Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Jewish Life in Urbino

Jewish Life in Urbino | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Maria Luisa’s family dates back to the 1400s in the Renaissance city of Urbino. Maria is the local caretaker of the synagogue and the Jewish cemetery outside the city. Nadia, a friend of Maria, has lived in Urbino for most of her life.

During the Renaissance and under the reign of the Montefeltro family, Jews lived throughout the community, worked in banking and other professions and shared many of the same rights as their Catholic neighbors: the right, for example, to buy, hold, and sell real estate and to employ Christian servants. By the second half of the 15th century, one-third of Urbino’s population was Jewish. [...]

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Photo from http://www.j-italy.org/treasures/type/cemeteries/urbino


The first documented Jewish presence in Urbino dates from the middle of the 14th century. Several land purchases are recorded from that time, particularly by the family of Master Daniel, in the district if Gadana (called to this day “Mountain of the Jews”). One of these lands was probably used as burial ground. Due to continued landslides, a new cemetery opened in 1874, not far from the old one. The old tombstones were relocated along its Eastern wall.

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Bar Mitzvah in Ancona | Ancona Jews Confront Fear Their Community May Disappear

Bar Mitzvah in Ancona | Ancona Jews Confront Fear Their Community May Disappear | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

[..] Ancona has only about 120 Jews. In all of Italy, only about 26,000 people are registered as members of Jewish communities.[...]
In the Middle Ages, Ancona was second only to Rome in the size of its Jewish population. It was a magnet for Jewish merchants, particularly from the Middle East, and for refugees from the Spanish and Portuguese expulsions.
“The Jewish presence here was so strong that the local dialect still reflects Jewish influence,” said Silvo Sacerdoti, 36, one of a handful of younger people active in the community.
“Many Anconans refer to a holiday as `Shabba’ — from the word Shabbat,” he said.
But after more than 1,000 years of proud history in Ancona, local Jews fear that their community may soon disappear unless something drastic happens.[...]

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A Brief Jewish History of Le Marche

A Brief Jewish History of Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Jews have been living in the Le Marche region for more than one thousand years and at least thirty Jewish communities can be documented in the region. Land records show Jews as owners of vineyards and olive trees as early as 967. The city of Senigallia attracted a sizable Jewish community by the 1300s due to its port and lucrative business opportunities. The Jewish presence in the city of Urbino dates back to the same period. A scholar known as Master Daniel arrived in Urbino from Viterbo in the 1300s to trade and open a bank. The city of Recanati, located between Ancona and Senigallia, was known as a seat of learning by at least the 1200s. Other cities include the sea port of Pesaro, and Fermo, a city mentioned by the great poet, Immanuel of Rome who found hospitality there in the house of a wealthy merchant. His great work, the "Mahbarot" was extensively edited in Fermo.

After the expulsion of the Jews from the Spanish dominions in 1492 and Portugal in 1497, waves of Jewish refugees began to arrive, settling in Ancona and the other port cities. In addition, Jews from Sicily and the south of Italy who had formerly lived in the Kingdom of Naples also began to arrive. Pope Paul III had invited merchants from the Levant to settle in Ancona regardless of their religion by the 1540s. [...]

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The organization of communities in the Marche Region was officially recognized by the government, at least from 1532 when the region was annexed to the Papal States. In 1542 it appeared in an official document as Universitas Judeorum Marchiae, and from other sources we know that it was a well organized body. The organization was headed by representatives of the various communities whose number it is difficult to ascertain.

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The first documented Jewish presence in Ascoli Piceno

The first documented Jewish presence in Ascoli Piceno | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The first documented Jewish presence in Ascoli Piceno in Le Marche dates back in 1297, when three Jews from Rome, Angeletto , Musetto and Sabato di Mosè, appear as part of a consortium of moneylenders along with 19 Christians. They signed a contract with the city council that same year. Jewish ownership of buildings is recorded starting in 1381. Jews appear to have purchased buildings and land in different sections of the city, an indication that they were not required to live in a particular neighborhoods.

The first recorded synagogue dates back to 1515 and was located in the house of Isacco di Mele, in the central district of St. Emidio. In 1550, following the arrival of a large number of Jews from Naples, a second synagogue was established in a building bought by Angelo di Sabato in the Cannettaro district. With the election of Pope Paul IV the Jews of Ascoli were forced into the ghetto which was located in what is today the area between Via Enoc d’Ascoli, Rua David d’Ascoli and Via Giudea.

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