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Shortcuts to Peace and Happiness | The Psychology of Wellbeing

Shortcuts to Peace and Happiness | The Psychology of Wellbeing | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Ashley Davis Bush, author of Shortcuts to Inner Peace shares a few of her tricks for training our brains to respond with compassion, optimism and kindness.
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Certificación Internacional en PNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c)

Certificación Internacional en PNL - Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R) & +Lead-Map (c) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Certificación en PNL (Programación Neurolinguística) a nivel Internacional en los niveles Practitioner PNL, Master Practitioner PNL y Trainer PNL
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Certificación Internacional en PNL por la AUNLP (R), Online y Español. Visita --> http://uapnl.com

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A Radical, New Way to Interview Job Candidates

A Radical, New Way to Interview Job Candidates | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
What happens before an interview can be far more important than what happens during one.
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10 Tips for Leadership When You're Not the Boss

10 Tips for Leadership When You're Not the Boss | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
You don't have to wait until you're the boss to act like a leader.
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Happiness and Your Company - Jules Peck

Happiness and Your Company - Jules Peck | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

A new vision of what it means to be prosperous and to flourish as individuals and societies is taking hold in parts of the business world. It's inspired by the coming together of disparate disciplines including positive psychology, welfare economics, hedonomics, neuroscience, and marketing.


Via Peter Verschuere
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How Values Expedite Connection and Integration

How Values Expedite Connection and Integration | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
We’re integrating a new team member. I asked her about values. Her first words were about excellence. Values as points of integration and connection: She’ll interact with team members with their ow...
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Why the Workplace Needs Positive Psychology

Why the Workplace Needs Positive Psychology | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
For a company to succeed, employees need to be creative, proactive, and driven to do good work. Employees need to be effective in their collaborations, efficient in their production, and feel valuable to the company as contributors to its bottom line. Odds are, many who read that description wish it were true for their companies. There are ways based on research in positive psychology for companies to get there. Here are some of the focus areas to consider:

 

Group Success

Good work: Doing high-quality, socially responsible, and meaningful work.

 

Personnel selection: Choosing the right people.

Enabling engagement: Promoting optimal experiences, self-efficacy, and job-person fit.

 

Mentoring: Growing your own talent.

Team performance: Fostering teamwork, rather than an association of individuals.

 

Creativity and innovation: Finding ways to produce more creative works.


With increasing demands in the workplace and a greater need for knowledge-based work, innovation, and creativity, organizations need to find ways to enable their employees to do and be their best. Because of positive psychology’s focus on flourishing, and its transform-good-into-great angle, it is relevant to any conversation on the factors that contribute to solid organizational performance, and will become an essential contributor to success in the business world. Positive psychology can show those in management roles how to use and develop human capital. It can also guide organizational policy and enable workers to make their best contributions. Positive psychology has been, and will continue to be, a boon to the workplace.


Via Jay Cross
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Ergo's curator insight, December 29, 2014 7:40 AM

Orin Davis, docteur en Psychologie positive présente le cas d'un centre d'appel dans lequel, le manager à décidé de laisser les employés travailler de la façon qu'ils souhaitent menant ainsi à un fort épanouissement professionnel.
L'auteur choisit de mettre l'accent sur ce style de leadership épanouissant dans lequel les employés sont encouragés à partager leurs astuces entre eux et à développer leurs compétences.

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John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative

John Cleese on the 5 Factors to Make Your Life More Creative | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
"Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating."

Much has been said about how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, and what

Via Creativity For Life, Rami Kantari
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 3:11 PM

The reason why most of Africa and southern Asia has a low Human Development Index is because Africa and southern Asia has a high homelessness rate in comparison to other places and also, their economy is not as strong as Russia's, United States' or Europe's. It is cliché that Africa is mostly known for it's natural environments. Also, the Urban population in Africa is not as much as the Urban population in North America, South America, Europe, Russia and Australia.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, Today, 10:23 AM

A bit old, but still useful info...

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How Positive Psychology is Transforming the Way we Think about Leadership

How Positive Psychology is Transforming the Way we Think about Leadership | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

One of the activities I often do with students when introducing the idea of positive psychology in leadership is to ask them to select their favourite leadership quotation and explain it in terms of psychology theory and evidence.

Being positive psychologists, popular choices include:

 

A leader is a dealer in hope (attrib. Napoleon Bonaparte) – optimism, hope, inspiration, the broaden & build theory It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself (proverb) – emotional intelligence, strengths, self-regulation Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm (attrib. Publilius Syrus) – resilience, strengths/unrealised strengths, self-efficacy
Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Adrian Bertolini's comment, May 9, 2013 5:42 PM
Nice Scoop Sacha!
Jillian Pellicano's curator insight, November 5, 2014 5:17 PM

It has become evident that positive psychology leadership strategies achieve exceptional performance. There are a number of reasons why managers should strive to become positive leaders.

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 24, 4:46 AM

It is and will continue to transform this space!

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Employee Engagement Depends on What Happens Outside of the Office

Employee Engagement Depends on What Happens Outside of the Office | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
So stop only considering 9-5.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 14, 8:18 AM

What happens beyond office is as important to engagement.

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FOUR INVISIBLE FORCES DRIVING YOUR THINKING

FOUR INVISIBLE FORCES DRIVING YOUR THINKING | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

The invisible social fields in which we live and work are critical for our companies, our teams, and our families. One of the greatest challenges leaders have to face today is to understand the connection between the invisible social fields sustained by all team members and failure and to then make the necessary improvements to these fields to ensure reduced risk and high performance. Most leaders pay attention to the individual skills when in reality, the invisible social fields created by all individuals drive danger and risk. Social context trumps reason and social context drives your behaviors with an influence akin to an invisible force. We naturally adapt our behaviors to the context and in high-risk industries this makes the difference between life and death. 


Via Claude Emond, David Hain
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Claude Emond's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:28 AM

This says it all ! 

Claude Emond's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:29 AM

This says it all !

David Hain's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:19 AM

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble,is what you know for sure that just ain't so - probably Mark Twain

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Who Needs Rebels at Work?

Who Needs Rebels at Work? | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
By Carmen Medina "I promise to read the book and make sure to keep it from all the people in my group. Last thing I need are rebels." The above is a genuine reaction we received from a longstanding friend about our new book "Rebels at Work: A Handbook for Leading Change [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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donhornsby's curator insight, January 14, 2:51 PM

Rehabilitating your Troublemakers. Corporate leaders may worry that Rebels at Work will create gangs of rebellious employees (cue Les Miserables). But the reality is rebels are already inside your corporate gates and increasingly unhappy. Many of them have the potential to become positive forces for your organization — to become good rebels. For that to happen, however, employees need different skills and managers need more effective ways of managing individuals who think differently.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 14, 8:08 PM

But rebelling is not just about rebelling. It is about changing the way things are done and the paradigm within which it is done. Retaining neo-colonial and patriarchal ways does not change anything.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Joe Boutte's curator insight, January 16, 8:12 AM

Rebels who still understand the vision of the organization and find new ways to stir the pot and innovative approaches to achieving the objectives are needed in every organization.

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Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company

Decoding leadership: What really matters | McKinsey & Company | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
New research suggests that the secret to developing effective leaders is to encourage four types of behavior. A McKinsey Quarterly article.

Via Anne Leong
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5 Things You Must Do to Retain Millennial Workers

5 Things You Must Do to Retain Millennial Workers | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
There's a new generation hitting the workplace, and it'll take a new type of office culture to get them to stick around.
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3 Things Great Leaders Do With Their Anger

3 Things Great Leaders Do With Their Anger | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Why great leaders don't blame people, circumstances, or conditions for their anger.
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5 Non-Evil Ways To Get People To Do What You Want, From Dan Pink

5 Non-Evil Ways To Get People To Do What You Want, From Dan Pink | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Science has some answers about how to deal with difficult people. Here NYT bestselling author Dan Pink breaks down how to make people behave better.
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This is a better predictor of your success than IQ or EQ

This is a better predictor of your success than IQ or EQ | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

An unsettling classroom experience near the start of his second year in the Stanford Graduate School of Business MBA Program caused a personal crisis for Shirzad Chamine and led him to the work he’s doing more than a quarter century later. The 1987 class was Interpersonal Dynamics, nicknamed “Touchy-Feely” for the way it has highly analytical students explore the softer side of business. One day, students took turns telling their classmates how each was coming across, and one after another, they told Chamine that he gave the impression of constantly and secretly judging them—even a classmate whom Chamine greatly admired. Chamine’s genial façade wasn’t fooling anyone.

 

 

Devastated by this feedback, he panicked that he had no clue how to change. Within two weeks, though, Chamine, who had grown up in a turbulent, emotionally abusive home in Iran, had a helpful insight.

 

Noticing judgmental behaviors that he thought others might be using as well in an effort to disguise insecurities, he poured out his thoughts into a five-page typed letter to first-year students. The letter touched its audience, especially the many students stressed or saddened by academic and social pressure—so much so that 26 years later, it is still in circulation among students. After receiving “tons of thank-you letters,” the 1988 graduate knew he was on to something. “That’s when I felt reassured that ‘the judge’ tends to be universal,” even if not in the extreme form he saw in himself.

 

 

After more reading and soul-searching, Chamine came to think of this judge as what he calls a “Saboteur,” one of several figurative villains that he says can reside in normal human minds. “Your mind is your best friend, but it is also your very worst enemy,” he says, calling the best-friend part your “Sage,” the voice of authenticity, calm and positive emotion. The Saboteurs—which, besides the Judge, include such instantly recognizable types as the Victim, the Avoider, the Hyper-Achiever and six others—undermine you by triggering anger, anxiety, shame, regret and other negative emotions. “Pretty much all your suffering in life is self-generated by your Saboteurs,” Chamine says.

 

 

The good news, which evangelist Chamine has been sharing through lectures, a popular book Positive Intelligence, and executive coaching, is that you can choose at any moment which voice to listen to. “That choice makes all the difference in not only how happy you are, but whether you reach your true potential,” says Chamine, who for many years ran the Coaches Training Institute, a San Rafael, Calif.-based company that trains executive coaches and life coaches.

 

 

Backed by data

 

Research in positive psychology, neuroscience and even organization science supports many of Chamine’s claims. Psychologists have long observed a human tendency to attend disproportionately to the negatives, since our ancestors’ survival was aided when they noticed threats. Brain-imaging studies have shown the seats of various emotions, suggesting that creating a positive mental state requires activating one area and quieting another. Experiments on happiness interventions have shown ways to foster optimism, compassion and other good feelings. And studies by organizational scholars have shown that happier people and teams make for more productive workers.

 

 

The finding that links happiness with productivity owes much to the work of Stanford University alumna Barbara Fredrickson, who received her PhD in psychology in 1990. Now a professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, she is best-known for her “broaden and build” theory of positive emotions. The theory explains why, given that natural selection favored negativity, evolution would have left us with positive emotions at all: Whereas negative emotions narrow our focus to handle an urgent challenge, Fredrickson argues, positive emotions broaden our options, enabling us to play, to explore, to think more creatively, and to build human connections. If negativity aids survival, positivity makes it possible to thrive. As a result, people with higher ratios of positive to negative emotions are more likely to flourish in life, experiencing better health, more satisfying relationships and greater professional achievement.

 

 

Chamine uses a similar metric he calls the positivity quotient, or the fraction of all your emotional experiences that are positive. PQ, he says, is more important for your success than your IQ or your EQ (emotional intelligence). Many of the executives he coaches, he says, have tried to raise their EQ, with little lasting success. EQ training teaches self-awareness and self-management, among other skills, but it misses a crucial component, Chamine believes. “What EQ training doesn’t tackle are the Saboteurs, who, left untouched, quickly reclaim their power.”

 

 

Helping people raise their PQ

 

Chamine’s goal is practical: He wants to help everyone, from children to executives, raise their PQ. Through his coaching practice, he’s refined techniques designed to weaken the Saboteurs (for starters, by learning to spot them in action) and strengthen the Sage, starting with understanding that an optimistic attitude becomes self-fulfilling. For example, he recommends a thought experiment involving identical twins who face a setback in opposite ways: One blames himself or others, while the second one says, “I can turn this failure into an opportunity.” Guess which twin will be better able to muster the internal resources, such as compassion and curiosity, to overcome the setback? “When your Judge says you’re screwed, you are screwed,” Chamine says.

 

 

Many of the exercises Chamine uses, like the twin experiment, are almost like little games. Others, like the mindfulness exercise that has you focus on a bodily sensation for 10 seconds, sound less fun, and, in fact, Chamine prescribes a number of “reps,” as if you were counting crunches at the gym. Fun or not, you have to stick with the program. The effort, though, can bear unexpected fruit.

 

 

“One of the biggest lies is that success leads to happiness,” Chamine says, rather than the other way around. “The biggest insight is that the happy brain is a more capable, more creative, more resourceful brain.”


Via Jim Manske
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Google’s Scientific Approach to Work-Life Balance (and Much More)

Google’s Scientific Approach to Work-Life Balance (and Much More) | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
A new longitudinal survey seeks to quantify worker satisfaction, teamwork, and more.
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Tal Ben Shahar : Positive psychology

Tal Ben Shahar is a teacher and writer in the areas of positive psychology and leadership. Discover his philosophy. -- Want to join our community and hear mo...

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An Introvert’s Guide to Networking

An Introvert’s Guide to Networking | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it

You’ve probably heard conventional advice about networking: Practice your elevator pitch, try approaching people standing alone (they’ll be happy someone is talking to them), memorize icebreaker questions (“How did you hear about this group?” “What’s the most difficult part of your job?”)

Those are fine pieces of advice for certain kinds of events and certain kinds of people (ahem, extroverts). But what if the thought of going to such an event in the first place fills you with anxiety?

Then you might just be an introvert.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 20, 5:24 PM

Here’s how to make networking easier by doing as much as possible at home.

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25 Disruptive Technology Trends 2015 - 2016

Brian Solis explores some of the biggest technology trends and possible twists on the horizon for 2015 and 2016. Topics include cyber security, mobile payments…

Via Trudy Raymakers
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What Makes Leaders Innovative? New Study Identifies The 10 Keys

What Makes Leaders Innovative? New Study Identifies The 10 Keys | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
“All the money in the world, all the research and development resources in the world aren’t really worth a hoot, without innovative leadership.  Money does not follow ideas; it follows leaders,” said Forbes Contributor Henry Doss in his recent post about innovation. Many organizations would like to create more innovative [...]

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's curator insight, January 24, 3:55 PM

#innovación #liderazgo

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Materialism makes you a broke jerk, says science

Materialism makes you a broke jerk, says science | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Being obsessed with stuff is eating your money, relationships, and soul, according to psychologist Tim Kasser.

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 15, 7:30 AM

The downside of materialism!

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The Future Of Leadership Coaching

The Future Of Leadership Coaching | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Five highlights from the April 30-May 2, 2014 NY gathering organized by the Institute of Coaching, .Conference provided a chance to hear candidly from the front lines about the future of leadership coaching – concerns facing today’s leaders, issues trending in the market, and innovative strategies emerging to coach and support leaders as they navigate business challenges.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, PhD, Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:27 AM

Some perceptive insights for coaches and leaders.

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Fostering leadership: confessions of a mega-company founder

Fostering leadership: confessions of a mega-company founder | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
Fostering leadership in your company or team can be a tremendous challenge, but the founder of a multi-billion dollar company tells us how their brand has done just that.

Via Anne Leong
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Dave Guerra's curator insight, January 7, 11:36 AM

Founder, CEO, Custodian, Receptionist it doesn't matter, EVERYONE must foster leadership otherwise why bother?

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Overwhelmed HR fails to harness power of talent data, says study - People Management Magazine Online

Overwhelmed HR fails to harness power of talent data, says study - People Management Magazine Online | leadership 3.0 | Scoop.it
HR is 'deluged' with employee data like never before, yet 77 per cent of HR professionals admitted they don't know how their workforce talent can improve the bottom line (Overwhelmed HR fails to harness power of talent data, says study - People Management...

Via Andrée Laforge
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Andrée Laforge's curator insight, February 26, 2013 10:56 AM

Un déluge d'informations! À qui le dites-vous!