Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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The legend of the Apennine Sibyl

The legend of the Apennine Sibyl | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Traditionally the Sybil was a female figure linked to mysterious pagan rites, which was able to read the future and see the past and she would live in the mountains that were named after her.  An ancient legend tells of a virgin prophetess who was condemned by God to remain in the bowels of the mountain until the end of time… She keep in her grotto of the Kingdom of the Sybil gold and precious jewelry, protected by dragons. She is also surrounded by fairs that were attracting knights. The knights who succeeded to enter in her cave had to go out on the ninth day of stay or on the thirtieth, otherwise they would have been her prisoners in the cave forever. [...]

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The Mysterious Legends of the Sibilline Mountains in a book

The Mysterious Legends of the Sibilline Mountains in a book | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Legends of the Sibilline Mountains is a small book about an obscure corner of Italy and an equally obscure backwater of world literature. And yet the subjects it touches upon amongst them, the roots of literature in popular consciousness, the intimations of Christian existentialism, the absorption of pagan traditions into Christianity reach far and wide. Goddess worship, necromantic rites, the death of Pontius Pilate, Benevenuto Cellini, Goethe's "Faust" Wagner's "Tannhauser"...they all connect here in a real place of strange geological formations and magical beauty. The Sibilline Mountains, dividing Le Marche from Umbria, were "celebrated in the 14th and 15th centuries throughout all Europe for magical fairytales and necromantic initiations," according to the author Giuseppe Santarelli. In the most famous of these tales a mysterious Sibyl inhabits a grotto devoted to the pleasures of the flesh, luring knights to eternal damnation. Another legend concerns the Lago di Pilato, a mountaintop lake where Pontius Pilate's body had been cast, that later became a destination for demonic rituals. In a witty and personal tone Santarelli discusses the origins of the myths in folklore, their literary transformations through the centuries, and the archeological traces they left behind. This is the first English translation.

Giuseppe Santarelli was born in 1936 in Monte Giberto, a hill town of the Marches, Italy. He graduated from the Catholic University of Milan where for a decade (1967-1976) he taught Italian literature and language. He is the author of various esteemed essays on literature, history and art. Since 1982 he has been director of the Universal Congregation of the Holy House of Loreto and "Il Messaggio della Santa Casa/The Message of the Holy House."

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The Legend of Saint Emygdius

The Legend of Saint Emygdius | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Saint Emygdius (d. c. 309 AD) was a Christian bishop who is venerated as a martyr. Tradition states that he was killed during the persecution of Diocletian.
His legend states that he was a pagan of Trier who became a Christian. He traveled to Rome and cured the paralytic daughter of his host Gratianus, who had let him stay with him at his house on Tiber Island. Gratianus' family then converted to Christianity.
Emygdius also cured a blind man. The people of Rome believed him to be the son of Apollo and carried him off by force to the Temple of Aesculapius on the island in the Tiber, where he cured many of the sick. Emygdius declared himself a Christian, however, and tore down the pagan altars and smashed into pieces a statue of Aesculapius. He also converted many to Christianity; this enraged the prefect of the city.
He was made a bishop by Pope Marcellus I (or Pope Marcellinus), and sent to Ascoli Piceno.
On his way to Ascoli, Emydgius made more conversions, and performed a miracle where he made water gush out of a mountain after striking a cliff. Polymius, the local governor, attempted to convince Emygdius to worship Jupiter and the goddess Angaria, the patroness of Ascoli. Polymius also offered him the hand of his daughter Polisia. Instead Emygdius baptized her as a Christian in the waters of the Tronto, along with many others.
Enraged, Polymius decapitated him on the spot now occupied by the Sant'Emidio Red Temple, as well as his followers Eupolus (Euplus), Germanus, and Valentius (Valentinus). Emygdius stood up, carried his own head to a spot on a mountain where he had constructed an oratory (the site of the present-day Sant'Emidio alla Grotte). After Emygdius' martyrdom, his followers attacked Polymius' palace and pulled it down.

(Text Wikipedia)

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