Le mot juste
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by andrew fung
Scoop.it!

World's top 100 universities 2013: their reputations ranked by Times Higher Education

World's top 100 universities 2013: their reputations ranked by Times Higher Education | Le mot juste | Scoop.it
Harvard has topped a reputation ranking of worldwide universities, with US institutions taking more than 40 places onthe top 100 rankings complied by Times Higher Education. Get the full data (Look who is ranked#12 in the world!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by andrew fung from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

The MOOC Revolution: A Sketchy Deal for Higher Education | Dissent Magazine

The MOOC Revolution: A Sketchy Deal for Higher Education | Dissent Magazine | Le mot juste | Scoop.it

The fact that we now look to the Silicon Valley to “democratize” education indicates how successful that project has been: even those who care about public goods like universal access to education are willing to let the world of hi-tech entrepreneurship take up the burden.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 15, 2013 10:11 AM

A rather critical look at MOOCs and their role in the future of education. Well less critical of the MOOCs and more so of the companies that provide them.

Scooped by andrew fung
Scoop.it!

Save Your Voice, Save Your Career

Experts from Duke Voice Care Center talk about voice problems for occupational voice users such as singers and teachers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by andrew fung
Scoop.it!

State Business Roundtable Discusses Higher Education

State Business Roundtable Discusses Higher Education | Le mot juste | Scoop.it
State Business Roundtable Discusses Higher Education (.@BusLeadersforMI #HigherEd workshop bring together state, national leaders in business, academia http://t.co/mWhY4yETDp @NAE_DC @DBusiness)...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by andrew fung from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Online learning: It’s different

Online learning: It’s different | Le mot juste | Scoop.it
By interspersing online lectures with short tests, student mind-wandering decreased by half, note-taking tripled, and overall retention of the material improved, said Daniel Schacter, the William R. Kenan Jr.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by andrew fung from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Exploration of ePortfolios for Adding Value and Deepening Student Learning in Contemporary Higher Education

While much has been written about the use of learning technologies generally and about ePortfolios in particular, there has been a lack of robust evidence about their added value for enhancing student learning opportunities. A case study of the integration of ePortfolios into a professional development master’s program in a Higher Education Institution in Ireland is presented, and added value in terms of the creative learning process is explored.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 15, 2013 3:15 AM

Looks like a useful read.

John Paul Loucky's comment, April 15, 2013 4:16 AM
Yes does look useful but sadly Scoop.it does NOT support this type of doc. Pls upload it in format that does! On CALL Evaluation also pls see: http://www.ict4lt.org/en/evalform.doc
Evaluation Forms for CALL from ICT4lt:
Evaluating CALL Software, Websites and Multimedia Software
vananh.com's comment, April 20, 2013 7:39 AM
thanks 4 ur sharing !
Rescooped by andrew fung from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Writing as discovery

Writing as discovery | Le mot juste | Scoop.it

Professor Jill Lepore delivered the third and final presentation in Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds’ book talks in the Widener Library rotunda. The series was designed to bring students and faculty together outside of the classroom.

When Jill Lepore receives an assignment, she rarely ever follows it. This may seem off for a Harvard professor who routinely doles out assignments to students. But Lepore, an accomplished author of several books and a writer for The New Yorker, explained that she doesn’t simply disregard the assignment, it’s just that her natural curiosity and research expertise often leads her in other directions.

“No matter what I am asked to write about, I try to find an original story to tell that hasn’t been told before, and that involves, for me, the fun of archival discovery,” said Lepore. “And it is also kind of a point of professional pride, thinking that there has to be something in there that no one has ever found before.”

Lepore spoke to a packed house in the Widener Library rotunda, delivering the third and final installment in Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds’ Book Talk Series. The series was developed in coordination with the Undergraduate Council to allow students to further engage with faculty outside of the classroom and other traditional academic settings.

“This is such a beautiful space here in Widener Library and such an extraordinary place to have these kinds of discussions that bring together students and staff to talk with members of our distinguished faculty,” said Hammonds, who is the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies.

Lepore’s latest book, “The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death” is a collection of essays that examine society’s ideas about the subject. In an essay called “The Lion and the Mouse,” Lepore explores the history of the attempt to ban E.B. White’s “Stuart Little.” The start of that idea came when Lepore was asked to review a book about the history of children’s literature. In reading the book, Lepore said she came across a “throwaway remark” about the banning of “Stuart Little.”


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
Rescooped by andrew fung from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

The Writer’s Technique in Thirteen Theses: Walter Benjamin’s Timeless Advice on Writing

The Writer’s Technique in Thirteen Theses: Walter Benjamin’s Timeless Advice on Writing | Le mot juste | Scoop.it

The more circumspectly you delay writing down an idea, the more maturely developed it will be on surrendering itself.”

“Write with the door closed, rewrite with the door open,” Stephen King advised. “Do back exercises,”Margaret Atwood suggested. “Know everything about adjectives and punctuation, have moral intelligence,” Susan Sontag counseled. Each accomplished author seems to have a different secret to the craft of writing, but some of the most enduring advice comes from legendary German literary critic, philosopher, and essayists Walter Benjamin. Under a section titled “Post No Bills” in his 1928 treatise One-Way Street, found in his indispensable Reflections: Essays, Aphorisms, Autobiographical Writings (public library), Benjamin offers thirteen essentials of the writer’s technique, touching on familiar themes like the value of keeping a notebook (Virginia Woolf), the incubation period of ideas (T. S. Eliot), the role of discipline (Henry Miller), and the distinct stages of writing (Malcolm Cowley):

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/04/15/the-writers-technique-in-thirteen-theses-walter-benjamin/


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by andrew fung from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Seven Tales of learning online with emerging technologies

During the last few years, emerging technologies and online learning have dominated narratives regarding the future of education and the potential role that tec

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.