Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Giovanni Santi from Le Marche: when the merit of the sons makes people forget the fathers

Giovanni Santi from Le Marche: when the merit of the sons makes people forget the fathers | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Giovanni Santi, father of the artist Raphael, died on 1 August 1494 in Urbino. He was in his late 50s. In addition to training his more famous son, Santi had a successful career as court painter and poet at the Court of Urbino. Born to a wealthy merchant family in the small town of Colbordolo, Santi pursued an artistic career and joined the lively art scene at the court of Duke Federico da Montefeltro in the 1470s. Santi’s work shows the influence of both Netherlandish and central Italian painting that he came to know while working at court. He likely came into contact there with Pietro Perugino, with whom his son Raphael would apprentice at the turn of the century. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Giovanni Santi, Raphael‘s father, was not a bad artist himself. Giorgio Vasari in his “Lives of the Artists” described G. Santi as a “pittore non molto eccellente” – (not a very distinguished painter), he added “uomo di buono ingegno e atto a indirizzare i figliuoli per quella buona via” (a man of good intelligence and capable of directing his sons along that good path).

 (Alys Blakeway on June Osborne's work, Giorgio Vasari)

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Benedetta Tintillini's curator insight, August 3, 2015 5:04 AM

Giovanni Santi, Raphael‘s father, was not a bad artist himself. Although Giorgio Vasari in his “Lives of the Artists”described Santi as a “pittore non molto eccellente” – (not a very distinguished painter), he added “uomo di buono ingegno e atto a indirizzare i figliuoli per quella buona via” (a man of good intelligence and capable of directing his sons along that good path).  

Alys Blakeway's comment, August 18, 2015 6:27 PM
Bravi Mariano e Benedettina ! I used the exact words of your insights in my blog which Mariano scooped on 1.12.2012."Raphael was not Perugino’s pupil, but Giovanni Santi’s." https://alysb.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/perugino-perugin-giovanni-santi-raphaels-father/
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Raphael: Le Marche Artists

Raphael: Le Marche Artists | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (Urbino, March 28 or April 6 1483 – Rome, April 6  1520) better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.[4]
Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and despite his death at 37, a large body of his work remains. Many of his works are found in the Apostolic Palace of The Vatican, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career. The best known work is The School of Athens in the Vatican Stanza della Segnatura...

(wikipedia)

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Raphael - A Mortal God - BBC Documentary - Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (April 6 or March 28, 1483 – April 6, 1520), better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period. [...]

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Raffello Sanzio's curator insight, October 22, 2015 12:37 AM

I think this article on Rafael's evaluation is objective, not with emotional color and subjective feelings.

Raffello Sanzio's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:56 PM
This website is very useful, and the information is very real. It's very helpful for me to learn the art of Renaissance.