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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Located in Le Marche the massive fireball falling from space that 66mln years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs

Located in Le Marche the massive fireball falling from space that 66mln years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Tourists flock to Italy to see Michelangelo's David and other iconic hunks of Renaissance stone, but in a trip over spring break, a group of Columbia students got to visit rocks that have shaped the world in even more profound ways. In the limestone outcrops of Italy's Apennine Mountains, geologist Walter Alvarez collected some of the earliest evidence that a massive fireball falling from space some 66 million years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs. Geologists have trekked to the region [Le Marche] since then to study that catastrophic event as well as others imprinted in these rocks. [...]

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Sarah Topps's curator insight, February 11, 5:39 AM

Gosh what an exciting discovery. Learn more about the dinosaurs and what they have in common with Le Marche

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Bartolomeo Eustachi: the prince of the anatomy from Le Marche

Bartolomeo Eustachi: the prince of the anatomy from Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Bartolomeo Eustachi (1500 or 1514 – 27 August 1574), also known by his Latin name of Eustachius, was one of the founders of the science of human anatomy.

He came from San Severino, near Macerata, Italy, and was a contemporary of Vesalius, with whom he shares the reputation of having created the science of human anatomy.

He is known as a supporter of Galen and extended the knowledge of the internal ear by rediscovering and describing correctly the tube that bears his name. He is the first who described the internal and anterior muscles of the malleus and the stapedius, and the complicated figure of the cochlea. He is the first who studied accurately the anatomy of the teeth, and the phenomena of the first and second dentition. Eustachius also discovered the adrenal glands (reported in 1563). His greatest work, which he was unable to publish, is his "Tabulae Anatomicae" Anatomical Engravings. Completed in 1552, nine years after Vesalius was published, the author feared ex-communication by the Catholic Church.

The fact that his book became a bestseller more than a century after his death shows the extent of the religious restrictions on anatomists all through the Renaissance.

Eustachius did not confine his researches to the study of relative anatomy. He investigated the intimate structure of organs with assiduity and success. What was too minute for unassisted vision he inspected by means of glasses (early microscopes). Structure that could not be understood in the recent state he unfolded by maceration in different fluids, or rendered more distinct by injection and exsiccation. The facts illustrated by these figures are so important that it has been said that, if the author had been fortunate enough to publish them, anatomy would have attained the perfection of the 18th century at least two centuries earlier.

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