Leader of Pedagogy
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Leader of Pedagogy
A collection of scoops aimed at understanding and improving teaching pedagogies in education.
Curated by Ness Crouch
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Rescooped by Ness Crouch from Teaching history with ICT
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QR Codes in the Classroom

QR Codes in the Classroom | Leader of Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Quick response (QR) codes are easy to create and have many uses in the classroom. With the posting of a QR code, you can lead students to information by just using their computer's or mobile device's...

Via Catherine Smyth
Ness Crouch's insight:

There are many affordances for QR codes in history. Pose an historical inquiry question and get students to gather clues (evidence) using primary sources embedded with a QR code at a museum, local community, school etc. Or, get primary students to create their own QR codes for artefacts. This could engage students in historical inquiry and the analysis and use of primary and secondary sources.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 7, 2015 10:46 PM

There are many affordances for QR codes in history. Pose an historical inquiry question and get students to gather clues (evidence) using primary sources embedded with a QR code at a museum, local community, school etc. Or, get primary students to create their own QR codes for artefacts. This could engage students in historical inquiry and the analysis and use of primary and secondary sources.

Rescooped by Ness Crouch from Teaching history with ICT
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Hovis - Go On Lad (2008, UK)

Considered to be one of the best British adverts ever made, and uploaded in HD, unlike the other uploads. Created by Rattling Stick with post production by T...

Via Catherine Smyth
Ness Crouch's insight:

This ad is a historical narrative which captures change and continuity, significance, cause and effect very nicely.

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Christine Gray's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:49 PM

So many possibilities -create timelines with dipity.com

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, September 12, 2014 1:59 AM

This ad is a historical narrative which captures change and continuity, significance, cause and effect very nicely.

Rescooped by Ness Crouch from Teaching history with ICT
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Dipity - Find, Create, and Embed Interactive Timelines

Dipity - Find, Create, and Embed Interactive Timelines | Leader of Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Create an interactive, visually engaging timeline in minutes. Use dynamic visualization tools to display photos, videos, news and blogs in chronological order.

Via Catherine Smyth
Ness Crouch's insight:

Timelines are a way to organise historical information. However, dates alone do not allow students to vlsualise the time being referred to. Dipity is a useful tool to help students associate their visual images of history with the corresponding dates. Timelines should be comparative to help students see what life was life for a range of people at a given time.

Understanding historical time includes two important aspects: 1) chronology which is being able to order moments in time; and 2) being able to match moments in time to specific dates. Research suggests children find it easier to sequence historical pictures than assign dates or names to historical periods (Barton, 1994,2002; Barton and Levstik, 1996).

As children get older, they become better at ordering historical pictures on the basis of clues in technology, fashion and social roles. Primary children know what dates sound like and usually know what the current year is, but they find it difficult to associate periods in history with specific years.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:37 AM

Timelines are a way to organise historical information. However, dates alone do not allow students to vlsualise the time being referred to. Dipity is a useful tool to help students associate their visual images of history with the corresponding dates. Timelines should be comparative to help students see what life was life for a range of people at a given time.

Understanding historical time includes two important aspects: 1) chronology which is being able to order moments in time; and 2) being able to match moments in time to specific dates. Research suggests children find it easier to sequence historical pictures than assign dates or names to historical periods (Barton, 1994,2002; Barton and Levstik, 1996).

As children get older, they become better at ordering historical pictures on the basis of clues in technology, fashion and social roles. Primary children know what dates sound like and usually know what the current year is, but they find it difficult to associate periods in history with specific years.

Petrina Hentschke's curator insight, July 17, 2014 7:26 PM

Timeline

Rescooped by Ness Crouch from Teaching history with ICT
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Digital Story-Telling Guide


Via Catherine Smyth
Ness Crouch's insight:

A practical guide for constructing digital stories.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, October 20, 2014 3:21 AM

A practical guide for constructing digital stories.

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Call for proposals for OZeLIVE 2014!

Call for proposals for OZeLIVE 2014! | Leader of Pedagogy | Scoop.it
We now invite all educators to post their presentation proposals for the inaugural OZeLIVE event for February 22 - 23 2014.
Ness Crouch's insight:

This conference is being organised by a group of Australia and Asian volunteers with the help of Steve Hargadon. We are hoping to gather a great group of Key Notes and Presenters to share their knowledge in various areas of education, but in particular ICT. 

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Rescooped by Ness Crouch from Teaching history with ICT
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VoiceThread - About - Digital Library

VoiceThread - About - Digital Library | Leader of Pedagogy | Scoop.it

The 5th Grade teacher on this website uses 'Voicethread' with historical photographs. Click on the video "Ellis Island" to see how primary students build a historical narrative around a visual image. Voice thread transforms media into collaborative spaces with video, voice, and text commenting.

 

Don't underestimate the importance of historical language in developing historical understanding. Provide opportunities for students to expand their historical vocabulary and to use language for a variety of purposes.

Young students need explicit instructions for when and how to use conventions of language.

 

Husbands (1996) identifies different types of historical language including:

1. The language of the past (e.g. convict, First Fleet, monarchy, revolution)

2. The language of historical time (century, period, modern, decade)

3. The language of historical processes (cause, chronology, similarity, difference)

4. The language of historical description and analysis (revolution, monarchy, democracy)

 

Use 'Word Walls' or word charts to help students keep track of information and terminology that is used in a Unit of Work and keep adding new words.

 

 


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Education Creations's curator insight, June 5, 2014 9:05 PM

Use Voicethread and historical photographs to create digital historical narratives.  Much more engaging than the written version.