Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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The Beautiful Stories of the WWII in Le Marche: Gino and the three POWs from Camp 59 in Servigliano

The Beautiful Stories of the WWII in Le Marche: Gino and the three POWs from Camp 59 in Servigliano | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Four or five days after the prison breakout at Camp 59 in Servigliano - on September 14, 1943 - Gino and his family were approached at their home by three Englishmen. With gestures, while talking in English, they indicated they needed food and shelter.
In the weeks after the Armistice, the Germans took full control of the territory. They conducted inspections along the road systems and raids into private houses to capture the escaped Allied soldiers.
When fascists and Germans found escaped POWs in some of the houses, those houses were burned down. In order to protect his family, Gino, then 17 years old, dug a cave-shelter for the men in a steep slope in his family’s woods. [...]

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Freedom Trail in the Marche : Monte San Martino Trust

Freedom Trail in the Marche : Monte San Martino Trust | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

This is a diary covering the Freedom Trail, based on Servigliano in the Tenna Valley, from September 4th-9th, 2013, commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Armistice with Italy, the event that precipitated the mass break-out of Allied servicemen from prisoner of war camps in Italy. The Trail was organised jointly by the Escape Lines Memorial Society and the Monte San Martino Trust.

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Monte San Martino Trust  www

Camp 59 (Servigliano)  Survivors  www

Ken De Souza www


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Maybe the last remaining wood fired pottery in Italy

Maybe the last remaining wood fired pottery in Italy | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

...After coffee we set off to drive to the last remaining wood fired pottery in Italy. A most unpretentious place just outside the walls of the town that has been run by the same family for over a century and which sells its wares all over the world.

Greg, Kay and the proprietor with some of his yet-unglazed pottery. You can see what I mean by unpretentious, right?

And this is the wood fired kiln. They also have a couple of modern kilns too.

We bought some exquisite wine and water jugs and a couple of other pieces. 

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Survivors of Camp 59 - Experiences of the Allied Servicemen who were Prisoners of War at Servigliano, Le Marche

Survivors of Camp 59 - Experiences of the Allied Servicemen who were Prisoners of War at Servigliano, Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Survivors of Camp 59 is dedicated to the memory of Allied servicemen who were prisoners of war at Campo 59 in Servigliano, Italy, during World War II.

Recorded here are accounts of the experiences of the men who survived their stay at Servigliano. This site also serves as a memorial to those who perished in the camp or in their effort to escape.

This site contains many accounts of bravery of the Italians who risked their own lives to protect the escaped prisoners.

A plaque installed by the local council in 1993 at the site of the prison camp explains:

“After the Armistice of September 8, 1943, 3,000 Allied prisoners escaped through the opening they had dug on the west side of this camp. They will forever be grateful for the immediate and courageous generosity shown by the Italian people.”

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e33bb9a7-37f0-42ef-8244-02f8138a0a53's comment, November 19, 2011 7:37 AM
This is a fascinating and very poignant site, uniting many different nationalities in the unknown story of the courage and kindness of Italian contadini during the war. Anyone with any records should contact the site to ensure their family's story is recorded for posterity
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A Prisoner's Son Visits Servigliano

A Prisoner's Son Visits Servigliano | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Ed Cronin and his wife Susan of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, visited Servigliano (Le Marche) in September in order to see the site of Camp 59, where Ed’s father, Clarence “Tom” Cronin, was a prisoner of war during WW II. [...]

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Camp 59 Servigliano: Twenty-five Years After the Escape

Camp 59 Servigliano: Twenty-five Years After the Escape | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Felice “Phil” Vacca escaped from PG 59 in September 1943, along with fellow American prisoners Peter Calvagno, Edmond Petrelli, Joe Mandese, and Tony Spicola.

I have been in touch recently with Mario and Tony Vacca, two of Phil’s three sons. They’ve sent me a wealth of material that I will divide into separate posts.
This first post concerns Tony’s contact with the Virgili family and his first visit to Camp 59. That visit occurred in 1968, 25 years after Phil and his companions escaped from the camp.
While stationed in Pisa during the 1960s, Tony made contact with members of the Virgili family of Monte San Martino in the Marche—Sergio Virgili, and his sisters Luigia and Elena—who assisted his father during the war.
Tony explains, “It was on my second visit to the Virgili’s that I went to see the prison camp at Servigliano and to take photos for my father, per his request.
“Sergio Virgili guided me to the camp. It was a cloudy, dreary day. As we drove through Servigliano, I got an eerie feeling, as I could hear someone playing ‘Taps’ on the trumpet.
“Sergio took me straight to the main gate of the camp and we parked. “That’s where I took the picture of Sergio standing at the front gate.
“It was like stepping into a ‘ghost town.’ It was very quiet—just Sergio and me – it was like the world stood frozen in time without occupants. The buildings showed signs of deterioration and were locked to prevent anyone from trying to live in them. As I walked around taking photos, I could not help but wonder what the living conditions would have been like for the prisoners. My father made very little mention of his experiences there.
“The only building that was pointed out to me was the guard shack by the gate. At the time I only speculated which buildings were the barracks.
“There were rectangular stone islands of sorts outside, located between buildings. They looked like some sort of outdoor wash stations.
“We also visited the train station across from the camp, which my father had told me about.
As a matter of fact, I have a small book, Il Campo Di Servigliano, 1915–1955, published by Casa della Memoria, which contains a map of the camp, with building locations, and some photos. The map layout is pretty much as I remember the building positions.”

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The story of a Family from Ortezzano that helped a prisoner escaped from Camp 59 of Servigliano

The story of a Family from Ortezzano that helped a prisoner escaped from Camp 59 of Servigliano | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

When Albert Rosenblum  and three fellow prisoners escaped from Camp 59, they decided that south was the best direction to travel to reach the Allied lines.

They had no food or water, no weapons, and they were in foreign territory wearing their prison military uniforms. All the prisoners were malnourished from the inadequate food supply at Camp 59.

As they neared the town of Ortezzano (Fermo Province), sympathetic locals put them in touch with the Partisans. The Partisans fed them and provided less conspicuous civilian clothing.

The Americans, all experienced as infantrymen and schooled in escape and evasion techniques, wanted to try to reach the Allies. They asked for an Italian guide to lead them through enemy lines.

The Partisans, however, felt it was too dangerous and...

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