leadership 3.0
14.1K views | +2 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from strategic learning
onto leadership 3.0
Scoop.it!

Elearning design: Making training fun

Elearning design: Making training fun | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Do haunted castles and talking frogs really make learning "fun?" Research shows that developing mastery is what's really fun.

Via Sue Hickton
more...
No comment yet.
leadership 3.0
The Leadership Resources Vault
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jose Luis Yañez
Scoop.it!

Invitación Vídeo Tour Campus UAPNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c)

Invitación Vídeo Tour Campus UAPNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Vídeo-Tour 100% GRATIS por CAMPUS UAPNL  Acompáñame DENTRO del CAMPUS y comprueba la CALIDAD de nuestros PROGRAMAS  Obtén tu CERTIFICACIÓN en PNL, fácil y
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:

Vídeo Tour 100% GRATUITO por el CAMPUS UAPNL. Acompáñame DENTRO del CAMPUS y comprueba la CALIDAD de nuestros PROGRAMAS: http://www.uapnl.com/invitacion-video-tour-campus-uapnl/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard

The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
It's not about being right. It's about this instead, all right?

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Good News For A Change
Scoop.it!

Once You Understand Emotion, Motivation is Easy

Once You Understand Emotion, Motivation is Easy | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
One of the most powerful theories on how to motivate people on the work-floor is Deci and Ryan's Self-Determination Theory.

Via Kevin Watson, Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Once You Understand Emotion, Motivation is Easy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

"Economics Nobel Prize" Winners Are Advocating For Universal Basic Income

"Economics Nobel Prize" Winners Are Advocating For Universal Basic Income | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Up until very recently, most people had not heard of universal basic income (UBI). While the idea itself isn't entirely new, its significance has been explored lately because of job displacement fears intelligent automation is expected to bring with it.

As such, UBI has been endorsed by experts from various industries, including some of the Silicon Valley's bigwigs. Now, some of the world's top economists are backing it up, too.

Speaking at a panel discussion at the 6th Lindau meeting on economic sciences back in June, winners of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel - more commonly known as the "economics Nobel prize" - endorsed UBI as a solution to the inequality brought by globalisation and automation.

"We should not try to deal with inequality by stopping these global processes, because these have the capacity to bring more prosperity to the world," Sir Chris Pissarides said.

"We should welcome expansion of trade and the opening up of India and Africa, and improve R&D to bring robotics into production. After all, if there aren't enough jobs for us all to do, we can take more leisure."

"We are ageing, so we can feel comfortable that machines will do more of the work that human beings currently do."

Simply put, a UBI program allows people to receive a fixed income regardless of circumstances - employment, social status, etc.

Aside from potentially helping people cope with automation, those who favour UBI also see it as an alternative to today's social welfare programs. Others who are skeptical of it often point out how it could make people lazy and reluctant to find proper employment.

Via Wildcat2030
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
"Economics Nobel Prize" Winners Are Advocating For Universal Basic Income
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from #I Want Self Improvement!
Scoop.it!

The Story of Your Life

The Story of Your Life | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
How you arrange the plot points of your life into a narrative can shape who you are—and is a fundamental part of being human.

Via Ariana Amorim, Karlton B McIver
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
The Story of Your Life
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

Leadership is Common Sense in Action

Leadership is Common Sense in Action | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Effective leadership is common sense, yet in many workplaces the right behaviors remain elusive. It's time for all of us to develop a bit of self discipline

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Leadership is Common Sense in Action
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in Empathic Design, Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
Scoop.it!

Thinking About Design Thinking: Is It Important? 

Thinking About Design Thinking: Is It Important?  | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Design thinking is the biggest buzzword in the design world since flat design. Everyone is talking about it… even non-designers. So what is design thinking? Is it important? Should you care?

Here’s the good news: design thinking is something that’s probably part of what you “just do” even if you didn’t have a name for it. Design thinking is another way to think about problem-solving. Let’s take a closer look, and delve into what it means, and why it can be useful!

Design Thinking = Problem Solving

Via Edwin Rutsch
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Thinking About Design Thinking: Is It Important?
more...
Fiona Leigh's curator insight, August 25, 11:34 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

Five Simple Tips For Building A More Emotionally Intelligent Team

Five Simple Tips For Building A More Emotionally Intelligent Team | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

Getting smart people into your company is hard enough. Turning them all into great collaborators and risk-takers is even harder. Even on the most high-performing teams, coworkers don’t just openly share feedback and challenge each others’ ideas all on their own–managers need to create a culture that encourages this. And that usually requires building your team’s collective emotional intelligence. Here are a few straightforward (and entirely low-tech ways) to get started.


Via The Learning Factor, Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Five Simple Tips For Building A More Emotionally Intelligent Team
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 29, 9:17 PM

There’s no single hack for improving your team’s collective emotional intelligence. As a manager, it’s the small habits you perform and encourage that ripple outward.

Susanna Lavialle's curator insight, September 6, 6:19 PM
Very good points...I am hoping to become a better manager in the future - and trying to inspire my team members to do their best every day
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Good News For A Change
Scoop.it!

Don't try to change someone's mind, do this insteadDon't try to change someone's mind, do this instead

Don't try to change someone's mind, do this insteadDon't try to change someone's mind, do this instead | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
If you want to change someone’s mind about something, facts may not help you. So what do you do if changing minds or culture is important for your business?

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Don't try to change someone's mind, do this instead
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Success Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience of Trust

The Neuroscience of Trust | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Management behaviors that foster employee engagement

Via Richard Andrews
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
The Neuroscience of Trust
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry MintzbergMBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg

MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry MintzbergMBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Business schools have become enormously successful, in some respects deservedly so. They do a great deal of significant research (Harvard now especially so). In universities, they are centers of interdisciplinary work, bringing together psychologists, sociologists, economists, historians, mathematicians, and others. And their MBA programs do well in training for the business functions, such as finance and marketing, if not for management. So why do they persist in promoting this education for management, which, according to mounting evidence, produces so much mismanagement?

The answer is unfortunately obvious: with so many of their graduates getting to the “top”, why change? But there is another answer that is also becoming obvious: because at this top, too many of their graduates are corrupting the economy.7


Via David Hain
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
MBAs as CEOs: Some troubling evidence | Henry Mintzberg
more...
David Hain's curator insight, March 20, 6:41 AM

Henry Minzberg on a crusade against Business Schools and the Holy Grail of the MBA!

Steve Bax's curator insight, March 21, 6:47 AM
Fascinating. Makes for very concerning reading. 
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

7 Mindset Shifts That Will Challenge HR Leaders

7 Mindset Shifts That Will Challenge HR Leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Human resource leaders in Asia need to make 7 critical mindset shifts in the coming decade if they are to adapt to a rapidly changing business environment, according to a new report from CCL and the Singapore Human Resources Institute.

Although based on insights from companies in Asia, many conclusions in CHRO 3.0: Preparing to Lead the Future HR Function in Asia will likely apply to HR leaders around the world. Many of the trends that Asian firms face — the rise of new types of enterprises, the growing role of technology, and a fast-changing competitive environment — are like faced by companies all over the world as well.


Via David Hain
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
7 Mindset Shifts That Will Challenge HR Leaders
more...
David Hain's curator insight, March 22, 5:27 AM

A prescription for HR health the world over - be a doctor, not a helper! Plus other good advice... 

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Being Lazy Is the Key to Success, According to the Best-Selling Author of 'Moneyball'

Do you think of yourself as lazy? If so, do you think that's a good thing? It just might be the key to success. That's according to Michael Lewis, author of the bestsellers Moneyball, The Big Short, and many more.

Lewis was a keynote speaker at the 2017 Insight Summit put on by online survey company Qualtrics. In a candid interview with Qualtrics CEO Ryan Smith, Lewis explained why laziness never seemed like a bad thing in his mind, and how it's helped him succeed.

"I grew up in New Orleans, where no one did anything," he said. "It's an endlessly charming and delightful place, but the idea that your worth was connected to things you did in the world was an alien idea." In fact, Lewis recalled, his father had him convinced that there was a Lewis family crest with this motto: "Do as little as possible, and that unwillingly, because it is better to receive a slight reprimand than perform an arduous task." That turned out to be untrue, but the idea that leisure was to be cherished and that being constantly busy was not necessarily a good thing stuck with the younger Lewis.

Embracing laziness has helped him be successful because he focuses his efforts only where it really matters, he explained. Here's how that can create a real advantage:
You're OK with doing nothing.

When was the last time you felt comfortable doing nothing? Not for an hour or a day, but in general, with no immediate projects at hand? Lewis said he has no problem with inactivity if nothing worthwhile has captured his attention. If he believed that being industrious was important, he said, "I'd be panicked at the question 'What are you working on?' if I wasn't working on anything."

Have you ever taken on a project just so you wouldn't be inactive, just to keep things going? How many better opportunities have you missed because that project made you too busy to pursue them? Being willing to be inactive or less active means you'll be available when something truly worthy of your best effort comes along. It also means you'll have the time and space to go looking for those really worthwhile projects. If you're busy being busy, you'll miss them.

Via Wildcat2030
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Being Lazy Is the Key to Success, According to the Best-Selling Author of 'Moneyball'
more...
prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 24, 12:21 PM

A counter intuitive idea that may be attractive, but not necessarily beneficial in the "real world."  Lewis's book "Moneyball" is a good read with plenty of fascinating ideas offered for improving your life and business relationships.  Whether creative laziness is for you is something only you can work out.  Perhaps it would be better to find a job that offers challenges, rewards, and fulfillment rather than just waiting for something to come along.


Russell Roberts


Hawaii Intelligence Digest

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Good News For A Change
Scoop.it!

Willpower Doesn’t Work. Here’s How to Actually Change Your Life.

Willpower Doesn’t Work. Here’s How to Actually Change Your Life. | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Whether you want to get healthier, stop using social media so much, improve your relationships, be happier, write a book, or start a business — willpower won’t help you with any of these things…

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Willpower Doesn’t Work. Here’s How to Actually Change Your Life.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive FactsTurns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts

Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive FactsTurns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
We all like to think that we're rational creatures able to make objective decisions, but our biases may be a lot stronger than we think.

New research has found that humans have an excellent ability to ignore facts that don't fit with our own biases, not just on Facebook where the stakes are pretty low, but even when it can cost us money.

Stefano Palminteri of École Normale Supérieure led a team of researchers from ENS and University College London, which previously reported that humans are biased towards the path of least resistance, even though that can make us depressed later on.

In those situations, people don't seem to be able to perceive intangible future repercussions.

Palminteri's team sought to discover in an experimental environment whether our biases are so strong that we continue to hold onto them even when something tangible is on the line in that moment.

The study involved 20 volunteers performing two variants of a task: choosing between pairs of symbols, each of which had been assigned a points value.

For the first variant of the task, the participants were only told the value of the symbols they chose. Over time, they learned that some symbols were more valuable and developed a bias towards choosing those symbols.

For the second variant, the participants were told the values of both symbols, even though they could only pick one. However, they continued to choose the symbols they had learned to be biased towards in the first part of the experiment, even when they had proof that the other symbol was worth more.

This could be why some people won't change their minds, even when the evidence is staring them in the face.

"It's as if you don't hear the voices in your head telling you that you're wrong, even if you lose money," Paliminteri told New Scientist.

Via Wildcat2030
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Turns Out Our Biases Really Are Stronger Than Our Ability to Perceive Facts
more...
English's curator insight, September 7, 1:11 AM
Share your insight
Dr Huey Allen's curator insight, September 8, 9:22 AM

Yes, personal biases do affect leadership decisions!

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from #I Want Self Improvement!
Scoop.it!

This Psychological Study Reveals How We Can 'Turn Back Time' and Reinvent Ourselves

This Psychological Study Reveals How We Can 'Turn Back Time' and Reinvent Ourselves | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
We are all actors on a stage, but we get to choose our roles.

Via Skip Boykin, Karlton B McIver
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
This Psychological Study Reveals How We Can 'Turn Back Time' and Reinvent Ourselves
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

These are the skills you should learn that will pay off forever

These are the skills you should learn that will pay off forever | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The further along you are in your career, the easier it is to fall back on the mistaken assumption that you’ve made it and have all the skills you need to succeed. The tendency is to focus all your energy on getting the job done, assuming that the rest will take care of itself. Big mistake.

New research from Stanford tells the story. Carol Dweck and her colleagues conducted a study with people who were struggling with their performance. One group was taught to perform better on a task that they performed poorly in. The other group received a completely different intervention: for the task that they performed badly in, they were taught that they weren’t stuck and that improving their performance was a choice. They discovered that learning produces physiological changes in the brain, just like exercise changes muscles. All they had to do was believe in themselves and make it happen.

When the groups’ performance was reassessed a few months later, the group that was taught to perform the task better did even worse. The group that was taught that they had the power to change their brains and improve their performance themselves improved dramatically.

The primary takeaway from Dweck’s research is that we should never stop learning. The moment we think that we are who we are is the moment we give away our unrealized potential.

Via Wildcat2030
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
These are the skills you should learn that will pay off forever
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from A Change in Perspective
Scoop.it!

7 Essential Books on the Art and Science of Happiness

7 Essential Books on the Art and Science of Happiness | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
From cognitive science to sociology to behavioral economics, 7 must-reads that illuminate the most fundamental aspiration of all human existence: How to avoid

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
7 Essential Books on the Art and Science of Happiness
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

The Good, Hard Work of Developing Managers Who Lead

The Good, Hard Work of Developing Managers Who Lead | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
We often falsely assume the work of front-line managers is less about leading and more about results. In reality, we must develop these managers as leaders.

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
The Good, Hard Work of Developing Managers Who Lead
more...
Jerry Busone's curator insight, August 29, 7:42 AM

Love the question 

At the end of our time working together, what will you say that I did?”

I like to ask  "Did I help you get better" ... Good read 

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from #I Want Self Improvement!
Scoop.it!

How Your Self Talk Affects You Good And Bad!

How Your Self Talk Affects You Good And Bad! | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
"Happiness is a left brain function. It is directly tied to what you say to yourself on the inside. Speech is left brain, too. We're as happy as our self talk is happy and positive. We're as happy as our thoughts and pictures. We're as happy as the story we routinely tell ourselves. We think…

Via Karlton B McIver
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
How Your Self Talk Affects You Good And Bad!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Education and Training
Scoop.it!

The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer

The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

In a couple of my recent posts I’ve talked about managers using coach-like skills in their conversations with direct reports. Doing this often makes conversations more impactful and effective.

But there are times when using a coaching style is not appropriate—when, in fact, it can be counterproductive and cause the other person to become frustrated.


Via Roger Francis, Kevin Watson, Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
The Leader as Coach: 3 Times When Coaching Is Not the Answer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in Empathic Design, Human-Centered Design & Design Thinking
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking: Select the Right Team Members and Start Facilitating

Design Thinking: Select the Right Team Members and Start Facilitating | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Some of the aims of Design Thinking's approach are to create:

greater inclusivenessbetter team cohesionhigher levels of collaboration and interactionincreased creative confidenceEveryone thinks, feels, and experiences things differently. Differences are what we need. Knowing that certain activities are not natural for everyone means that some preparation, explanation, and trust-building, before the launch, can go a long way towards preventing people from jumping ship.
Some of the obstacles the process aims to overcome:

Fear of failureIntimidationLow self esteemHierarchyCreative blocksBlind spotsSpecialisation bias

Via Edwin Rutsch
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Design Thinking: Select the Right Team Members and Start Facilitating
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Empathy in the Workplace
Scoop.it!

(Empathic Leadership) Why the Empathetic Leader Is the Best Leader

(Empathic Leadership) Why the Empathetic Leader Is the Best Leader | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
It’s All About Empathy
Sinek says researching his latest book has even changed the way he conducts his own life and business. “The lesson I’m learning is that I’m useless by myself. My success hinges entirely on the people I work with—the people who enlist themselves to join me in my vision. And it’s my responsibility to see that they’re working at their best capacity.”

Empathy—the ability to recognize and share other people’s feelings—is the most important instrument in a leader’s toolbox, Sinek believes. It can be expressed in the simple words, “Is everything OK?”

It’s what effective leaders ask an employee, instead of commanding “Clean out your desk” when he or she starts slacking off. It’s what you ask a client when a once-harmonious relationship gets rocky. “I really believe in quiet confrontation,” Sinek says. “If you had a good working relationship with someone and it’s suddenly gone sour, I believe in saying something like, ‘When we started we were both so excited, and it’s become really difficult now. Are you OK? What’s changed?’

 

Shelley Levitt

Via Edwin Rutsch
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
(Empathic Leadership) Why the Empathetic Leader Is the Best Leader
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders

A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
The prevailing logic is that leaders are responsible for results. Therefore we should evaluate leaders as follows:

Good results = good leader
Average results = average leader
Bad results = bad leader
Simple and straightforward.

But not very accurate.

Good leaders will sometimes fail.

Bad leaders do sometimes succeed.

So why does this belief persist?

Via David Hain
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
A Balanced Scorecard for Leaders
more...
David Hain's curator insight, March 21, 6:16 AM

"One-dimensional focus produces one-dimensional leaders" ~ Scott Mabry, aka @soul2work

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 21, 2:24 PM

Balanced scorecards can be good if they are flexible enough to handle business today.  Most are not.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs

How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
CCL’s study of leadership development program alumni found the degree of support from participants’ bosses for their development activities made a significant impact on several outcomes. Selfawareness, leadership capability, leadership effectiveness, and engagement were
all significantly improved when participants had the support of their bosses.

For organizations investing in the development of their people—whether individual contributors or c-suite executives—this research means that participant engagement with a leadership development program is not the only factor influencing outcomes. Maximizing the value of leadership development initiatives requires organizations and their training and development partners to constructively engage bosses as well as participants.

This has important implications for individual leadership development program design as well as broader organizational and leadership development efforts. Companies are increasingly requiring a clear return on investment from leadership development programs and looking for ways to ensure such initiatives have a sustained impact. Engaging bosses is a key ingredient in that effort.

Via David Hain
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs
more...
David Hain's curator insight, March 22, 5:38 AM

Don't just spend leadership development money on those hi-potentials. Brief,debrief and coach them! Your follow-up is crucial!

donhornsby's curator insight, March 22, 8:18 AM
The study suggests that when it comes to boss support, a little goes a long way.
 
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 23, 11:21 AM

Title says it all because it is true.

Rescooped by Jose Luis Yañez from Good News For A Change
Scoop.it!

Taking Feedback Impersonally – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium

Taking Feedback Impersonally – The Year of the Looking Glass – Medium | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
This was first published on my mailing list The Looking Glass. Every week, I answer a reader’s question. I recently had a situation where my team was re-doing something I had worked on for a couple…

Via Bobby Dillard
Jose Luis Yañez's insight:
Taking Feedback Impersonally – The Year of the Looking Glass
more...
No comment yet.