive. As a result, people with higher ratios of positive to negative emotions are more likely to flourish in life, experiencing better health, more satisfying relationships and greater professional achievement.

 

 

Chamine uses a similar metric he calls the positivity quotient, or the fraction of all your emotional experiences that are positive. PQ, he says, is more important for your success than your IQ or your EQ (emotional intelligence). Many of the executives he coaches, he says, have tried to raise their EQ, with little lasting success. EQ training teaches self-awareness and self-management, among other skills, but it misses a crucial component, Chamine believes. “What EQ training doesn’t tackle are the Saboteurs, who, left untouched, quickly reclaim their power.”

 

 

Helping people raise their PQ

 

Chamine’s goal is practical: He wants to help everyone, from children to executives, raise their PQ. Through his coaching practice, he’s refined techniques designed to weaken the Saboteurs (for starters, by learning to spot them in action) and strengthen the Sage, starting with understanding that an optimistic attitude becomes self-fulfilling. For example, he recommends a thought experiment involving identical twins who face a setback in opposite ways: One blames himself or others, while the second one says, “I can turn this failure into an opportunity.” Guess which twin will be better able to muster the internal resources, such as compassion and curiosity, to overcome the setback? “When your Judge says you’re screwed, you are screwed,” Chamine says.

 

 

Many of the exercises Chamine uses, like the twin experiment, are almost like little games. Others, like the mindfulness exercise that has you focus on a bodily sensation for 10 seconds, sound less fun, and, in fact, Chamine prescribes a number of “reps,” as if you were counting crunches at the gym. Fun or not, you have to stick with the program. The effort, though, can bear unexpected fruit.

 

 

“One of the biggest lies is that success leads to happiness,” Chamine says, rather than the other way around. “The biggest insight is that the happy brain is a more capable, more creative, more resourceful brain.”


Via Jim Manske
more...
No comment yet.