Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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La Muta Speaks | Urbino Project 2015

La Muta Speaks | Urbino Project 2015 | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

La Muta is a portrait of a sitting woman with no expression. The background is calm. Intriguing to viewers yet questionable to past critics, the painting is a classic Renaissance work. [...]

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Rachel Dale tells you about the restoration of the most Leonardesque painting of Raphael and among the best portraits by his hand. Read how the birthplace of the artist assisted two times to the return of the work.

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36 Hours In... Urbino - Telegraph

36 Hours In... Urbino - Telegraph | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The one-time cultural capital of the Renaissance lures fewer visitors than its rival cities across the Apennines. People don’t know what they’re missing, says Nick Trend.
The new exhibition that opened at the National Gallery today showcases the work of the virtuoso late-Renaissance painter, Federico Barocci. Highly prized in his lifetime, he was then half-forgotten by succeeding generations, only to be rediscovered centuries later. In a way, the same is true of Urbino, his home town, and also birthplace of the more enduringly-famous Raphael.
It is an idyllic hill town where houses and palaces of weathered brick and pantiles cluster around steep narrow streets, with misty mountains stretching mysteriously beyond, like the background of a Leonardo portrait. But, because it is on the opposite side of the Apennines to Florence and Siena, Perugia and Assissi, like Barocci, Urbino has been half-forgotten by tourists and art lovers.
They are missing a treat. In its time – the 15th and 16th centuries – this was one of the cultural capitals of the Renaissance. Piero della Francesca came here to paint and write on perspective , as did Ucello, and Raphael’s father, and the great architects Laurana and Martini.
In short, this matches any hill town in Tuscany or Umbria, with a fraction of the visitors. Prices are lower, the sights less crowded and the people friendlier. Go this spring, while the peace lasts, after getting a taste for the Barocci’s brilliant paintings at the National Gallery.
Where to stay (click)
Arrival

  • 9pm - Take in the evening passeggiata around the Piazza della Republica, for a first impression of this university town with a young, laid-back feel. Just around the corner is the Taverna Fornarina (4), serving traditional specialities in a relaxed, family-run atmosphere. (Here, and in all the recommended restaurants below, you can have a good meal for 30 euros including wine). If you want to stay up late with the young crowd, the current in place to drink is Bunker 83 (5) on via Nuova, just off the piazza.

Day one

  • 10am - Explore the Ducal Palace (6) and the National Gallery of Le Marche (palazzoducaleurbino.it; entrance €5). The palace is one of the great Italian buildings of the 15th century – the central courtyard is particularly elegant, with fine Corinthian capitals around the arcades. Built by the town’s great patron, Duke Frederico of Montefeltro, it is a rambling pile which appears to shore up the western side of the town. Its rooms include a first-class collection of works by Raphael, Piero della Francesca, Uccello, Titian and Barocci. But the highlight for me is the Duke’s tiny studiolo lined with brilliantly effective trompe-l’oeil intarsia (inlaid wood) depicting shelves, books, music instruments and animals. It is one of only two such rooms to survive from the Italian Renaissance.
  • 1pm - The palace cafe, just off the main courtyard, is a good place for a drink and a light sandwich lunch.

  • 2pm - After lunch, pop into the cathedral, immediately next door to the palace. The 16th-century church was substantially rebuilt after an earthquake in 1789 with a grand neo-classical facade. It is home to three of Barocci’s paintings: a couple of early works, and a great Last Supper which, when it returns from the exhibition at the National Gallery in London, will hang once more in the Ducal Chapel next to the high altar (a copy is currently on display). Next, walk down to Raphael’s birthplace (7), stopping on the way at the Church of San Francesco (8), which has another great Barocci altarpiece, the Pardon of St Francis. Near the main west door are two marble grave slabs laid next to each other - one is the grave of Barocci, the other of Raphael’s parents. Raphael, Urbino's most famous son
  • 3pm - A few paces up the hill is where Raphael’s parents lived and he spent his early years. His father, Giovanni Santi, was a court painter to the Duke and set up his studio here in this smart 15th-century house on one of the town’s main streets. Raphael was born here in 1483 and trained at home at least until the age of 11, when his father died. There is a small mural attributed to the boy painter in one room, but the house is chiefly interesting as an atmospheric 15th-century home/workshop.
  • 4.30pm - Enjoy the late afternoon sunshine in the lovely, quiet shade of the walled Botanical Garden (9), which is 200 years old and maintained by the university. The entrance is on Via Bramante.
  • 8pm - Enjoy your evening meal at La Trattoria del Leone (10) (0039 0722 329894; latrattoriadelleone.it). Be sure to book as there are just a few tables in two, small, simple dining rooms. Specialities include rabbit with olives, bacon, sausages, passatelli and roast pork. It has a particularly good local wine list.

Day two [...]


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Raphael's School of Athens, the Duke of Urbino and Hypatia - a real mystery?

Raphael's School of Athens, the Duke of Urbino and Hypatia - a real mystery? | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
Many modern Internet sites claim that the person clad in a snow-white toga, bearing the likeness of Francesco Maria della Rovere (a favorite nephew of Pope Julius II, who became Duke of Urbino in 1508) depicted in the left foreground of "The School of Athens," was originally intended by Raphael to represent Hypatia of Alexandria. Unfortunately, there is no primary and/or objective evidence whatsoever to support this claim! Indeed, this is such a perfect example of fiction being made into fact, primarily due to the Internet [...]
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This is just one of the mysteries of this fresco, mysterious tales of papal scandal, political intrigue, and mob violence stretching back to the fifth century C.E.

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Italy’s Most Mysterious Paintings: Raphael’s La Fornarina

Italy’s Most Mysterious Paintings: Raphael’s La Fornarina | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

La Fornarina, by Raphael is a Renaissance portrait that’s not only sensual… it’s hiding some serious surprises.

Here’s what we know about La Fornarina, which hangs in the Palazzo Barberini in Rome. (An excellent copy hangs in Rome’s Galleria Borghese, as well).

We know the portrait was completed around 1520, the year of Raphael’s untimely death. We know the work is Raphael’s. And we know, of course, what it depicts: a lovely young woman, posing mostly nude, staring with a sweet, coy look at the viewer (and at the artist).

The big mystery: Who is she?

Of course, we can’t be sure. But some clues have led art historians to think she was none other than Raphael’s own mistress. And—here’s where Dan Brown would really go crazy—secret bride.

Raphael was a bit of a ladies’ man. But one woman, it seems, really stole his heart. Nicknamed “la Fornarina,” Margherita Luti, the daughter of a local baker, bewitched Raphael so much, the artist couldn’t concentrate on his commissioned work for Agostino Chigi—so much so that Chigi finally allowed her to move into the palace with him!

That the subject posed nude for Raphael is just one reason to think she might have been more than just a professional commission. Another hint: the fact that Raphael signed his name on the subject’s left armband, the arm connected to one’s heart. Or that her right hand is resting, gently, over her heart.

If this really is la Fornarina, then an even greater mystery was uncovered a few years ago—literally. When the painting was cleaned and restored, something surprising turned up on the girl’s left hand: a wedding ring.

Why did that give believers of the portrait’s identity as la Fornarina cause to gasp? Because while Raphael was going around with the baker’s daughter, he was engaged… to a cardinal’s niece. He never married the woman. But this, some say, might be the reason why: Turns out, he was already secretly married to la Fornarina!

That he would have kept the marriage a secret would have made sense, given his engagement and his high social status—and since he suddenly died at the age of 37, it’s equally plausible that a student of his would have rushed to cover up the ring, hoping to keep the marriage a secret for posterity. (It is, in fact, generally thought that the painting was found in Raphael’s studio when he died and that the “finishing touches,” including, perhaps, a cover-up, were added by his student, Giulio Romano, who then sold the painting).

Of course, lots of art historians disagree. One running theory: The woman isn’t a lover of Raphael, but Francesca Ardeasca, the wife of Agostini Chigi. That would explain the ring. But there’s no other portrait of Francesca in existence, so it’s impossible to prove.

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Artisoo Art's curator insight, April 12, 2013 4:41 AM

Please visit artisoo.com, we offer all kinds of oil painting reproductions and canvas painting sets.


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Raphael: Le Marche Artists

Raphael: Le Marche Artists | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (Urbino, March 28 or April 6 1483 – Rome, April 6  1520) better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.[4]
Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and despite his death at 37, a large body of his work remains. Many of his works are found in the Apostolic Palace of The Vatican, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career. The best known work is The School of Athens in the Vatican Stanza della Segnatura...

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Raphael - A Mortal God - BBC Documentary - Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (April 6 or March 28, 1483 – April 6, 1520), better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period. [...]

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Raffello Sanzio's curator insight, October 22, 2015 12:37 AM

I think this article on Rafael's evaluation is objective, not with emotional color and subjective feelings.

Raffello Sanzio's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:56 PM
This website is very useful, and the information is very real. It's very helpful for me to learn the art of Renaissance.
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Le Marche Renaissance Master Raphael in the largest exhibition of paintings every organized outside of Italy

Le Marche Renaissance Master Raphael in the largest exhibition of paintings every organized outside of Italy | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

One of the largest exhibition of paintings by Renaissance master Raphael every organized outside of Italy will launch a major art and trade initiative with Japan.
The “Italy in Japan 2013″ series, presented by the Embassy of Italy in Tokyo, aims to promote Italian culture, lifestyle, and wine, as well as business, research and innovation. After the program begins on March 1 with the Raphael show,
further exhibitions will present the works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and other Italian art masters.

Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520) was one of the great painters of the Italian Renaissance. Raphael brought the Renaissance painting style to maturity, creating a model for later painters. Due to the importance and rarity of his works, today it is extremely difficult to organize an exhibition dedicated to his works, even in Europe, the home to the majority of his extant oeuvre. This is the first large-scale Raphael exhibition held outside of Europe.

This exhibition features more than 20 works by Raphael, from examples from his study period that were heavily influenced by Perugino, to his time in Florence when his work was spurred on by contact with Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, to his later years, after his arrival in Rome in 1508 and his work on the large-scale projects for the Vatican. In particular the exhibition features one of Raphael's most famous images of the Madonna and Child, the "Madonna del Granduca." In combination with the works by Raphael, approximately 60 works by those active around him have been assembled for this exhibition, including prints made after his paintings and decorative art works designed on the basis of his plans. This exhibition will provide a splendid opportunity for visitors to learn about the entirety of Raphael, an artist who exerted a massive influence on all later artistic expression.


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Giovanni Santi, the artist Raphael’s father

Giovanni Santi, the artist Raphael’s father | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
Giovanni Santi, Raphael‘s father, was not a bad artist himself. Although Giorgio Vasari in his “Lives of the Artists”described Santi as a “pittore non molto eccellente” – (not a very distinguished painter), he added “uomo di buono ingegno e e atto a indirizzare i figliuoli per quella buona via” (a man of good intelligence and capable of directing his sons along that good path). The curators of the exhibition, “Raphael and Urbino” at the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche in the Palazzo Ducale in 2009, think that Raphael learnt his trade from his father and not from Perugino.

List some of the places in Le Marche and elsewhere where you can see dear old Mr Santi’s work:

Cagli, San Domenico, Tiranni Chapel - Sacra Conversazione with the Resurrection of Christ - photo
Fano, Sta Maria Nuova - Visitation
Florence, Galleria Corsini - The Muse Clio
London, National Gallery - The Virgin and Child
Royal Collection - Drawing for The Muse Clio, “A woman standing before rocks”.
Urbino, Galleria Nazionale delle Marche - The Dead Christ supported by Two Angels
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Treasures of Italy's Marche region on show at Vatican | Reuters

Treasures of Italy's Marche region on show at Vatican | Reuters | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

If you wanted to admire masterpieces of religious art by Titian, Raphael, Lorenzo Lotto, Guido Reni, Carlo Crivelli and other masters in museums around Italy's central Marche region, it could cost you a few weeks of time and a hefty hotel bill.Now, 50 paintings from 15 museums in the region rich in natural beauty and artistic heritage are on exhibition at the Vatican.

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