Le Marche
Follow
Find
59 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
onto Le Marche
Scoop.it!

Introduction to skiiing in the Italian Appenines, Le Marche, Italy

Introduction to skiiing in the Italian Appenines, Le Marche, Italy | Le Marche | Scoop.it

Having experienced skiiing for the very first time, I would like to share some information about Sassotetto, high in the Sibillini mountains near Sarnano, Le Marche, and part of the Italian Appenines. For novice skiers, this resort is ideal since it is relatively inexpensive and accessible. It is possible to stay at the resort itself - there are several hotels, although we chose to stay near Sarnano and take the daily shuttle bus to the resort. There are two main centres at Sasso Tetto; Sasso Tetto and La Maddalena. We went to the latter and having walked the short distance from the bus to the ski school, enquired about an hour's lesson.
We were surprised that the lesson price was so reasonable; €30 for an hour for an individual but €40 for two people (See the detailed Sibillini Ski School price list). Our instructor was Domenico; although he probably spoke a little English we opted for our lesson in Italian. The hire of ski boots, skis and sticks was a reasonable €10 per person for the day, and once we were kitted out, he took us to the nursery slope for some tuition.


Via Mariano Pallottini
Grahame Edwards's insight:

All this (and more) is an easy 15 minute drive from Bellavallone - www.bellavallone.com - reservations@bellavallone.com

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
Scoop.it!

Le Marche Travel Guide

Le Marche Travel Guide | Le Marche | Scoop.it
Le Marche is a microcosm of everything tourists love about Italy—breathtaking landscapes, medieval architecture and terrific wine and food—minus the crowds.

Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:28 AM

This is one of the best articles of the season about Le Marche, it is a sort of a mini guide for everyone but especially for gourmands and wine lovers, for lovers of genuine people and the originality of the products. For all lovers of life and beauty. 

Sarah Topps's curator insight, February 12, 2014 9:48 AM

A great travel guide for anyone who loves Le Marche and is thinking about coming here for a visit.


Carolyn Kyprios at Villa Miramonti, Le Marche's curator insight, February 12, 2014 10:11 AM

A useful guide to our local wine growing areas. Murola and Dezi are near to Villa Miramonti and the Ciu ciu shop is in nearby Montegiorgio!

Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
Scoop.it!

Caffè Meletti | The best cafe in the world

Caffè Meletti | The best cafe in the world | Le Marche | Scoop.it

This is the best cafe in the world. It is the Anisetta Meletti in Ascoli Piceno, which is a mouthful. It is in the Marche region of Italy, north of the more famous Abruzzi region.

The building is original, nothing changed since World War II. Wooden doors and tables, gold leaf on the windows, marble bar with brass foot rail. They make a famous house brand of Anis and some other liquors.

The barmen wear bow ties; they are professional. You order a Cafe Americano, they set it on the counter three minutes later with a small glass of water, steamed milk, and a biscuit. One Euro thirty cents. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
Grahame Edwards's insight:
Not sure if it is the best in the world but it must be pretty close
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche
Scoop.it!

The Feast of the Epiphany and Celebration of La Befana

The Feast of the Epiphany and Celebration of La Befana | Le Marche | Scoop.it

According to the Italian legend, La Befana, a witch-like woman riding on a broom, refused to join the Wise Men on their journey to see the baby Jesus. When she regrets her decision, she sets out to bring gifts to the Child but never finds him. Instead, she leaves gifts for other children. Italian children leave out their shoes or put up stockings for the Befana to fill on January 5th, Epiphany Eve.

And the legend continues that every Epiphany Eve, the old, tattered and soot-covered Befana flies around the world on a broomstick and comes down chimneys to deliver candy and presents to children who have been good during the year. For those who have fallen a bit short of model behavior, la Befana will leave lumps of coal.  Knowing that all kids can’t be perfect year-round, some shops in Italy sell carbone or black rock candy that actually looks like pieces of coal…so even those not quite perfect can still enjoy a sweet treat.

Unlike Santa Claus, La Befana has been an Italian tradition since the XIII century and comes from Christian legend rather than pop culture.

The arrival of la Befana is celebrated with traditional Italian foods such as panettone and marks the end of the long and festive holiday season in Italy. In honor of the Three Wise Men, Italians go to church and enjoy spending the day with family. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini, Grahame Edwards
more...
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche & Fashion
Scoop.it!

Fashion tips by Franceschetti Shoes: The Monkstrap Shoe

Fashion tips by Franceschetti Shoes: The Monkstrap Shoe | Le Marche | Scoop.it

The monkstrap, mostly known as the shoe with the buckle. It is essentially a derby, not closed by laces, but through a side band which ends with a buckle. This model wraps the instep dressing it up to make it elegant because of the buckle, that gives it an authoritative touch … almost noble. It’s a shoe that carries with itself a certain charm: it was the shoe of the nobles between 1600 and 1800, but it is also the shoe of the Three Musketeers and that of the Pirates. Its origins seem to be, however, very modest. It seems to orginate from the monks’ sandals laced on one side.
Nowadays there are many versions: they go from the smooth leather versions to the brogued ones, and buckles can be from one to three. The advantage of this shoe is that it hasn’t the drawback of possible breakage of the laces, but it’s preferable to wear it with a straight and not too long pant, otherwise the buckle may get caught with the hem. It is for this reason that the monkstrap is very fashionable this season. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
Grahame Edwards's insight:

Le Marche is a fantastic place to purchase a range of leather products; bags, jackets and of course, shoes.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
Scoop.it!

Introduction to skiiing in the Italian Appenines, Le Marche, Italy

Introduction to skiiing in the Italian Appenines, Le Marche, Italy | Le Marche | Scoop.it

Having experienced skiiing for the very first time, I would like to share some information about Sassotetto, high in the Sibillini mountains near Sarnano, Le Marche, and part of the Italian Appenines. For novice skiers, this resort is ideal since it is relatively inexpensive and accessible. It is possible to stay at the resort itself - there are several hotels, although we chose to stay near Sarnano and take the daily shuttle bus to the resort. There are two main centres at Sasso Tetto; Sasso Tetto and La Maddalena. We went to the latter and having walked the short distance from the bus to the ski school, enquired about an hour's lesson.
We were surprised that the lesson price was so reasonable; €30 for an hour for an individual but €40 for two people (See the detailed Sibillini Ski School price list). Our instructor was Domenico; although he probably spoke a little English we opted for our lesson in Italian. The hire of ski boots, skis and sticks was a reasonable €10 per person for the day, and once we were kitted out, he took us to the nursery slope for some tuition.


Via Mariano Pallottini
Grahame Edwards's insight:

All this (and more) is an easy 15 minute drive from Bellavallone - www.bellavallone.com - reservations@bellavallone.com

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
Scoop.it!

A day in caves and small towns #exploringmarche

A day in caves and small towns #exploringmarche | Le Marche | Scoop.it

After spending the morning in Senigallia we drove to the mountains. Incredible views of the hills and mountainsides, and random caves just popping up on the side of the road. Obviously we had to stop every ten minutes or so! [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, January 16, 2014 3:51 PM
  • Genga
  • Fabriano
  • Paper & Watermark Museum
  • Frasassi Caves (Grotte di Frasassi)
  • Wine tasting at Luchetti
Read More, click on the photo
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche another Italy
Scoop.it!

The Feast of the Epiphany and Celebration of La Befana

The Feast of the Epiphany and Celebration of La Befana | Le Marche | Scoop.it

According to the Italian legend, La Befana, a witch-like woman riding on a broom, refused to join the Wise Men on their journey to see the baby Jesus. When she regrets her decision, she sets out to bring gifts to the Child but never finds him. Instead, she leaves gifts for other children. Italian children leave out their shoes or put up stockings for the Befana to fill on January 5th, Epiphany Eve.

And the legend continues that every Epiphany Eve, the old, tattered and soot-covered Befana flies around the world on a broomstick and comes down chimneys to deliver candy and presents to children who have been good during the year. For those who have fallen a bit short of model behavior, la Befana will leave lumps of coal.  Knowing that all kids can’t be perfect year-round, some shops in Italy sell carbone or black rock candy that actually looks like pieces of coal…so even those not quite perfect can still enjoy a sweet treat.

Unlike Santa Claus, La Befana has been an Italian tradition since the XIII century and comes from Christian legend rather than pop culture.

The arrival of la Befana is celebrated with traditional Italian foods such as panettone and marks the end of the long and festive holiday season in Italy. In honor of the Three Wise Men, Italians go to church and enjoy spending the day with family. [...]


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Rescooped by Grahame Edwards from Le Marche and Food
Scoop.it!

Food history and culture of Le Marche

Food history and culture of Le Marche | Le Marche | Scoop.it

This is the first complete historical reconstruction of the food culture of the Le Marche region in central Italy. The book describes both popular rustic traditions and those of the aristocracy and middle classes, analyzing their interactions in both written and verbal forms.
The authors Ugo Bellesi, Ettore Franca and Tommaso Lucchetti, in addition to various specialists, attempt to reconstruct the sources of these regional traditions. There are illustrations of information collected during archeological digs, as well as historical and artistic studies. The book also includes prints from archives, libraries and private and public collections, creating a mosaic of documents presented together for the first time.
The first section of the work is a detailed look at the agrarian landscape, farmland and typical products. This is followed by a description of the local cuisine, including both simple dishes and more refined recipes from monasteries, the nobility and middle classes, documented in archives and books written by Antonio Latini, Antonio Nebbia and Cesare Tirabasso. This analysis reveals that there has always been a certain “fluidity” between the different classes and generations in Le Marche. The third part of the book is dedicated to images of the arts and conviviality.
This work is a useful bibliography, enriched with iconographic images as well as deep and complex cultural material about Le Marche.


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:48 AM

The book has conquered several prizes:

Special Prize of the Jury of the Premio l'Italia delle tipicità. Enogastronomia e Cultura" 2013, promoted by the Italian Association of Book and Res Tipica
Award "Orio Vergani" 2010 of the Italian cuisine, the award
Gourmand 2010 as the best cuisine history book of Italy
Gourmand, as the best world cuisine history book

Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:28 AM

The book has conquered several prizes:

  • Special Prize of the Jury of the Premio l'Italia delle tipicità. Enogastronomia e Cultura" 2013, promoted by the Italian Association of Book and Res Tipica
  • Award "Orio Vergani" 2010 of the Italian cuisine award
  • Gourmand 2010 as the best cuisine history book of Italy
  • Gourmand, as the best world cuisine history book