Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Marvels from Marche II: sequels can be good

Marvels from Marche II: sequels can be good | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Following the successful exhibition in 2012, the Museum of Decorative Arts opens its doors today for a new edition of Marvels from Marche, a province in Italy, showing works from Perugino, Lorenzo Lotto, Titian and Guido Reni, among others. Aside from the works being marvellous in themselves, it is a marvel to see the exhibition here in Argentina.
Solidly curated — presented in chronology — starting with Pre-Renaissance and Renaissance works from the 14th and 15th centuries, the exhibition covers four centuries with 36 paintings. The paintings belong to public and private collections, museums and churches in Marche. Marche, the main supporter of the exhibition, is a region in the centre of Italy with a coast on the Adriatic Sea, historically an important route for trade. The region has also been part of the Papal States, which shows in the works on view. [...]

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Acclaimed mosaic artist Ben Craven exhibits 'Once upon a time' at the Palazzo Bonfranceschi in Belforte del Chienti

Acclaimed mosaic artist Ben Craven exhibits 'Once upon a time' at the Palazzo Bonfranceschi in Belforte del Chienti | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Last night we attended the launch of a very special exhibition in an appropriately atmospheric venue. The exhibition 'Once Upon a time' by Ben Craven was set in the International Dynamic Contemporary Art Museum (otherwise known as the Palazzo Bonfranceschi) in the breathtaking hilltop town of Belforte Del Chienti. British Ben Craven has spent almost a decade living in Le Marche with his young family amongst the rural community and farmers for whom the exhibition was dedicated.

The exhibition 'Once upon a time' by Ben Craven.

As neighbour's of Ben's we too have experienced the inherent values of the Marchegano people (tireless hospitality, kinship & kindness) representing an enduring traditional Italian community, we felt the exhibition captured the core of these people.

The exhibition cannot be said better than in the words of the (MIDAC) director Alfonso Caputo in

'The portraits by Ben Craven are very tangible. They are heavy for the matter that composes them. They are heavy for the fullness and complexity of the lives portrayed. They are heavy for the stories they contain. They are signs of a non superficial passage among the things of the daily world. They are not just faces, but also and especially the dialogues that have been developed with these people.

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Building the Picture: Architecture in Italian Renaissance Painting | The National Gallery

Building the Picture: Architecture in Italian Renaissance Painting | The National Gallery | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
Explore the significance of architecture in Italian Renaissance painting in this exhibition which includes works from Duccio, Botticelli and Crivelli.
Mariano Pallottini's insight:

An extensive urban vista, brilliantly evoked in brick, stone, marble and dribbled mortar where a battlemented wall has been repaired, emphasises the oddly public dimension Crivelli brings to this intimate spiritual moment. On a bridge a man reads a papal message delivered by carrier pigeon – a witty contemporary counterpart to the Annunciation, and the reason for this picture’s existence: it was painted to celebrate Pope Sixtus IV’s granting of self-government to the citizens of Ascoli Piceno on the feast of the Annunciation in 1482. The architectural mise en scène balances exquisitely the religious and patriotic demands of the commission.

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